Special Issue "Wind Impacts on Forests and Trees in a Changing Climate—A Special Issue in Collaboration with the IUFRO Working Party 8.03.06"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 June 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Jean-Claude Ruel
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Guest Editor
Department of Wood and forest sciences, Laval University, 2405 de la terrasse, Quebec G1V 0A6, Canada
Interests: natural regeneration; windthrow
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Barry Gardiner
Website
Guest Editor
Forest Research, Bush Estate, Roslin EH25 9SY, United Kingdom
Interests: wind damage in forests; forest risk modelling; forest meteorology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Trees regularly face a number of biotic and abiotic stresses. Among these, wind play an important role in stand dynamics but can also interfere with forest management plans. In recent decades, a number of severe storms have caused serious damage in many parts of the world leading to large economic and habitat losses. This situation is likely to become more prevalent in the context of climate change where a higher recurrence of extreme events is expected and there is an increased risk of additional damage from bark beetles and fires following a wind storm. Understanding the windthrow process, its impacts, and adjusting to windthrow risk require an interdisciplinary approach building on an understanding of climate, ecology, wind behavior, tree biomechanics, tree physiology, silviculture, and tree and forest management. 

For this Special Issue, we encourage contributions that try to build a better understanding of wind impacts on trees and how this knowledge can be integrated into the management of trees and forests, placing this new knowledge in the context of climate change. The core of the Special issue will consist of papers presented at the IUFRO 2020 Wind and trees conference (https://windandtrees2020.com/), but additional papers are welcome. Contributions can take the form of either research papers or comprehensive review articles.

Prof. Jean-Claude Ruel
Dr. Barry Gardiner
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Windflow
  • Biomechanics
  • Windthrow hazard
  • Resilient forests
  • Climate change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Ecosystem Management of Eastern Canadian Boreal Forests: Potential Impacts on Wind Damage
Forests 2020, 11(5), 578; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11050578 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
Research Highlights: Windthrow can interfere significantly with ecosystem management practices. In some cases, their goal could still be reached but this may prove more complex in other cases, like the partial cutting of old-growth stands. In situations where windthrow is common without any [...] Read more.
Research Highlights: Windthrow can interfere significantly with ecosystem management practices. In some cases, their goal could still be reached but this may prove more complex in other cases, like the partial cutting of old-growth stands. In situations where windthrow is common without any human intervention, the use of partial cutting to maintain some stand structures may lead to a feedback loop leading to additional windthrow. Background and Objectives: Forest ecosystem management using natural disturbances as a template has become the management paradigm in many regions. Most of the time, the focus is on fire regime and effects. However, windthrow can be common in some places or can interfere with practices implemented in an ecosystem management strategy. This paper looks at interactions between ecosystem management and windthrow. Materials and Methods: The paper builds on three case studies looking at various elements that could be part of ecosystem management strategies. The first one looks at the impact of green tree retention, while the second one looks at the impact of reducing the size and dispersing clearcuts, and the last one examines the impact of a range of cutting practices in irregular old-growth stands. Results: Green tree retention leads to increased windthrow, especially when applied within mature even-aged stands. Reducing the size of clearcuts and dispersing them over the landscape also involves substantial windthrow along edges. Partial cutting in old-growth stands can lead to relatively high mortality, but part of it is not necessarily related to wind since it occurs as standing dead trees. Differences in the amount of damage with tree size and species have been found and could be used to reduce wind damage. Conclusions: Approaches to minimize wind damage in ecosystem management can be designed using existing knowledge. However, using windthrow as a template to design management strategies would prove more complex. Full article
Open AccessArticle
Evaluating the Likelihood of Tree Failure in Naples, Florida (United States) Following Hurricane Irma
Forests 2020, 11(5), 485; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11050485 - 25 Apr 2020
Abstract
Trees in residential landscapes provide many benefits, but can injure persons and damage property when they fail. In hurricane-prone regions like Florida, USA, the regular occurrence of hurricanes has provided an opportunity to assess factors that influence the likelihood of wind-induced tree failure [...] Read more.
Trees in residential landscapes provide many benefits, but can injure persons and damage property when they fail. In hurricane-prone regions like Florida, USA, the regular occurrence of hurricanes has provided an opportunity to assess factors that influence the likelihood of wind-induced tree failure and develop species failure profiles. We assessed open-grown trees in Naples, Florida, following the passage of Hurricane Irma in September 2017 to determine the effect of relevant factors on the degree of damage sustained by individual trees. Of 4034 assessed individuals (n = 15 species), 74% sustained no damage, 4% sustained only minor damage (i.e., minimal corrective pruning needed), 6% sustained significant damage (i.e., major corrective pruning needed), and 15% were whole-tree failures (i.e., overturned trees or trees requiring removal). The proportion of individuals in each damage category varied among species, stem diameter at 1.4 m above ground, and the presence of utility lines, which was a proxy for maintenance. We compared our results with the findings of seven previous hurricanes in the region to explore species’ resilience in hurricanes. Full article
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