Special Issue "Growth and Allocation of Woody Biomass in Forest Trees Based on Environmental Conditions"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Dr. Luigi Todaro Website E-Mail
School of Agricultural, Forestry, Food and Environmental Science (SAFE), University of Basilicata, V.le dell’Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: wood characterization; sustainability; natural resource management; wood modification
Guest Editor
Dr. Angelo Rita Website E-Mail
School of Agricultural, Forestry, Food, and Environmental Sciences, University of Basilicata, V.le Ateneo Lucano 10, 85100 Potenza, Italy
Interests: plant ecology; tree growth; wood anatomy; dendrochronology; drought stress
Guest Editor
Dr. Alessio Collalti Website E-Mail
Institute for Agricultural and Forestry Systems in the Mediterranean (ISAFOM-CNR). National Research Council of Italy, Via Cavour, 4-6 87036, Rende (CS) Italy
Interests: tree ecophysiology; forest modelling; biogeochemical cycles; silviculture; stand dynamics; carbon sequestration; forest ecology; climate change impacts; adaptation; mitigation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Terrestrial ecosystems, and forests in particular, are important components because of their key role in reducing atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations by storing a large amount of carbon in biomass and soils. Increasing attention is being paid to forestland area, which accounts for 30% of the total land surface and acts as the main C store in the land system. In their life cycle, plants uptake, process, allocate, and remobilize resources from the environment, including basic materials, such as CO2, water, and nutrients, and other materials, such as sugars, proteins, and defensive chemicals. The relative amount of above- and belowground biomass allocated among leaves, branches, stems, roots, and reproductive tissues is a functional indicator of the forest stand and reflects the material flow, the wood quality, a plant’s survival strategy, and the primary production processes. The way in which plants share their labile products across their compartments is influenced by plant size and is not fixed but likely varies over time, across growth environments, and among species. It follows that the whole allocation process would be modulated under strong natural selection. Obtaining a qualitative/quantitative understanding of the influence that these factors have on growth and biomass allocation is of fundamental importance for both understanding plant ecology and evolution and developing environmental policies and forest management practices, such as:

- sequestration to increase stocks in more recalcitrant woody carbon pools, characterized by a slow build-up of carbon with a potentially slower release of carbon to the atmosphere;

- conservation to prevent emissions from existing forest carbon pools in regions with high C stocks and where natural disturbances are less frequent to cause large immediate reductions in C stocks;

- substitution of energy-intensive products with products derived from renewable resources; and

- the improvement of practices that aim to increase wood quality for social purposes.

Dr. Luigi Todaro
Dr. Angelo Rita
Dr. Alessio Collalti
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • forest growth
  • carbon allocation
  • woody biomass
  • wood quality

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Aboveground Biomass Response to Release Treatments in a Young Ponderosa Pine Plantation
Forests 2019, 10(9), 795; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10090795 - 12 Sep 2019
Abstract
Controlling competing vegetation is vital for early plantation establishment and growth. Aboveground biomass (AGB) response to manual grubbing release from shrub competition was compared with no release control in a twelve-year-old ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) plantation established after [...] Read more.
Controlling competing vegetation is vital for early plantation establishment and growth. Aboveground biomass (AGB) response to manual grubbing release from shrub competition was compared with no release control in a twelve-year-old ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa Lawson & C. Lawson) plantation established after a wildfire in northeastern California. In addition, response to chemical release followed by precommercial thinning in an adjacent plantation was also examined as a growth potential from a more intensively managed regime, where shrub competition was virtually eliminated. We measured AGB in both planted trees and competing woody shrubs to partition the biomass pools in the plantation. The results showed a significant grubbing treatment effect on basal diameter (BD) at 10 cm aboveground (p = 0.02), but not on tree height (p = 0.055). Height and BD were 2.0 m and 7.4 cm in the manual release, respectively, compared to 1.7 m and 5.6 cm in the control. However, chemical release produced much greater rates of tree growth with a height of 3.6 m and BD of 14.7 cm, respectively. Tree AGB was 60% higher with the manual release of shrubs (1.2 Mg ha−1) than with control (0.7 Mg ha−1) (p < 0.05). The planted area without shrub competition yielded a much higher green tree biomass (16.0 Mg ha−1). When woody shrub biomass was included, the total AGB (trees and woody shrubs) appeared slightly higher, but non-significant in the no release control (13.3 Mg ha−1) than in the manual release (11.9 Mg ha−1) (p = 0.66); the chemical release had 17.1 Mg ha−1. Clearly, shrub biomass dominated this young plantation when understory shrubs were not completely controlled. Although the manual release did increase targeted tree growth to some degree, the cost may limit this practice to a smaller scale and the remaining shrub dominance may create long-term reductions in growth and a persistent fuels problem in these fire-prone ecosystems. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Growth and Tree Water Deficit of Mixed Norway Spruce and European Beech at Different Heights in a Tree and under Heavy Drought
Forests 2019, 10(7), 577; https://doi.org/10.3390/f10070577 - 11 Jul 2019
Abstract
Although several studies suggest that tree species in mixed stands resist drought events better than in pure stands, little is known about the impact on growth and the tree water deficit (TWD) in different tree heights at heavy drought. With dendrometer data at [...] Read more.
Although several studies suggest that tree species in mixed stands resist drought events better than in pure stands, little is known about the impact on growth and the tree water deficit (TWD) in different tree heights at heavy drought. With dendrometer data at the upper and lower stem and coarse roots, we calculated the TWD and growth (ZGmax) (referring to the stem/root basal area) to show (1) the relationship of TWD in different tree heights (50% tree height (H50), breast height (BH), and roots) and the corresponding leaf water potential and (2) how mixture and drought influence the partitioning of growth and tree water. The analyses were made in a mature temperate forest of Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) and European beech (Fagus sylvatica (L.)). Half of the plots were placed under conditions of extreme drought through automatic closing roof systems within the stand. We found a tight relationship of leaf water potentials and TWD at all tree compartments. Through this proven correlation at all tree heights we were also able to study the differences of TWD in all tree compartments next to the growth allocation. Whereas at the beginning of the growing period, trees prioritized growth of the upper stem, during the course of the year the growth of lower stem became a greater priority. Growth allocation of mixed spruces showed a tendency of a higher growth of the roots compared to the BH. However, spruces in interspecific neighborhoods exhibited a lesser TWD in the roots as spruces in intraspecific neighborhood. Beeches in intraspecific neighborhoods showed a higher TWD in BH compared to H50 as beeches in interspecific neighborhoods. Mixture seems to enhance the water supply of spruce trees, which should increase the stability of this species in a time of climatic warming. Full article
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Author: David Kenfack

Title: Dissecting biomass change in different habitat types of a 50-ha plot after 18 years (three censuses)

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