Special Issue "Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities"

A special issue of Heritage (ISSN 2571-9408). This special issue belongs to the section "Cultural Heritage".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Stella Sofia Kyvelou
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Economics and Regional Development, Panteion University of Social and Political Sciences, Athens, Greece
Interests: urban geography; territorial development; sustainable spatial and urban planning; ecosystems thinking; eco-urbanism; urban design; built heritage; marine/maritime spatial planning; underwater cultural heritage
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Nikitas Chiotinis

Guest Editor
School of Applied Arts and Culture, University of West Attica, 12243 Athens, Greece
Interests: philosophy of arts and culture; architecture; built heritage; heritage management; sustainability

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Following the ECHOPOLIS 2018 International Conference (www.echopolis.eu) held in Athens, Greece (26–28 November 2018), a Special Issue welcoming contributions that are dedicated to major research themes related to “Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities” is proposed. The following research subjects, discussed also in the framework of some ECHOPOLIS Plenary and Special Sessions, are indicated here as possible topics of interest:

  • Natural and tangible/intangible Cultural Heritage as Strategic Territorial Development Resources;
  • Linking cultural and natural heritage;
  • Climate change, natural and other threats to cultural heritage;
  • Sounds and Soundscapes as elements of the culture of places;
  • Cultural heritage, archaeological sites, monuments, and sensory landscapes;
  • Shaping places with culture and nature;
  • Natural and cultural heritage: planning, management, governance, marketing, funding;
  • New mapping and surveying technologies for cultural or/and natural heritage Tourism and Heritage, Cultural Tourism.

This Special Issue will also be open to contributions dealing with other subjects related to the major research themes mentioned above.

Dr. Stella Kyvelou
Prof. Nikitas Chiotinis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Heritage is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Cultural heritage
  • Natural heritage
  • Cultural Landscapes
  • Sensory Landscapes
  • Cultural ecosystem services
  • Mapping and surveying technologies for cultural heritage
  • Governance of cultural heritage
  • Underwater cultural heritage
  • Cultural heritage sites
  • Contemporary Museum practices
  • Tourism and Heritage
  • Cultural Tourism

