Special Issue "Soil-Borne Obligate Parasite of Brassicaceae"

A special issue of Horticulturae (ISSN 2311-7524). This special issue belongs to the section "Plant Pathology and Disease Management (PPDM)".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 December 2021.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Edel Pérez-López
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Phytology, Laval University, Québec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
Interests: clubroot; effectors; ETI; pathotyping; phytoplasmas; diagnostics

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Clubroot is a devastating disease affecting plants into the Brassicaceae family worldwide. Plasmodiophora brassicae, the clubroot pathogen, is a soil-borne obligate parasite member of the eukaryotic group Rhizaria. In recent years, many important discoveries about the biology of the clubroot pathogen, the different mechanisms used to infect the susceptible hosts, the life cycle, and also the best management practices to avoid the spreading of the pathogen in the field have been done. The purpose of this Special Issue on the “Soil-Borne Obligate Parasite of Brassicaceae” is to present more of the science aiming at a better understanding of the clubroot pathogen and its relationship with the hosts.

In this Special Issue, we welcome articles (original research papers, perspectives, reviews, methods) in molecular biology, omics (genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics), genetics, resistance, and physiology to understand the clubroot pathogen. We also welcome agronomic studies identifying better management strategies and field practices to avoid the spreading of the disease or to reduce its impact in infected fields.

Dr. Edel Pérez-López
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Horticulturae is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Plasmodiophora brassicae
  • clubroot
  • rapeseed
  • Brassicaceae
  • Arabidopsis
  • effectors
  • diagnostics
  • canola

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Perspective
Digitalization of Clubroot Disease Index, a Long Overdue Task
Horticulturae 2021, 7(8), 241; https://doi.org/10.3390/horticulturae7080241 - 12 Aug 2021
Viewed by 594
Abstract
Clubroot is a devastating disease caused by the protist Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin. After root hair colonization, the clubroot pathogen induces clubs that block water uptake, leading to dehydration and death. The study of the severity of plant diseases is very important. It allows [...] Read more.
Clubroot is a devastating disease caused by the protist Plasmodiophora brassicae Woronin. After root hair colonization, the clubroot pathogen induces clubs that block water uptake, leading to dehydration and death. The study of the severity of plant diseases is very important. It allows us to characterize the level of resistance of plant germplasm and to classify the virulence of pathogen strains or isolates. Lately, the use of learning machines and automatization has expanded to plant pathology. Fast, reliable and unbiased methods are always necessary, and with clubroot disease indexing this is not different. From this perspective, we discuss why this is the case and how we could achieve this long overdue task for clubroot disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Soil-Borne Obligate Parasite of Brassicaceae)
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