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Special Issue "Impact of Global Change on Soil Carbon Storage and Biogeochemical Cycles in Tropical Forest Ecosystems"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2019)

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Clément Stahl

INRA, UMR EcoFoG, CNRS, Cirad, AgroParisTech, Université des Antilles, Université de Guyane, 97310 Kourou, France.
Website | E-Mail
Interests: soil carbon storage; forest carbon cycling; ecophysiology; micrometeorology; gas exchange; tree physiology
Guest Editor
Dr. Laetitia Brechet

University of Antwerp, Department of Biology, Plants and Ecosystems research group (PLECO) at Centre of Excellence Global Change Ecology, Universiteitsplein 1, B-2610 Wilrijk, Belgium
Website 1 | Website 2 | E-Mail
Interests: Biological processes of carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) dynamics controlling forest ecosystem functioning; Climate change effects on forest C cycling; Forest ecosystems; Forest greenhouse gas, i.e. CO2, CH4, and N2O, fluxes; Plant-soil relationships and decomposition processes; Tree ecophysiology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last few years, responses of tropical forests to global change have received increasing attention, underlying the sensitivity of this ecosystem to temperature rise, precipitation regime modifications and increased atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2). Furthermore, the extremely high tropical tree diversity also showed a large panel of responses to global change. However, less attention was done on how global change, i.e., increased of drought, temperature, CO2 and nitrogen (N) deposition, influences the belowground compartment, while it shows a main role in carbon (C) sink and biogeochemical cycles. In light of the recent COP21 Paris Agreement, it is essential to better understand the impacts of global change on soil C stock and storage to determine the level of climate mitigation required to achieve the agreed temperature goals. Tropical forests are currently subject to different antagonist processes which disrupt the soil C storage and alter the soil greenhouse gas (GHG) fluxes, creating a potential feedback mechanism for climate change.

The articles in this Special Issue will contribute to increasing our knowledge on the main environmental drivers, and their interactions, that are behind tropical forest soil functioning, including microorganism activities, stoichiometry diversity, soil–plant interactions and carbon storage mechanisms.

Dr. Clément Stahl
Dr. Laetitia Brechet
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Drought
  • Extreme events
  • Soil-plant interactions
  • Soil carbon storage
  • Stoichiometry
  • Nutrient constraints
  • Greenhouse gas fluxes

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Atypical Pattern of Soil Carbon Stocks along the Slope Position in a Seasonally Dry Tropical Forest in Thailand
Forests 2019, 10(2), 106; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020106
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 16 January 2019 / Accepted: 24 January 2019 / Published: 29 January 2019
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Abstract
The pattern of soil carbon stock is atypical along the slope position in a seasonally dry tropical forest; the mean stock values increase from the lower, middle, to upper slopes, at 11.5, 13.2, and 15.5 kg m−2, respectively. In sloping landscapes, [...] Read more.
The pattern of soil carbon stock is atypical along the slope position in a seasonally dry tropical forest; the mean stock values increase from the lower, middle, to upper slopes, at 11.5, 13.2, and 15.5 kg m−2, respectively. In sloping landscapes, soil organic carbon tends to accumulate in lower slopes, but our previous soil respiration study suggested that soil carbon stock distribution along the slope position in seasonally dry tropical forests is atypical. The aims of this study were: (i) to examine whether the atypical pattern occurs widely in the watershed; and (ii) to examine the pattern of root development in the soil profile as a source of soil carbon. The density and stock of soil carbon in three soil layers (0–10, 10–30, and 30–100 cm) of 13 soil profiles were compared in different positions on the slope (upper, middle, and lower). Root biomass at each slope position was also determined. Soil carbon density in each layer increased significantly with an increase in the relative position of the slopes, particularly in the 10–30 cm soil layer. The density of medium root (3–10 mm in diameter) in the upper slopes was significantly higher than that in the middle and lower slopes, especially for 15–60 cm soil layers. The atypical pattern of soil carbon accumulation along the slope position occurred widely in the studied watershed and appeared to be caused by the development of root systems in deeply weathered soil under xeric soil conditions in the upper slopes. Roots of bamboo undergrowth may also contribute to soil carbon stabilization by reducing soil erosion in the surface soil. Full article
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Open AccessArticle Interactions between Vegetation, Hydrology, and Litter Inputs on Decomposition and Soil CO2 Efflux of Tropical Forests in the Brazilian Pantanal
Forests 2018, 9(5), 281; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9050281
Received: 26 February 2018 / Revised: 7 May 2018 / Accepted: 18 May 2018 / Published: 22 May 2018
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Abstract
Climate change has the capacity to alter water availability and the litter production of tropical forests, which will alter rates of carbon (C) cycling and storage. We conducted a short-term field experiment in two hydrologically diverse forests in the Brazilian Pantanal to assess [...] Read more.
Climate change has the capacity to alter water availability and the litter production of tropical forests, which will alter rates of carbon (C) cycling and storage. We conducted a short-term field experiment in two hydrologically diverse forests in the Brazilian Pantanal to assess the initial response of litter decomposition and soil respiration (Rsoil) to variations in litter pool size. Total annual Rsoil and decomposition significantly declined with litter removal and increased with litter addition, but the rate of litter decomposition was highest for plots where litter was removed. Rsoil was positively related to soil organic matter content and the rate of litter decomposition, but not soil moisture or temperature, suggesting that the litter treatment effects on decomposition and Rsoil were due to changes in C availability and not litter effects on the soil environment (i.e., temperature and moisture). Rsoil was not significantly different between the forests studied here even though they had large differences in hydrology; however, litter decomposition was significantly higher in seasonally flooded forest, especially when augmented with litter. These results suggest that alterations in litter production from land use and/or climate change will alter short-term rates of decomposition and Rsoil for these and other floodplain forests of the Pantanal and Amazon Basin. Full article
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Graphical abstract

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