Special Issue "Analysis of Microbial Diversity and Greenhouse Gas Production of Forest Decomposition"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 20 September 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Roberta Pastorelli
Website
Guest Editor
Consiglio per la Ricerca in Agricoltura e l'Analisi dell'Economia Agraria, Centro di Ricerca Agricoltura e Ambiente (CREA-AA), via di Lanciola, 12/A, 50125 Firenze, Italy
Interests: microbial ecology; soil; deadwood; litter
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Microorganisms are key players in the decomposition of residue and detritus materials in forests. With their metabolic activity, microorganisms largely contribute to carbon (C) balance and nutrient availability in these ecosystems. Microbial decomposition activity also causes the subsequent release of carbon dioxide (CO2), as well as nitrous oxide (N2O) and methane (CH4). Climate warming is expected to increase the microbial heterotrophic metabolism leading to enhanced greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from forests. Thus, forest ecosystems are becoming an important part of worldwide greenhouse gas-related climate change research activities.

However, the specific environmental factors affecting GHG-producing microbial communities are poorly understood. Therefore, investigations into the drivers that shape microbial communities and influence decomposition processes are essential for the prediction of the forest response to future environmental conditions.

More attention has been paid to fungi and bacteria biodiversity and their roles in forest ecosystems. In recent years, even Archaea have proven to be an integral and dynamic component of forest decomposing microbiota, but the exact extent of their contribution still remains unclear.

This Special Issue will present novel research that could help the scientific community to understand the involvement of microbial communities in GHG emissions in forest ecosystems. We encourage the submission of experimental studies, monitoring approaches, and theoretical models to promote knowledge on the dependence of GHG production rates, along with the abundance and composition of microbial communities, in order to help with the planning of forest strategies for climate change mitigation.

Dr. Roberta Pastorelli
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Microbial diversity
  • Greenhouse gas emission
  • Litter decomposition
  • Deadwood decomposition
  • Soil respiration

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Root Litter Mixing with That of Japanese Cedar Altered CO2 Emissions from Moso Bamboo Forest Soil
Forests 2020, 11(3), 356; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030356 - 21 Mar 2020
Abstract
Research Highlights: This study examined the effect of mixing fine roots of Japanese cedar with moso bamboo on soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions with nitrogen (N) addition treatment. Background and Objectives: Moso bamboo expansion into adjacent forests and N deposition are [...] Read more.
Research Highlights: This study examined the effect of mixing fine roots of Japanese cedar with moso bamboo on soil carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions with nitrogen (N) addition treatment. Background and Objectives: Moso bamboo expansion into adjacent forests and N deposition are common in subtropical China. The effects of litter input on soil CO2 emissions, especially fine root litter input, are crucial to evaluate contribution of moso bamboo expansion on greenhouse gas emissions. Materials and Methods: An in situ study over 12 months was conducted to examine mixing fine roots of Japanese cedar with moso bamboo on soil CO2 emissions with simulated N deposition. Results: Fine root litter input of Japanese cedar and moso bamboo both impacted soil CO2 emission rates, with mixed litter, positively impact soil CO2 emission rate with N addition treatment. Moso bamboo fine root litter input decreased the sensitivity of soil CO2 emission rate to soil temperature. Conclusions: The encroachment of moso bamboo into adjacent forests might benefit soil C sequestration under warming climate, which will also benefit the mitigation of global climate change. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Effects of Elevated CO2 Concentration and Nitrogen Addition on Soil Respiration in a Cd-Contaminated Experimental Forest Microcosm
Forests 2020, 11(3), 260; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11030260 - 27 Feb 2020
Abstract
Forests near rapidly industrialized and urbanized regions are often exposed to elevated CO2, increased N deposition, and heavy metal pollution. To date, the effects of elevated CO2 and/or increased N deposition on soil respiration (Rs) under heavy metal contamination are [...] Read more.
Forests near rapidly industrialized and urbanized regions are often exposed to elevated CO2, increased N deposition, and heavy metal pollution. To date, the effects of elevated CO2 and/or increased N deposition on soil respiration (Rs) under heavy metal contamination are unclear. In this study, we firstly investigated Rs in Cd-contaminated model forests with CO2 enrichment and N addition in subtropical China. Results showed that Rs in all treatments exhibited similar clear seasonal patterns, with soil temperature being a dominant control. Cadmium addition significantly decreased cumulative soil CO2 efflux by 19% compared to the control. The inhibition of Rs caused by Cd addition was increased by N addition (decreased by 34%) was partially offset by elevated CO2 (decreased by 15%), and was not significantly altered by the combined N addition and rising CO2. Soil pH, microbial biomass carbon, carbon-degrading hydrolytic enzymes, and fine root biomass were also significantly altered by the treatments. A structural equation model revealed that the responses of Rs to Cd stress, elevated CO2, and N addition were mainly mediated by soil carbon-degrading hydrolytic enzymes and fine root biomass. Overall, our findings indicate that N deposition may exacerbate the negative effect of Cd on Rs in Cd-contaminated forests and benefit soil carbon sequestration in the future at increasing atmospheric CO2 levels. Full article
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