Nature’s Wealth: Valuing and Enhancing Forest Ecosystem Goods and Services

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Economics, Policy, and Social Science".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (15 October 2023) | Viewed by 3650

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Department of Regional Economics and the Environment, Faculty of Economics and Sociology, University of Lodz, POW No. 3/5, 90-255 Łódź, Poland
Interests: ecosystem services; ecosystem dynamics; ecosystem modelling; ecosystem assessment
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests are the origin of a wide spectrum of services. The benefits that people gain from forests can widely be defined as forest ecosystem services. Provisioning, regulating, supporting, and cultural services are generally accounted for as the four main groups of services that are provided by forest ecosystems.

More specifically, the provisioning services of the forest ecosystems, which include, but are not limited to, timber, fuelwood, and fodder, are tangible due to conventional methods in classical economics, as they have market prices or are at least partially traded in the market.  

However, most of the ecological services of forest ecosystems, which include regulating and supporting services, alongside cultural services, are of a non-market nature. Due to the lack of a market price to reflect the benefits they provide to society, and regardless of the tools and methods which are provided by classical economics, there is a crucial need to develop, introduce, and apply methods and techniques through which these services can be made tangible to people, practitioners, and decision makers.

The relative significance of different forest ecosystem services can be assessed by valuation methods, such that the associated findings enable us to set up priorities, inform decision makers, allocate financial resources, and, more importantly, manage trade-offs among ecosystem services and potential conflicts among their beneficiaries or users. Obviously, the lack of an appropriate ecosystem service valuation and not applying the findings of an ecosystem service valuation in decision making may cause the over-exploitation of forest ecosystems that supply these services.

Aiming to fill out the gap, at least partly, this Special Issue of Forests, affiliated with MDPI, under the title of “Nature’s Wealth: Valuing and Enhancing Forest Ecosystem Goods and Services”, invites academicians, scientists, and experts in this subject to contribute to our knowledge and understanding on forest ecosystem services by sending us their manuscripts to be published in this Special Issue upon undergoing the reviewing process.

Prof. Dr. Bahman Jabbarian Amiri
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest
  • ecosystem services
  • ecosystem goods
  • valuation
  • decision making

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 6200 KiB  
Article
Detecting the Spatial Matching Relationship between Supply-Side and Demand-Side of Recreation Ecosystem Services (RES) from the Perspectives of Resource, Management, and Beneficiary: A Case Study in Yangmingshan National Park
by Bau-Show Lin and Han-Chin Chang
Forests 2022, 13(11), 1849; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13111849 - 4 Nov 2022
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1056
Abstract
Recreation ecosystem services (RES) link closely to human well-being and might mutually benefit biodiversity conservation while well managed. However, assessing and detecting the spatial matching of RES remains challenging. This study considered the nature of RES supply-side and demand-side in assessing and detecting [...] Read more.
Recreation ecosystem services (RES) link closely to human well-being and might mutually benefit biodiversity conservation while well managed. However, assessing and detecting the spatial matching of RES remains challenging. This study considered the nature of RES supply-side and demand-side in assessing and detecting the spatial matching relationship from the resource, management, and beneficiary perspectives. The proposed method consisted of assessment and overlay analysis parts. RES Supply Potential and Recreation Accessibility were assessed from the resource and management perspectives. RES Demand Potential, RES Flow, and RES Match/Mismatch were assessed from the beneficiary perspective. An overlay analysis was then conducted to examine the spatial relationship between the RES Match/Mismatch and the resource supply and management status to provide specific management information for protected areas. For the Yangmingshan National Park (YNP) in Taiwan, as a case study, this study revealed four RES Match/Mismatch levels in YNP, including MM+2 (RES Demand Potential ≫ RES Flow), MM+1 (RES Demand Potential > RES Flow), M (RES Demand Potential ≈ RES Flow), and MM−1 (RES demand Potential < RES flow). Only 5.51% of YNP belonged to M, where the areas’ RES Demand Potential were close to RES Flow and mainly located in Zone SA (Scenic Area). MM−1, where the areas were over-visited, accounted for 7.12% and were mainly located in Zones SA and EUA (Existing Use Area). As a protected area, most areas of YNP were with high RES Supply Potential; and were mainly located in MM+2 (70.87%) and MM+1 (16.50%), where the areas’ RES Demand Potential much greater or greater than RES Flow and the Recreation Accessibility were low. MM−1 were the areas where the managers should first launch actions to avoid or minimize over-visited impacts. The proposed method could detect RES Match/Mismatch rationally and directly and obtain multiple spatial datasets to support decision-making. Full article
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15 pages, 3499 KiB  
Article
Social Media as Support Channels in Communication with Society on Sustainable Forest Management
by Kamila Słupińska, Marek Wieruszewski, Piotr Szczypa, Anna Kożuch and Krzysztof Adamowicz
Forests 2022, 13(10), 1696; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13101696 - 15 Oct 2022
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Abstract
This article deals with the issue of using social media to promote sustainable forest management. Major forest managers see significant value in combining various social media channels and implementing a communication campaign. With the help of social media, it is possible to raise [...] Read more.
This article deals with the issue of using social media to promote sustainable forest management. Major forest managers see significant value in combining various social media channels and implementing a communication campaign. With the help of social media, it is possible to raise public awareness of rational forest management. The purpose of this research was to conduct an in-depth theoretical and research analysis of the use of increasingly common communication channels such as social media. The research and analysis period was set from 1–26 July 2018. In order to evaluate the effectiveness of communication activities, the social media survey was repeated from 1–21 January 2019 and from 1–21 July 2020. The control analysis focused on the use of the main social media channels. The article assumed the hypothesis of conscious actions in the communication of forest management institutions in social media to communicate the rational use of forest resources. The hypothesis was positively verified on the basis of quantitative and qualitative studies of nonparticipatory observation for selected social media (Facebook, Instagram) and analysis of data contained in social media channels. The pilot study was conducted on 45 forestry entities from Poland. The results of the survey indicate the growing use of social media to communicate with the public about forest management. The dominant share of respondents consider social media as effective channels for forest education. Facebook is the most popular channel for conducting dialogue with the public. The results of the qualitative survey confirm the superiority of a graphic or mixed form of information presentation over the written form alone. This confirms the observed trends of increasing use of infographics, especially in communication with younger generations. Full article
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