Published Papers (11 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Other

Open AccessArticle
Construction of Interpretation and Presentation System of Cultural Heritage Site: An Analysis of the Old City, Zuoying
Heritage 2021, 4(1), 316-332; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage4010020 - 10 Feb 2021
Abstract
Interpretation and presentation is an essential component of the whole heritage conservation process. In response to the new opportunities and challenges arising from the changing perspectives on heritage conservation, the development of display technologies and the rise of cultural tourism, it becomes a [...] Read more.
Interpretation and presentation is an essential component of the whole heritage conservation process. In response to the new opportunities and challenges arising from the changing perspectives on heritage conservation, the development of display technologies and the rise of cultural tourism, it becomes a challenging task for cultural heritage institutions to construct a systematic interpretation and presentation system of a cultural heritage site that can effectively communicate heritage significance and value to the public and provide visitors with positive and valuable experience. From four main aspects (site, technology, public, and education and research), this research provides a comprehensive overview of the implementation details of the interpretation and presentation system of Old Zuoying City, which is considered an unprecedented large-scale cultural heritage preservation plan in Taiwan, through participative site investigation and in-depth interviews, thereby providing a reference for the construction, implementation, and management of interpretation and presentation system at cultural heritage sites. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Visible and “Invisible” Aspects of Historic Mediterranean Metropolises Perpetually Emerging through Augmented Reality
Heritage 2021, 4(1), 249-259; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage4010015 - 24 Jan 2021
Abstract
Alexandria and Istanbul, through diverse texts and writers, meet and intersect in their attempt to reconstruct and rebuild the metropolis’s character. Our method advocates spatiotemporal events in augmented literature that enable reflection of the palimpsest of historical frames. On a higher level, what [...] Read more.
Alexandria and Istanbul, through diverse texts and writers, meet and intersect in their attempt to reconstruct and rebuild the metropolis’s character. Our method advocates spatiotemporal events in augmented literature that enable reflection of the palimpsest of historical frames. On a higher level, what we propose in this work is the dialogic field between the two metropolises, as it could be provided by novels’ chronotopes with the aid of augmented reality. We undertake a twofold task, to reveal the awareness of the connections between places and the connection and attachment of particular spaces, by unifying two approaches. First, Ecocriticism that comprises the ways in which novels express socio-cultural frameworks of the natural environment. The second approach is based on the strong interrelations of place engagement with collective and cultural memory. The linking of both urban, spatial geometry and topology with the waterscape for both metropolises, in our proposed conceptualization of a chronotope-based augmented continuum, endeavors to provide, firstly, the dialogic relations between the two metropolises, between each metropolis and the waterscape and, secondly, between urbanscape and waterscape and the novels’ fictional frameworks. Within the framework of the augmented reality, we synthesize the writers’ fictional cities with the factual surroundings of the metropolises in order to reconstruct the fragmented natural and architectural urban views in the continuity of the urban fabric, thus ending up proposing a dynamic repository of the metropolis landscape’s natural, collective and cultural memory. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Open AccessArticle
Recording and Evaluating the Tangible and Intangible Cultural Assets of a Place through a Multicriteria Decision-Making System
Heritage 2020, 3(4), 1483-1495; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage3040082 - 02 Dec 2020
Abstract
The starting point of this paper is the fact that multicriteria decision-making systems have not had the greatest impact on cultural studies, and few researchers have addressed this problem. The paper focuses on the analysis of the main object of an ongoing Doctoral [...] Read more.
The starting point of this paper is the fact that multicriteria decision-making systems have not had the greatest impact on cultural studies, and few researchers have addressed this problem. The paper focuses on the analysis of the main object of an ongoing Doctoral thesis. More specifically, it examines the proposal of a new multicriteria evaluation based on a decision-making method. The paper intends to relate culture with multicriteria decision-making methods. This systematic review provides the direct analysis and assessment of the existing bibliographic references, and addresses a gap of knowledge in the intangible research field, identifying trends in the broader cultural heritage sector. The two basic principles of the paper are the recording and the evaluation of the cultural significance of the intangible and tangible heritage assets of a place. More specifically, the paper seeks to address a new scientific tool that initially records and—in the process—evaluates, using quantitative and qualitative criteria, specific cultural assets. Moreover, the paper outlines a new approach to the calibration—from optimal to worse—of the heritage of a place according to its significance. The purpose of the record and the evaluation is to create a ranking list of the most culturally significant tangible and intangible asset of places, in order to manage them. The design of the multicriteria method is based on a system that can be constantly updated diachronically, and can be fulfilled with new cultural assets and then re-evaluated. The explanation of the system is given through a step-by-step guide to the data analysis process, ensuring that the system has elements that are easy to access, to understand, and to use by each state actor (institution, individual, company, etc.). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Cultural Heritage as a Means for Local Development in Mediterranean Historic Cities—The Need for an Urban Policy
Heritage 2020, 3(2), 152-175; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage3020010 - 26 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Urban and regional development have not stopped engaging, troubling, and dividing the international scientific community and national and regional policy-making bodies. The wide range of consequences brought on by the current multifaceted downturn at all geographical scales requires the continuous investigation of practices [...] Read more.
Urban and regional development have not stopped engaging, troubling, and dividing the international scientific community and national and regional policy-making bodies. The wide range of consequences brought on by the current multifaceted downturn at all geographical scales requires the continuous investigation of practices and the designation of innovative mechanisms or tools to formulate new developmental axes for action, able to respond to contemporary needs and challenges. This holds true particularly in an age, such as the one we are currently experiencing, of network organization of infrastructures and functions dominated by the knowledge economy. Within this framework, we estimate that the response to an attempt to restructure production in Greece and increase support for its cities and regions could be sought by setting up collaboration networks with cultural heritageand support creative entrepreneurship as key developmental “elements”, focusing on strategies for recovery, modernization, and a return to historic cities and regional settlements. Specifically, using inputs from a collaboration project among historic cities in the Mediterranean, and an ongoing research in fragmented insular regions with many historic cities and settlements in the Aegean, we maintain that the goal of restoring local communities could be sought though initiatives or actions to preserve and diffuselocal traditions and know-how in the framework of an overall urban developmental policy capable of ensuring ongoing collaboration and networking at all geographical levels and categories of space. In this rationale, this article attempts to contribute to the debate by stating proposals in the framework of principles and guidelines that should govern the formulation of this urban policy, which is still missing in Greece. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Historic Gardens and Parks Worldwide and in Greece: Principles of Acknowledgement, Conservation, Restoration and Management
