Special Issue "Culture, Plant Health, and Genetics of Christmas Trees in Changing Climate"

A special issue of Forests (ISSN 1999-4907). This special issue belongs to the section "Forest Ecology and Management".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2022 | Viewed by 2323

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Bert Cregg
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Horticulture and Department of Forestry, Michigan State University, 1066 Bogue Street, East Lansing, MI 48824, USA
Interests: tree physiology; Christmas tree production and management
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Inger Sundheim Fløistad
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Norwegian Institute of Bioeconomy Research Postboks 115, NO-1431 Ås, Norway
Interests: seedling quality and establishment for Christmas tree production and forestry
Dr. Chloé Gendre
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Club agroenvironnemental de l'Estrie 4260, boulevard Bourque, Sherbrooke, QC J1N 2A5, Canada
Interests: integrated pest management; Christmas tree production

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Christmas trees are an important tree crop in much of North America and Europe. Production of high-quality trees requires careful management of cultural inputs such as irrigation, fertilization, and pest management, as well as selection of superior genotypes. In addition, the ecological and environmental aspects of Christmas tree production are receiving heightened attention due to the increased impacts of extreme weather events and other climate-related phenomena. Moreover, the post-harvest quality of trees and marketing are critical areas for research and outreach activities. In this Special Issue, we seek contributions on leading research on all areas of Christmas tree culture, genetics, physiology, management, ecology, and marketing. We anticipate most submission will be based on papers presented at the 15th International Christmas Tree Research and Extension Conference, but we welcome other submissions as well.

Dr. Bert Cregg
Dr. Inger Sundheim Fløistad
Dr. Chloé Gendre
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Forests is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Christmas tree production
  • tree improvement and genetics
  • integrated pest management
  • tree physiology
  • marketing
  • post-harvest biology and technology
  • plantation silviculture
  • environmental and ecological interactions

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Article
Linking Changes in Fatty Acid Composition to Postharvest Needle Abscission Resistance in Balsam Fir Trees
Forests 2022, 13(5), 800; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13050800 - 20 May 2022
Viewed by 627
Abstract
Balsam fir needle retention and fatty acid profile changes due to cold acclimation throughout autumn, but little is known about the relationship between these two phenomena. The objective was to examine differences in FAs in contrasting needle abscission resistant balsam fir genotypes throughout [...] Read more.
Balsam fir needle retention and fatty acid profile changes due to cold acclimation throughout autumn, but little is known about the relationship between these two phenomena. The objective was to examine differences in FAs in contrasting needle abscission resistant balsam fir genotypes throughout autumn and early winter. Branches from genotypes with low and high needle abscission resistance (NAR) were collected from September to January and analyzed for FA composition. High NAR genotypes retained needles 120–130% longer than low NAR genotypes and NAR increased through autumn in both genotypes. There was approximately a 3:1 ratio of unsaturated: saturated FAs, which increased by 4% in favor of unsaturated fatty acids through autumn. Palmitic, palmitoleic, and linolenic acid content was significantly higher in high NAR versus low NAR genotypes; arachidic, oleic, linoleic, pinolenic, coniferonic, icosadienoic, and sciadonic acids were lower in high NAR genotypes versus low. Linolenic acid was of particular interest because it tended to decrease throughout autumn, to the point that high NAR genotypes were significantly lower in linolenic acid than low NAR genotypes in January. These changes may be linked to an increase in abscisic acid and/or jasmonic acid synthesis depleting linolenic acid stores and promoting postharvest needle abscission resistance. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Communication
Controlling Leader Growth on Noble and Turkish Fir with S-ABA
Forests 2022, 13(2), 212; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13020212 - 31 Jan 2022
Viewed by 700
Abstract
Control of leader growth in Christmas tree production is a critical and expensive component in developing quality trees. Producers typically hand trim leaders to a desired length. With noble and Turkish fir this practice frequently results in poor top development in the subsequent [...] Read more.
Control of leader growth in Christmas tree production is a critical and expensive component in developing quality trees. Producers typically hand trim leaders to a desired length. With noble and Turkish fir this practice frequently results in poor top development in the subsequent year. This study investigated the use of S-abscisic acid (S-ABA) at various rates up to 6% active ingredient (a.i.) to determine if the plant growth regulator provides predictable leader control with minimal phytotoxicity. S-ABA was effective in controlling leader extension of both noble fir and Turkish fir. Shoot growth of Turkish fir was slightly more sensitive to S-ABA than noble fir, and effective growth control was achieved at 2% a.i., versus 3% a.i. for noble fir. With Turkish fir, we achieved an 80–90% reduction in growth across all sites, depending on rate. For noble fir, we achieved a 67–88% growth reduction. The addition of a surfactant did not increase the effectiveness of S-ABA for growth control and is not recommended. Repeating S-ABA applications 2 weeks after initial application resulted in a slight increase in growth control and phytotoxicity compared to a single application at the same rate. The results suggest that S-ABA can be an effective tool in Christmas tree production to control leader growth on fir species that often produce crooked or multiple leaders in response to conventional leader pruning. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Review
A Review of Chemical Weed Control Practices in Christmas Tree Production in the United States
Forests 2022, 13(2), 250; https://doi.org/10.3390/f13020250 - 06 Feb 2022
Viewed by 502
Abstract
Christmas trees are sensitive to weed competition, especially during establishment. In initial stages of the tree crop, weeds can utilize available soil moisture and trees may succumb to drought stress. In later stages, weeds can even interfere with production practices. Non-chemical weed control [...] Read more.
Christmas trees are sensitive to weed competition, especially during establishment. In initial stages of the tree crop, weeds can utilize available soil moisture and trees may succumb to drought stress. In later stages, weeds can even interfere with production practices. Non-chemical weed control methods alone may not provide effective weed control. Chemical weed management strategies involve the use of preemergence and postemergence herbicides at the right timing and application rates. There are many herbicides that are used in Christmas tree production in the United States, and each has specific application guidelines and weed control spectra. Moreover, crop trees vary in tolerance by species and tree age. Growers need to be careful while applying herbicides as many of these chemicals can cause injury to Christmas trees. Repeated application of herbicides with the same mechanism of action has resulted in development of herbicide resistance among several weed species. Managing herbicide resistance has now become an important issue. More research is required on identifying and managing herbicide resistance among weed species in Christmas tree production. Future research needs to focus on herbicide and mulch combinations, herbicide rotations, and tank mixing different herbicides with different mechanisms of actions and how these affect Christmas tree varieties. Full article
Back to TopTop