Special Issue "Planted Forests and Climate Change—Selected Papers from the IUFRO 125th Anniversary Congress"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (11 August 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Christophe Orazio
E-Mail Website1 Website2
Guest Editor
EFI Atlantic European Regional Office, CESTAS, France
Interests: planted forest; forest adaptation to climate change; forest management; integrated risk management in forest; tools decision makers in forest sector; REINFFORCE infrastructure
Dr. Elena Paoletti
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
IPSP-CNR in Sesto Fiorentino, Florence, Italy
Dr. Margarida Tomé
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Forest Research Centre, School of Agriculture, University of Lisbon, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017, Lisboa, Portugal

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Planted forests, as other forests, will be significantly affected by climate change, as described by other guest editors. Plantations offer the opportunity to have more influence on the regeneration process than with natural regeneration. A better reactivity also means an increased responsibility of forest manager making decisions in a highly uncertain environment. The intensity of global change at a global level is uncertain as it is driven by political process, such as COP21 and innovation for a fossil carbon free economy. At a local level, whatever climate scenarios we consider, to have an accurate estimate on how climate will evolve in the next decades, and to know how it will affect the survival of trees, the growth and health of our forests are extremely difficult. Thus, as in planted forests human decisions orient a lot future ecosystem services, we need to provide information to decision makers about the climatic uncertainties, the adaptability of genetic resources, the best management options to improve stand resilience and cope with future climate in a given area. In addition, we need to be able to quantify the risk associated to  choices made in order to add value to empirical decisions. Thus, climate/site/genetic interactions have to be more accurately explored and infrastructures for research on adaptation to climate change need to be further developed.

Dr. Christophe Orazio
Dr. Elena Paoletti
Dr. Margarida Tomé

Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

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Keywords

  • Tree species selection (site/climate/genetic interaction)
  • Multirisk analysis
  • Integrated Risk management
  • Sustainability and risk indicators
  • Decision tools for Forest Management and decision-makers

