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Special Issue "Influence of Climate Change on Tree Growth and Forest Ecosystems"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 25 June 2019

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Juan A. Blanco

Dep. Ciencias, Universidad Publica de Navarra Campus de Arrosadia, Pamplona, Navarra, 31006, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: forest ecology; ecological models; nutrient cycling; climate change; sustainable forest management
Guest Editor
Dr. Yueh-Hsin Lo

Dep. Ciencias, Universidad Publica de Navarra Campus de Arrosadia, Pamplona, Navarra, 31006, Spain
E-Mail
Interests: ecological modelling; dendroclimatology; forest management; climate change; forest ecology
Guest Editor
Dr. Ester González-de-Andrés

Dep. Ciencias, Universidad Publica de Navarra Campus de Arrosadia, Pamplona, Navarra, 31006, Spain
E-Mail
Interests: forest ecology; ecosystem modeling; dendrochronology; data analysis; climate change

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Recent research has shown that climate change is already altering tree species ranges, mortality and growth rates. Recent analyses of the potential effects of climate change on tree growth in Europe and America have suggested that important timber species may lose suitable habitat and suffer adversely from a combination of warming trends and reduced growing season precipitation. In contrast, other species may actually expand their range and potentially show improved growth rates in parts of their existing range, or show potential for their use as commercial species in new regions. Research has uncovered species-specific growth responses to climate change. In addition, the complex interactions between tree growth and temperature, water, nutrients, and carbon dioxide are also modulated by inter- and intra-specific competition levels. The state-of-the-art currently focuses on understanding how forest ecosystems, and not only tree species, could respond to climate change. On this respect, the potential resilience of mixed forests towards changes in growing conditions could also be used to adapt forest management to the novel growing conditions that are slowly but steadily unfolding. Therefore, advancing the current knowledge of how climate change can influence tree growth and forest ecosystems is the focus of this Special Issue.

Dr. Juan A. Blanco
Dr. Yueh-Hsin Lo
Dr. Ester González-de-Andrés
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • tree growth and development
  • climate change and mixed forests
  • influence of climate on forest functioning
  • influence of climate on forest structure
  • climate change and disturbances on forests
  • dendroclimatology
  • dendroecology
  • ecosystem-level forest modelling

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Modeling the Effect of Climate Change on the Potential Distribution of Qinghai Spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom.) in Qilian Mountains
Forests 2019, 10(1), 62; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10010062
Received: 9 November 2018 / Revised: 9 January 2019 / Accepted: 12 January 2019 / Published: 14 January 2019
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Abstract
Qinghai spruce forests play a key role in water conservation in the dry region of northwest China. So, it is necessary to understand the impacts of climate change on the species to implement adaptation strategies. Based on the four-emission scenario (i.e., RCP2.6 (Representative [...] Read more.
Qinghai spruce forests play a key role in water conservation in the dry region of northwest China. So, it is necessary to understand the impacts of climate change on the species to implement adaptation strategies. Based on the four-emission scenario (i.e., RCP2.6 (Representative Concentration Pathway), RCP4.5, RCP6.0 and RCP8.5) set by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) fifth assessment report, in the study, we predicted the potential distribution of Qinghai spruce (Picea crassifolia Kom.) under current and future scenarios using a maximum entropy (Maxent) model. Seven variables, selected from 22 variables according to correlation analysis combining with their contribution rates to the distribution, are used to simulate the potential distribution of the species under current and future scenarios. Simulated results are validated by area under the operating characteristic curve (AUC). Results demonstrate that elevation, mean temperature of wettest quarter, annual mean temperature, and mean diurnal range are more important in dominating the potential distribution of Qinghai spruce. Ratios of the suitable area to the total study area are 34.3% in current climate condition, 34% in RCP2.6, 33.9% in RCP4.5, 33.8% in RCP6.0, and 30.5% in RCP8.5, respectively. The warmer the climate condition is, the more area of higher suitable classification is changed to that of lower suitable classification. The ratios of real distribution area in simulated unsuitable class to the real distribution area change from 4.3% (60.7 km2) in the current climate to 13% (185 km2) in RCP8.5, suggesting that the real distribution area may decrease in the future. We conclude that there is a negative effect of climate change on the distribution of Qinghai spruce forest. The result can help decision-makers to draft adaptation countermeasures based on climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Influence of Climate Change on Tree Growth and Forest Ecosystems)
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Open AccessArticle Hierarchical Environmental Factors Affecting the Distribution of Abies koreana on the Korean Peninsula
Forests 2018, 9(12), 777; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9120777
Received: 22 October 2018 / Revised: 10 December 2018 / Accepted: 11 December 2018 / Published: 16 December 2018
PDF Full-text (1702 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
A regional decline in the Korean fir (Abies koreana) has been observed since the 1980s in the subalpine region. To explain this decline, it is important to investigate the degree to which environmental factors have contributed to plant distributions on diverse [...] Read more.
A regional decline in the Korean fir (Abies koreana) has been observed since the 1980s in the subalpine region. To explain this decline, it is important to investigate the degree to which environmental factors have contributed to plant distributions on diverse spatial scales. We applied a hierarchical regression model to determine quantitatively the relationship between the abundance of Korean fir (seedlings) and diverse environmental factors across two different ecological scales. We measured Korean fir density and the occurrence of its seedlings in 102 (84) plots nested at five sites and collected a range of environmental factors at the same plots. Our model included hierarchical explanatory variables at both site-level (weather conditions) and plot-level (micro-topographic factors, soil properties, and competing species). The occurrence of Korean fir seedlings was positively associated with moss cover and rock cover but negatively related to dwarf bamboo cover. At the site level, winter precipitation was significantly and positively related to the occurrence of seedlings. A hierarchical Poisson regression model revealed that Korean fir density was negatively associated with slope aspect, topographic position index, Quercus mongolica cover, and mean summer temperature. Our results suggest that rising temperature, drought, and competition with other species are factors that impede the survival of the Korean fir. We can predict that the population of Korean fir will continue to decline in the subalpine, and only a few Korean fir will survive on northern slopes or valleys due to climate change. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Influence of Climate Change on Tree Growth and Forest Ecosystems)
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