Special Issue "Biodiversity and Management of Temperate Floodplain Forests"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 December 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Ivo Machar
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Development and Environmental Studies, Faculty of Science, Palacky University Olomouc, 17th Listopadu 12, 77146 Olomouc, Czech Republic
Interests: applying of landscape ecological principles to forest biodiversity conservation; floodplain forest ecology and sustainable management
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Floodplain forests are considered as key forest ecosystems in lowland regions of the temperate climate zone. Ecosystem services of floodplain forests are manifold, extending from flood risk management to maintaining biodiversity, supporting of sustainable management of water resources, timber production, etc. Very often, the floodplain forest’s ecosystem function is gravely disturbed due to the modification of stream channels or hydroelectricity development and flood protection structures. The ecological role of floodplain forest ecosystems in landscape is emphasized in the context of global changes because of the flood event frequency and extent rising in landscapes along lowland rivers.
This Special Issue (SI) of Forests deals with these important ecosystem functions of floodplain forests from a worldwide perspective. The aim of this SI is to fill the knowledge gaps related to the mapping, assessment, management, conservation, and restoration of floodplain forest habitats, dynamics, and its ecosystem services. Papers in this SI should support the building of bridges between forest sciences, forest management practices via the applcation of sustainability principles to multifunctional forestry and land-use in alluvial landscapes. Papers dealing with floodplain forest ecosystem function and their alteration by hydro-engineering structures and possibilities for the restoration of dynamics and ecosystem functions are also welcome. Finally, manuscripts which deal with the role of stakeholders and social–economical aspects of floodplain forest management are also invited to this SI. Papers published in this SI will be important in helping to better understand floodplain forests’ functions and their restoration and in the development of sustainable forest management practices, including biodiversity conservation of these unique forest ecosystems.

Dr. Ivo Machar
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • biodiversity conservation
  • climate change and flood-risk management
  • cultural floodplain landscape
  • forest ecosystem management
  • groundwater dynamics
  • history of human impacts to floodplain ecosystems
  • hydrology of floodplain
  • riparian landscape
  • river regulation
  • river restoration
  • water retention and forests

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Alluvial Artisanal and Small-Scale Mining in A River Stream—Rutsiro Case Study (Rwanda)
Forests 2020, 11(7), 762; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11070762 - 16 Jul 2020
Abstract
Artisanal and small-scale mining is a significant economic sector in Rwanda. Mining activities often use a watercourse, in which secondary extraction takes place and minerals are washed. Mining thus greatly affects the geomorphological conditions in the area. The aim of this paper is [...] Read more.
Artisanal and small-scale mining is a significant economic sector in Rwanda. Mining activities often use a watercourse, in which secondary extraction takes place and minerals are washed. Mining thus greatly affects the geomorphological conditions in the area. The aim of this paper is a digest of environmental impacts of alluvial artisanal and small-scale mining with a focus on anthropogenic influences on topography with regard to the methods used in raw material mining. The author draws on a case study from the mining site of Rutsiro district in Rwanda. Main findings of alluvial artisanal mining in a riverscape are changes in landscape structure, deforestation, intensification of geomorphological processes, new relief shapes (suffosion depressions, check dams, gravel benches, anthropogenic channels) and hydrological river regime, chemical pollution of soil and watercourses. Artisanal and small-scale mining may lead to a significant change and acceleration of fluvial processes. This paper covers a broad understanding of environmental impacts of alluvial artisanal and small-scale mining with a focus on anthropogenic influencing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity and Management of Temperate Floodplain Forests)
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Open AccessArticle
Comparison of Economic Efficiency of Management Systems with Prevailing Representation of Sessile Oak (Quercus petraea (Matt.) Liebl.) in the Territory of Křivoklátsko Forest Park (Czech Republic)
Forests 2020, 11(4), 447; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11040447 - 15 Apr 2020
Abstract
The objective of the article was to model the economic efficiency of coppice and compare it with that of an oak high forest (primarily for the territory of Křivoklátsko Forest Park). The model calculations were based on actual expenses and revenues from the [...] Read more.