Heritage 2019, 2(4), 2678-2690; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage2040165 - 20 Sep 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) Florence Charter 1981 on Historic Gardens sets the first guidelines for the definition of a historic garden, in which sites such as large parks, whether formal or landscape, are included. Since then, there is a [...] Read more.
The International Council on Monuments and Sites (ICOMOS) Florence Charter 1981 on Historic Gardens sets the first guidelines for the definition of a historic garden, in which sites such as large parks, whether formal or landscape, are included. Since then, there is a continuous effort worldwide on issues of historic garden acknowledgement, conservation, restoration and management. Countries with garden and park tradition, such as the U.K., USA, France and others, have several sites registered and protected. Furthermore, historic garden and park associations exist in Italy, Spain and Portugal, among other nations. In Greece, there is no specific official policy or association regarding historic parks, gardens or landscapes. Greek law includes historic gardens and parks within the spectrum of works of art, places of outstanding natural beauty and historic places/lands for partial or absolute protection, and, thus, attempts in identifying historic landscapes fall generally in other categories, but law specified for historic gardens. However, in both the Greek ratification of the European Landscape Convention and the European Biodiversity directives, there are aspects one could interpret as very useful for the acknowledgement and policy-making on historic gardens and parks. In this paper, an overview on historic gardens and parks abroad and in Greece is attempted, along with aspects of acknowledgement, protection, conservation, restoration and management. Finally, a first attempt on methodological outlines for the acknowledgement and conservation of historic gardens and parks in Greece is presented. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Open AccessArticle
Museum Practices as Tools to (Re)Define Memory and Identity Issues Through Direct Experience of Tangible and Intangible Heritage
Heritage 2019, 2(3), 2408-2416; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage2030148 - 12 Aug 2019
Abstract
In the liquid-like times of post-modernity, where the notions of memory, identity, and culture are undergoing a process of redefinition, transition, and interpenetration, the role of museums as institutions responsible for heritage preservation and distribution needs to be revised in terms of their [...] Read more.
In the liquid-like times of post-modernity, where the notions of memory, identity, and culture are undergoing a process of redefinition, transition, and interpenetration, the role of museums as institutions responsible for heritage preservation and distribution needs to be revised in terms of their engagement with exhibitions, audiences, and strategies. The following text will analyze some examples of those tendencies implemented in contemporary museums practices observed in two cities: Gdańsk, Poland and Berlin, Germany. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
On “Arogi” Buildings’ Structural System and Construction Procedure after the 1953 Earthquake in Kefalonia
Heritage 2019, 2(3), 2193-2205; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage2030133 - 26 Jul 2019
Abstract
After the series of earthquakes in August 1953, most of Kefalonia’s building stock totally collapsed. The buildings that emerged as a result of a collective effort are commonly referred to as “arogi” buildings, with the term arogi meaning help or assistance. In this [...] Read more.
After the series of earthquakes in August 1953, most of Kefalonia’s building stock totally collapsed. The buildings that emerged as a result of a collective effort are commonly referred to as “arogi” buildings, with the term arogi meaning help or assistance. In this way, merely referring to these structures is a direct mention to the circumstances under which they were constructed. The reconstruction of the building stock of the island was based in a series of building types proposed from the authorities, and proceeded replacing the richness of the architectural forms that stood before the earthquake, with austere but necessary settlements. Nevertheless, it is these buildings that constitute today’s image of the island. This study wishes to introduce us to the “arogi” buildings structural system, as it was applied in Kefalonia after the 1953 earthquake, with reference to recent bibliography and the recent experience of the 2014 earthquake. The purpose of setting the grounds for such research would be to highlight the effectiveness of this structural system. Moreover, to emphasize the fact that “arogi” buildings and their construction procedure incorporate Kefalonia’s recent history and have eventually produced today’s available “traditional” architecture of the island. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Planning for the Enhancement of the Modern Built Heritage in Thessaly Region: The Case of the “Konakia” Monuments
Heritage 2019, 2(3), 2039-2052; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage2030123 - 22 Jul 2019
Abstract
Built heritage constitutes an invaluable asset to be treasured and wisely managed in order to avoid loss of place identity, cultural and social degradation and loss of leisure and tourism opportunities. The present paper focuses on the modern built heritage of the Thessaly [...] Read more.
Built heritage constitutes an invaluable asset to be treasured and wisely managed in order to avoid loss of place identity, cultural and social degradation and loss of leisure and tourism opportunities. The present paper focuses on the modern built heritage of the Thessaly Region (Greece), giving special emphasis to the “konakia” monuments built during the late 19th and early 20th century that were once used as residences by the big landowners of the Thessalian agricultural plain (“tsiflikia”). Field research conducted, as well as a survey of secondary data, revealed that only fifteen (15) “konakia” remain in Thessaly, equally dispersed in Larisa, Trikala and Karditsa Prefectures. Given their use, all of the “konakia” are found within—or in the vicinity of—agricultural land and settlements. Most of them present severe signs of abandonment, while only four (4) of them are in use (either as second-homes or as spaces with cultural and administrative use). Starting in 1979 (until 2005), with the exception of the Averof “konakia”, all of the rest have been designated as part of the modern built heritage of Greece. Considering these facts—and that most of such properties are private—the paper proposes a six (6) step methodology, for their wise management and integration in the spatial and cultural landscape of Thessaly: (1) Selection of the proper type of (re)use of the monument(s), (2) selection (or reconsideration) of the protection status and zoning, (3) identification of the urban regeneration interventions, (4) introduction of the necessary amendments to the urban/local plan, (5) selection of the proper financial tools and (6) selection of the proper marketing strategy. The paper concludes by highlighting the need to address the “konakia” as a set of monuments, to achieve stakeholders’ engagement and local community involvement, without undermining either protection status or the private rights of owners over these cultural properties. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Other