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Effect of Long-Term vs. Short-Term Ambient Ozone Exposure on Radial Stem Growth, Sap Flux and Xylem Morphology of O3-Sensitive Poplar Trees
Forests 2019, 10(5), 396; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10050396 - 07 May 2019
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 1114
Abstract
High ozone (O3) pollution impairs the carbon and water balance of trees, which is of special interest in planted forests. However, the effect of long-term O3 exposure on tree growth and water use, little remains known. In this study, we [...] Read more.
High ozone (O3) pollution impairs the carbon and water balance of trees, which is of special interest in planted forests. However, the effect of long-term O3 exposure on tree growth and water use, little remains known. In this study, we analysed the relationships of intra-annual stem growth pattern, seasonal sap flow dynamics and xylem morphology to assess the effect of long term O3 exposure of mature O3-sensitive hybrid poplars (‘Oxford’ clone). Rooted cuttings were planted in autumn 2007 and drip irrigated with 2 liters of water as ambient O3 treatment, or 450 ppm ethylenediurea (N-[2-(2-oxo-1-imidazolidinyl)ethyl]-N0-phenylurea, abbreviated as EDU) solution as O3 protection treatment over all growing seasons. During 2013, point dendrometers and heat pulses were installed to monitor radial growth, stem water relations and sap flow. Ambient O3 did not affect growth rates, even if the seasonal culmination point was 20 days earlier on average than that recorded in the O3 protected trees. Under ambient O3, trees showed reduced seasonal sap flow, however, the lower water use was due to a decrease of Huber value (decrease of leaf area for sapwood unit) rather than to a change in xylem morphology or due to a direct effect of sluggish stomatal responses on transpiration. Under high evaporative demand and ambient O3 concentrations, trees showed a high use of internal stem water resources modulated by stomatal sluggishness, thus predisposing them to be more sensitive water deficit during summer. The results of this study help untangle the compensatory mechanisms involved in the acclimation processes of forest species to long-term O3 exposure in a context of global change. Full article
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Article
Effects of Douglas Fir Stand Age on Soil Chemical Properties, Nutrient Dynamics, and Enzyme Activity: A Case Study in Northern Apennines, Italy
Forests 2018, 9(10), 641; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9100641 - 13 Oct 2018
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1449
Abstract
The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a Douglas fir plantation along a stand chronosequence in the North Apennine (Italy) on soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as on soil chemical and biochemical properties involved in the nutrients [...] Read more.
The aim of this study was to determine the effect of a Douglas fir plantation along a stand chronosequence in the North Apennine (Italy) on soil carbon and nitrogen stocks, as well as on soil chemical and biochemical properties involved in the nutrients biogeochemical cycle. In 2014, three sites of Douglas fir stands, aged 80, 100, and 120 years, were selected in Vallombrosa forest to study the dynamics of soil nutrients in the ecosystem. Along the Douglas fir chronosequence, general evidence of surface element accumulation was found, including a conspicuous increase of alkaline element with respect to Al, which was attributed to the increase of soil pH along the Douglas fir stand age classes. A general increase of specific enzyme activity (per unit of organic carbon) and functional diversity were observed in the epipedon of the Douglas fir stand over 100 years of age. Moreover, the (chitinase + leucine aminopeptidase) to acid phosphatase ratio progressively increased from 0.15 to 0.31 in the epipedon of the chrononsequence, while the β-glucosidase to (chitinase + leucine aminopeptidase) ratio decreased from 1.45 to 0.83, suggesting nitrogen limitation with respect to carbon. In fact, the soil carbon stock progressively increased along the chronosequence, in the epipedon from 17 to 53 Mg C ha−1 and in the endopedon from 17 to 37 Mg C ha−1. Conversely, the soil nitrogen stock increased from 1.2 to 2.4 Mg N ha−1, but not over the 100-year-old stand class. In conclusion, soil organic matter accumulation became sufficient to define the umbric horizon in the Northern Apennines when the Douglas fir plantation reached the age of 100 years. Over this age class of plants, a limitation of soil nitrogen may occur, affecting enzyme activities regulating the biogeochemical cycle of nutrients. Full article
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Article
Early Survival and Growth Plasticity of 33 Species Planted in 38 Arboreta across the European Atlantic Area
Forests 2018, 9(10), 630; https://doi.org/10.3390/f9100630 - 11 Oct 2018
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 1805
Abstract
To anticipate European climate scenarios for the end of the century, we explored the climate gradient within the REINFFORCE (RÉseau INFrastructure de recherche pour le suivi et l’adaptation des FORêts au Changement climatiquE) arboreta network, established in 38 sites between latitudes 37° and [...] Read more.
To anticipate European climate scenarios for the end of the century, we explored the climate gradient within the REINFFORCE (RÉseau INFrastructure de recherche pour le suivi et l’adaptation des FORêts au Changement climatiquE) arboreta network, established in 38 sites between latitudes 37° and 57°, where 33 tree species are represented. We aim to determine which climatic variables best explain their survival and growth, and identify those species that are more tolerant of climate variation and those of which the growth and survival future climate might constrain. We used empirical models to determine the best climatic predictor variables that explain tree survival and growth. Precipitation-transfer distance was most important for the survival of broadleaved species, whereas growing-season-degree days best explained conifer-tree survival. Growth (annual height increment) was mainly explained by a derived annual dryness index (ADI) for both conifers and broadleaved trees. Species that showed the greatest variation in survival and growth in response to climatic variation included Betula pendula Roth, Pinus elliottii Engelm., and Thuja plicata Donn ex D.Don, and those that were least affected included Quercus shumardii Buckland and Pinus nigra J.F.Arnold. We also demonstrated that provenance differences were significant for Pinus pinea L., Quercus robur L., and Ceratonia siliqua L. Here, we demonstrate the usefulness of infrastructures along a climatic gradient like REINFFORCE to determine major tendencies of tree species responding to climate changes. Full article
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Review

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Review
Tropical and Highland Temperate Forest Plantations in Mexico: Pathways for Climate Change Mitigation and Ecosystem Services Delivery
Forests 2017, 8(12), 489; https://doi.org/10.3390/f8120489 - 09 Dec 2017
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3317
Abstract
Forest plantations are a possible way of increasing forest productivity in temperate and tropical forests, and therefore also increasing above- and belowground carbon pools. In the context of climate change, monospecific plantations might become an alternative to mitigate global warming; however, their contribution [...] Read more.
Forest plantations are a possible way of increasing forest productivity in temperate and tropical forests, and therefore also increasing above- and belowground carbon pools. In the context of climate change, monospecific plantations might become an alternative to mitigate global warming; however, their contribution to the structural complexity, complementarity, and biodiversity of forests has not been addressed. Mixed forest plantations can ensure that objectives of climate change mitigation are met through carbon sequestration, while also delivering anticipated ecosystem services (e.g., nutrient cycling, erosion control, and wildlife habitat). However, mixed forest plantations pose considerable operational challenges and research opportunities. For example, it is essential to know how many species or functional traits are necessary to deliver a set of benefits, or what mixture of species and densities are key to maintaining productive plantations and delivering multiple ecosystem services. At the same time, the establishment of forest plantations in Mexico should not be motivated solely by timber production. Forest plantations should also increase carbon sequestration, maintain biodiversity, and provide other ecosystem services. This article analyzes some matters that affect the development of planted forests in the Mexican national context, and presents alternatives for forest resources management through the recommendation of mixed forest plantations as a means of contributing to climate change mitigation and the delivery of ecosystem services. Full article
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