The objective of the article was to model the economic efficiency of coppice and compare it with that of an oak high forest (primarily for the territory of Křivoklátsko Forest Park). The model calculations were based on actual expenses and revenues from the area of interest to the maximum possible extent. The calculations included methods both with time factor (dynamic methods, namely the method of net present value) and without time factor (static methods). For the area of Křivoklátsko Forest Park, the examined data showed that the economic efficiency of coppice could be greater than that of high forest or over-mature coppice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity and Management of Temperate Floodplain Forests)
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Open AccessArticle
Impact of Multiple Vegetation Covers on Surface Runoff and Sediment Yield in the Small Basin of Nverzhai, Hunan Province, China
Forests 2020, 11(3), 329; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030329 - 16 Mar 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
Vegetation plays a significant role in controlling soil erosion. However, the effects of each vegetation type on soil erosion have not been fully investigated. In order to explore the influence of multiple vegetation covers on soil erosion and surface runoff generation, 10 different [...] Read more.
Vegetation plays a significant role in controlling soil erosion. However, the effects of each vegetation type on soil erosion have not been fully investigated. In order to explore the influence of multiple vegetation covers on soil erosion and surface runoff generation, 10 different vegetation types, typical of the Nverzhai small basin, have been selected for this study. Regional precipitation, surface runoff, and sediment yield were measured from 2007 to 2018. The wettest year recorded was 2012. Recorded data confirmed that July was the wettest month in this region while January and December were the driest months. Furthermore, surface runoff and sediment yield associated with different vegetation types gradually decreased after 2013, which is the quantification of the consequences due to afforestation processes started in this area. Surface runoff and sediment content recorded for the configuration of sloping farmland were the largest between the different investigated vegetation types. The smallest were the broad-leaved mixed forest, the coniferous mixed forest, and shrubs. Finally, a significant linear positive correlation was found between rainfall and surface runoff, as well as sediment yield (R2 = 0.75). This suggests that climate change implications could be limited by using the more efficient vegetation covering. This research indicates that the ground cover is a key element in controlling soil and water loss, as well as vegetation measures, with high ground cover (i.e., broad-leaved trees). These measures should be strongly recommended for soil erosion control and surface runoff reduction. Moreover, these outcomes can be very helpful for vegetation restoration and water conservation strategies if implemented by local authorities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity and Management of Temperate Floodplain Forests)
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Open AccessArticle
Bird Communities in Urban Riparian Areas: Response to the Local- and Landscape-Scale Environmental Variables
Forests 2019, 10(8), 683; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10080683 - 13 Aug 2019
Abstract
Understanding how environmental changes driven by urbanization impact the biodiversity in urban riparian areas has great importance for landscape planning and river ecosystem conservation. There have been many studies on the response of bird communities to different environmental variables in urban parks; however, [...] Read more.
Understanding how environmental changes driven by urbanization impact the biodiversity in urban riparian areas has great importance for landscape planning and river ecosystem conservation. There have been many studies on the response of bird communities to different environmental variables in urban parks; however, although supporting some of the highest bird diversities, case studies in urban riparian areas remain limited. In existing research, few studies have considered the impact of both local waterfront characteristics and surrounding environmental variables at a larger scale. In this study, we selected birds as the indicator to clarify their response to both local- and landscape-scale environmental variables in riparian areas of Tsing river, Beijing, in terms of (a) vegetation composition, (b) human disturbance, (c) land cover, and (d) landscape connectivity. We hypothesized that birds with different biological characteristics may respond differently to environmental variables. Birds were then further grouped according to the habitat type, residential type, and feeding type. It turned out that the coverage of grass and the disturbance of pedestrians are the most influential variables. Besides, compared with the land cover and landscape connectivity, the total contribution of vegetation characteristics and human disturbance accounts for the main proportion of explained variance. Information pertaining to these environmental variables can provide evidence to support bird conservation efforts in urban areas, and the identified distance threshold provides a basis for future landscape connectivity assessments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biodiversity and Management of Temperate Floodplain Forests)
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