Jump to: Research

Open AccessCase Report
Society and Culture: Cultural Policies Driven by Local Authorities as A Factor in Local Development—The Example of the Municipality of Xanthi-Greece
Heritage 2019, 2(3), 2625-2639; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage2030161 - 05 Sep 2019
Abstract
This research article examines cultural policies designed by local government authorities and their impact on social and regional development in the municipality of Xanthi, Thrace. It also analyzes and examines the cultural activities implemented by the Greek municipalities. In particular, it reflects upon [...] Read more.
This research article examines cultural policies designed by local government authorities and their impact on social and regional development in the municipality of Xanthi, Thrace. It also analyzes and examines the cultural activities implemented by the Greek municipalities. In particular, it reflects upon events, changes, and concerns that involve cultural affairs, and evaluates their socioeconomic, political, spatial, and regional dimensions. Considering that the locality is part of the totality, the process of achieving cultural development in Xanthi is particularly interesting, as it is fundamental to the entire Greek cultural image. The regional element of the area can be also identified as national. Consequently, local cultural development becomes an essential part of national development. This study could trigger a fertile and constructive process of reflection on the role of local cultural policy in further achieving social and economic development. The issues raised by the research contribute to scientific research and dialogue and highlight the role of municipalities as active cultural assets with distinct cultural identities in the context of a Europe of Regions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessTechnical Note
Using Different Ways of 3D Reconstruction of Historical Cities for Gaming Purposes: The Case Study of Nafplio
Heritage 2019, 2(3), 1799-1811; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage2030110 - 02 Jul 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Virtual reality (VR) technologies offer a unique opportunity in “3D reconstruction” of cultural monuments and historical cities that do not longer exist or have been modified (partially or totally). Even though technological capabilities are growing fast, emphasis is mainly given on developing virtual [...] Read more.
Virtual reality (VR) technologies offer a unique opportunity in “3D reconstruction” of cultural monuments and historical cities that do not longer exist or have been modified (partially or totally). Even though technological capabilities are growing fast, emphasis is mainly given on developing virtual museums and exhibitions, while archaeological places and excavations are following. The present paper presents two distinct approaches for 3D reconstruction of the historical city of Nafplio (Greece), by developing 3D models for buildings and monuments the way they used to be in the 19th century. The authors have used their professional and academic experience deriving from their participation in a European Commission co-funded project in the framework of the Partnership Agreement 2007–2013, which was implemented by the “V. Papantoniou” Peloponnesian Folklore Foundation (the project’s beneficiary) in Nafplio. The authors aim (a) to present the importance of reconstructing past cities and (b) to implement gaming technologies in cultural organizations as a means of achieve specific educational goals. Results point out the growing need for close cooperation between the cultural and academic worlds with 3D creators, and, moreover, reveal obstacles and opportunities in reconstructing historical cities and monuments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessTechnical Note
Reconnecting Nature and Culture—The INCREAte Approach and Its Practical Implementation in the Island of Kythera
Heritage 2019, 2(2), 1630-1639; https://doi.org/10.3390/heritage2020100 - 05 Jun 2019
Abstract
Integrated Nature CultuRE Approach (INCREAte) promotes the interconnection of culture and nature. this approach primarily targeted toward nature conservation managers but is also applicable to any agent working on nature–culture issues or area and resource management. The focus of this approach is to [...] Read more.
Integrated Nature CultuRE Approach (INCREAte) promotes the interconnection of culture and nature. this approach primarily targeted toward nature conservation managers but is also applicable to any agent working on nature–culture issues or area and resource management. The focus of this approach is to guide users to design more integrated and efficient conservation projects by working on issues related to culture while also addressing stakeholders’ participation and human wellbeing. Allowing users to be selective and flexible, such issues can also be incorporated in ongoing projects, making the INCREAte approach a practice-oriented guidance and toolkit rather than a "take it or leave it" option. It was developed by the Scientific Secretariat of the Mediterranean Institute for Nature and Anthropos (MedINA) that, since 2003, promotes joint management of natural and cultural heritage and the strengthening of the diachronic relationship between humankind and nature. This approach has been successfully tested in Kythera, where a strategy for tourism has been designed through a sequence of its relevant steps. The main focus of the strategy is the development of an integrated and innovative trail network, which, coupled with the accompanying activities of the programme, is designed to reveal and sustain the natural and cultural heritage of the island. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cultural Heritage: Current Threats and Opportunities)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop