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Special Issue "Molecular Mechanisms in Wood/Cork Formation and Develop Molecular Strategies to Support Selection and Breeding"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecophysiology and Biology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 June 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Jorge Paiva

Institute of Plant Genetics of the Polish Academy of Sciences, 34 Strzeszynska street, PL-60-479 Poznan, Wielkopolska, PL-60-479, Poland
Website | E-Mail
Interests: Transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of secondary cell wall biosynthesis; woody plants; response to abiotic and biotic stress; bioenergy; biodiversity of forest crops

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Forests currently occupy one third of the terrestrial surface. They play a major ecological role in biodiversity, soil protection against erosion and desertification, the preservation of water resources, and the balance and sequestration of carbon. Forests play also a major socio-economic role, as a source of natural and renewable products for different end uses and as services for local populations and associated industries, such as wood and cork.  

Over the last decade, the use of different omics strategies has revealed new knowledge associated with the molecular mechanisms regulating the formation and quality of wood and cork. The current and increased demand for high quality wood and cork needs to cope with the challenges imposed by the different scenarios of climate change. Thus, it is of the upmost importance to translate the knowledge gathered regarding the regulation of wood and cork formation into new molecular strategies, so as to support and accelerate for efficient forest selection and breeding.  

This Special Issue aims at providing an update on the last achievements addressing the molecular regulation of wood and cork formation, and on the molecular resources, tools, and methodologies available to support selection and breeding towards for the sustainable production of wood and cork in the frame of new challenges derived the global climate change. High quality and multidisciplinary original research or review articles, as well as research notes, are welcomed. 

Dr. Jorge Paiva
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Xylogenesis
  • Cork
  • Wood
  • Tree breeding
  • Climate change

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle Identification and Analysis of microRNAs in the SAM and Leaves of Populus tomentosa
Forests 2019, 10(2), 130; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020130
Received: 12 December 2018 / Revised: 3 February 2019 / Accepted: 4 February 2019 / Published: 6 February 2019
PDF Full-text (3411 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is a crucial tissue located at the tops of plants which can continually grow and differentiate to develop into all aboveground parts. SAM development is controlled by a series of complicated molecular regulation networks, among which microRNAs (miRNAs) [...] Read more.
The shoot apical meristem (SAM) is a crucial tissue located at the tops of plants which can continually grow and differentiate to develop into all aboveground parts. SAM development is controlled by a series of complicated molecular regulation networks, among which microRNAs (miRNAs) and their target genes play key roles. However, little is known about these miRNAs in woody plants. In this study, we used small RNA (sRNA) sequencing to build four libraries derived from shoot tips and mature leaf tissues of Populus tomentosa, and identified 99 known miRNA families. In addition, 193 known miRNAs, including phytohormone-, developmental-, and cellular process-related miRNAs, showed significant differential expression. Interestingly, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of miR172, miR164, and miR393 expression showed marked changes in expression patterns during the development of shoot tips. The target genes of these miRNAs were involved in the regulation of hormone responses and stem cell function. In particular, the miR172 target APETALA2 (AP2), involved in the maintenance of stem cells in the shoot apex, was expressed specifically during the initial active stage of development. These findings provide new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of miRNAs involved in SAM development and differentiation in tree species. Full article
Figures

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Open AccessArticle De Novo Transcriptome Analysis of Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen (Fabaceae) and Transferability of SSR Markers Developed from the Transcriptome
Forests 2019, 10(2), 98; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10020098
Received: 15 December 2018 / Revised: 23 January 2019 / Accepted: 24 January 2019 / Published: 26 January 2019
PDF Full-text (828 KB) | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen (Fabaceae), indigenous to Hainan Island, is a precious rosewood (Hainan hualimu) in China. However, only limited genomic information is available which has resulted in a lack of molecular markers, limiting the development and utilization of the germplasm resources. In [...] Read more.
Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen (Fabaceae), indigenous to Hainan Island, is a precious rosewood (Hainan hualimu) in China. However, only limited genomic information is available which has resulted in a lack of molecular markers, limiting the development and utilization of the germplasm resources. In this study, we aim to enrich genomic information of D. odorifera, and develop a series of transferable simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for Dalbergia species. Therefore, we performed transcriptome sequencing for D. odorifera by pooling leaf tissues from three trees. A dataset of 138,516,418 reads was identified and assembled into 115,292 unigenes. Moreover, 35,774 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified as potential SSR markers. A set of 19 SSR markers was successfully transferred across species of Dalbergia odorifera T. Chen, Dalbergia tonkinensis Prain, and Dalbergia cochinchinensis Pierre ex Laness. In total, 112 alleles (3–13 alleles/locus) were presented among 60 Dalbergia trees, and polymorphic information content ranged from 0.38 to 0.75. The mean observed and mean expected heterozygosity was 0.34 and 0.40 in D. odorifera, 0.27 and 0.32 in D. tonkinensis, and 0.29 and 0.33 in D. cochinchinensis, respectively. The cluster analysis classified these 60 trees into three major groups according to the three Dalbergia species based on the genetic similarity coefficients, indicating these newly developed transferable markers can be used to explore the relationships among Dalbergia species and assist genetic research. All these unigenes and SSR markers will be useful for breeding programs in the future. Full article
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