Special Issue "Forest Land Use Cover Changes (LUCC) and Impacts on Environment in South/Southeast Asian Countries"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Krishna Prasad Vadrevu
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Remote Sensing Scientist, NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama, USA
Interests: remote sensing; forest biodiversity; fires; GHG emissions; sustainability
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Kasturi Kanniah
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Faculty of Built Environment and Surveying, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia, 81310 UTM, Johor Bahru, Malaysia
Interests: remote sensing; plantations; emissions; land cover change
Dr. Garik Gutman
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Program Manager, NASA LCLUC Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington D.C., USA
Interests: remote sensing of land use/cover changes
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Chris Justice
E-Mail Website
Co-Guest Editor
Department of Geographical Sciences, University of Maryland College Park, College Park, MD 20742, USA
Interests: remote sensing of land use/cover changes; fires; agricultural systems; global change research
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests in South/Southeast Asia (S/SEA) are undergoing rapid changes due to pressures from increased population and economic development. Addressing land-use cover changes (LUCC) in the forestry sector is one of the most important scientific challenges in global change research. LUCC are important drivers of environmental change in South/Southeast Asia (S/SEA). In the region, LUCC in the forestry sector manifest in a variety of phenomena, such as deforestation, logging, reforestation, etc. Slash-and-burn agriculture continues to be a major driver of forest-cover changes in the hilly regions of India, Myanmar, Thailand, Laos, and Cambodia. Further, a recent rise in the global prices for commodity crops like rubber and oil palm has resulted in an increase in commercial plantations, replacing natural forests. Drivers of LUCC in the forestry sector vary widely in the region, such as economic development, government policies, international trade, inappropriate forest management, and land tenure issues. In addition, variability in the weather, climate, and socioeconomic factors is another driver of forest LUCC. Some of the LUCC impacts on forests include disruption of biogeochemical cycles and changes in the radiation and the surface energy balance of the atmosphere. Following the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) guidelines, greenhouse gas emissions from land-use change in the forestry sector are related to changes in biomass stocks as a result of forest management, logging, fuelwood collection, and conversion of existing forests to other land-use categories. Thus, documenting these changes and associated impacts in the forestry sector gains significance, as the results can be used to address improved forest management, including GHG mitigation. To document LUCC in the forestry sector, spatially explicit, time-series data are essential. Further, in S/SEA, there is an increasing need to develop consistent and reliable forestry datasets that are useful for management and policy-making. We invite articles covering the above topics and those listed below, focusing on South and Southeast Asian countries: · Applications of optical, thermal, multispectral, hyperspectral, lidar, and airborne remote sensing data for forest mapping, monitoring and impact assessment studies; · LUCC in the forestry sector and impacts on carbon cycling and greenhouse gas emissions; · documenting changes in the forestry sector due to slash-and-burn agriculture; · forest fires and associated impacts; · forest biodiversity inventory studies; · mapping and monitoring of land management practices, disturbances, and interactions; · Detecting long-term trends in the forestry sector and impacts on hydrological variables, such as runoff, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture; · deforestation and its impact on the socioeconomic status of indigenous people; · forest protected area management; · scalable approaches (statistical and modeling) for improving forestry datasets and impacts at large spatial scales; · forest dynamics in secondary forests; · spatiotemporal data mining, modeling, and analysis for forestry LU/CC data and impact assessment studies; · new tools and methods for forestry data generation and dissemination.

Dr. Krishna Prasad Vadrevu
Dr. Kasturi Kanniah
Dr. Garik Gutman
Dr. Chris Justice
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Applications of optical, thermal, multispectral, hyperspectral, lidar, and airborne remote sensing data for forest mapping, monitoring, and impact assessment studies
  • LUCC in the forestry sector and impacts on carbon cycling and greenhouse gas emissions
  • documenting changes in the forestry sector due to slash-and-burn agriculture
  • forest fires and associated impacts
  • forest biodiversity inventory studies
  • mapping and monitoring of land management practices, disturbances, and interactions
  • detecting long-term trends in the forestry sector and impacts on hydrological variables, such as runoff, evapotranspiration, and soil moisture
  • deforestation and its impact on the socioeconomic status of indigenous people
  • forest protected area management
  • scalable approaches (statistical and modeling) for improving forestry datasets and impacts at large spatial scales
  • forest dynamics in secondary forests
  • spatiotemporal data mining, modeling, and analysis for forestry LU/CC data and impact assessment studies
  • new tools and methods for forestry data generation and dissemination

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Relationship Between Fire and Forest Cover Loss in Riau Province, Indonesia Between 2001 and 2012
Forests 2019, 10(10), 889; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10100889 - 08 Oct 2019
Abstract
Forest and peatland fires occur regularly across Indonesia, resulting in large greenhouse gas emissions and causing major air quality issues. Over the last few decades, Indonesia has also experienced extensive forest loss and conversion of natural forest to oil palm and timber plantations. [...] Read more.
Forest and peatland fires occur regularly across Indonesia, resulting in large greenhouse gas emissions and causing major air quality issues. Over the last few decades, Indonesia has also experienced extensive forest loss and conversion of natural forest to oil palm and timber plantations. Here we used data on fire hotspots and tree-cover loss, as well as information on the extent of peat land, protected areas, and concessions to explore spatial and temporal relationships among forest, forest loss, and fire frequency. We focus on the Riau Province in Central Sumatra, one of the most active regions of fire in Indonesia. We find strong relationships between forest loss and fire at the local scale. Regions with forest loss experienced six times as many fire hotspots compared to regions with no forest loss. Forest loss and maximum fire frequency occurred within the same year, or one year apart, in 70% of the 1 km2 cells experiencing both forest loss and fire. Frequency of fire was lower both before and after forest loss, suggesting that most fire is associated with the forest loss process. On peat soils, fire frequency was a factor 10 to 100 lower in protected areas and natural forest logging concessions compared to oil palm and wood fiber (timber) concessions. Efforts to reduce fire need to address the underlying role of land-use and land-cover change in the occurrence of fire. Increased support for protected areas and natural forest logging concessions and restoration of degraded peatlands may reduce future fire risk. During times of high fire risk, fire suppression resources should be targeted to regions that are experiencing recent forest loss, as these regions are most likely to experience fire. Full article
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