Special Issue "Effects of Disturbance on Forest Dynamics under Climate Changes"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 October 2020.

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Wojciech Grodzki
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Mountain Forests, The Forest Research Institute, ul. A. Fredry 39, 30-605 Kraków, Poland
Interests: dynamics of insect populations; bark beetles; forest protection; nature conservation; forest ecology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Disturbances are an integral part of ecosystem dynamics in forests, influencing their composition, structure, and functional processes. Disturbances can be caused by natural phenomena or factors, both abiotic (fires, wind and snow damage, drought), and biotic (insect and pathogen outbreaks and invasions), but can result from human activities (air pollution and land-use change, fire ignition), that affect forest structure and functions. Not all disturbances are destructive to the overall forest ecosystem – small-scale disturbances can be an important factor contributing in the ecosystem dynamics, driving regeneration – succession processes and/or promoting ecosystem heterogeneity from local to landscape level.

It is obviously known that forest disturbances are sensitive to climates features, that directly contributes in the process or indirectly influences the trees or another factors injurious to them. Our understanding of disturbance dynamics in response to climatic changes seems to be crucial for the forest management towards the adaptation of forest ecosystems to changing conditions. This special issue is focused on the presentation of results and ideas concerning the impact of disturbances stimulated by climate change on forest ecosystems, in terms of ecological processes and resulting forest characteristics. Both the original research and the review papers are welcome.

Prof. Wojciech Grodzki
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Climate change
  • Abiotic factors
  • Biotic agents
  • Effects of disturbances
  • Forest ecology
  • Forest management

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Forest Disturbances in Polish Tatra Mountains for 1985–2016 in Relation to Topography, Stand Features, and Protection Zone
Forests 2020, 11(5), 579; https://doi.org/10.3390/f11050579 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
For more than four centuries, the Tatra Mountains were affected by many factors, such as forest and pastoral management, mining and metallurgy, windthrows, snow avalanches, and bark beetle outbreaks. Due to the availability of the long-running Landsat program enabling acquisition of spatially and [...] Read more.
For more than four centuries, the Tatra Mountains were affected by many factors, such as forest and pastoral management, mining and metallurgy, windthrows, snow avalanches, and bark beetle outbreaks. Due to the availability of the long-running Landsat program enabling acquisition of spatially and spectrally consistent information, it is possible to the use these data for forest disturbance analysis. The main aim of this study was to analyze the relationships between the frequency of disturbances detected over the period of 1985–2016 and selected topographic features, such as elevation, exposure, and slope, derived from a digital elevation model (DEM); stand features, such as vegetation community type, age, structure, and degree of naturalness of the stand; and the management protection zone, which was extracted from thematic layers of the Tatra National Park (TNP). Using the normalized difference moisture index (NDMI), we detected forest disturbances in each year and analyzed them in the context of these topographic features, forest stand characteristics, and the management protection zone. We observed that forest stands in the lower montane zone, slopes between 10°–30°, and eastern exposures were primarily affected by disturbances. These consisted of artificially planted spruce stands aged between 51 and 100 years old. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Effects of Disturbance on Forest Dynamics under Climate Changes)
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