Special Issue "Analysis and Health Benefits of Wine Polyphenols"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 August 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Raul Ferrer-Gallego
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Wine Technology Centre (VITEC), Tarragona, Spain
Interests: wine; flavonoids; winemaking; astringency; polyphenols; food analysis; antioxidant activity; sensory evaluation; aromatic composition
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. María José Jara-Palacios
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laboratorio de Color y Calidad de Alimentos. Universidad de Sevilla. Spain
Interests: wine; flavonoids; polyphenols; food analysis; antioxidant activity

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Wine seems to be beneficial to health, and a moderate and regular consumption of this beverage is recommended. The beneficial effect against human diseases is associated with the content of phenolic compounds of wines. Over time, phenolic compounds have received increased attention because of their antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antimicrobial properties, and also have been associated with the prevention of important chronic pathologies, such as cardiovascular disorders, neurodegenerative decline, and even cancer. Therefore, phenolic compounds are considered to be important bioactive compounds; most of these effects have been shown in in vitro, but in vivo studies in the human body are scarce. Nowadays, there is a need to demonstrate the effects of these bioactive compounds applying at least some in vitro biological tests or in vivo assays.

Nowadays, research must go deeper in order to establish more accurate in vivo biomarkers and in order to draw conclusions on the biological effects of dietary wine consumption. Polyphenols are important, not only from a therapeutic point of view, but also in terms of the influence of food components on function and nutrition. The interaction with other food components emerges as an important mechanism involved in these biological effects. Interest in wine polyphenol interactions has increased among food research fields, and also has influence in biological systems in general.

In the last few decades, analysis of the bioactive properties of wine due to its phenolic composition has been of great interest in the wine and food industry, as well as for actual consumers. This Special Issue intends to present and discuss the biological activity of wine polyphenols and their importance in nutrition and health.

The scope of the Special Issue includes the following topics:

  • Antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and antimicrobial activities of wine polyphenols
  • Bioactive effect and wine quality
  • Interaction of wine polyphenols with other food components
  • Wine consumption and beneficial nutrition effects
  • Wine polyphenols and human diseases
  • Assessment of polyphenols addition to improve health effects of wine

Dr. Raul Ferrer-Gallego
Dr. María José Jara-Palacios
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wine
  • phenolic compounds
  • bioactive properties
  • health
  • antioxidant activity

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Polyphenolic Characterization of Grape Skins and Seeds of Four Italian Red Cultivars at Harvest and after Fermentative Maceration
Foods 2019, 8(9), 395; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8090395 - 06 Sep 2019
Abstract
Agro-industry byproducts can still contain large amounts of phenolic compounds, and one of the richest sources are grape skins and seeds as grape pomace, both fermented (red winemaking) and unfermented (white winemaking). The residual polyphenolic content depends on various factors such as grape [...] Read more.
Agro-industry byproducts can still contain large amounts of phenolic compounds, and one of the richest sources are grape skins and seeds as grape pomace, both fermented (red winemaking) and unfermented (white winemaking). The residual polyphenolic content depends on various factors such as grape variety, vintage, and winemaking technique. In this work, four red grape varieties cultivated in northern Italy were studied: Albarossa, Barbera, Nebbiolo, and Uvalino. The work was aimed at studying the polyphenolic composition of skins and seeds from fresh grapes and from the corresponding pomace after fermentative maceration, to assess the actual importance of the varietal differences when processing winemaking byproducts for the extraction of phenolic compounds. The skin and seed extracts were prepared by solvent extraction with a 50% hydroalcoholic solution. The polyphenolic composition of all extracts was determined by spectrophotometry and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); the content and the monomer composition of condensed tannins were determined by phloroglucinolysis; the antioxidant capacity was measured with the ABTS (2,2’-azinobis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6- sulfonate)) method. The antioxidant capacity was higher for the seeds than for the skins, and it was positively correlated with the condensed tannins content. Significant differences in polyphenolic composition of fresh grape skins and seeds were observed between the different cultivars. In particular, Barbera and Albarossa skins were significantly distinguished from Nebbiolo and Uvalino skins for a higher content of anthocyanins and a lower content of vanillin-reactive flavans and condensed tannins; regarding seeds, Barbera and Albarossa had a lower content of vanillin-reactive flavans, proanthocyanidins, and condensed tannins than Nebbiolo and Uvalino. The winemaking process extracted the phenolic compounds to a different extent from skins and seeds, regardless of the cultivar. The differences between cultivars in the polyphenolic profile disappeared after fermentative maceration. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis and Health Benefits of Wine Polyphenols)
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Open AccessArticle
Potential of Cooperage Byproducts Rich in Ellagitannins to Improve the Antioxidant Activity and Color Expression of Red Wine Anthocyanins
Foods 2019, 8(8), 336; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8080336 - 09 Aug 2019
Abstract
Cooperage byproducts are an important source of phenolic compounds that could be used for wine technology applications. The effects of the addition of two types of oak wood shavings (American, AOW, and Ukrainian, UOW) on the antioxidant activity and color of red wine [...] Read more.
Cooperage byproducts are an important source of phenolic compounds that could be used for wine technology applications. The effects of the addition of two types of oak wood shavings (American, AOW, and Ukrainian, UOW) on the antioxidant activity and color of red wine anthocyanins, in a wine model solution, were evaluated by spectrophotometric and colorimetric analyses. Phenolic compounds from shavings, mainly ellagitannins, were determined by ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (UHPLC/MS). Antioxidant and copigmentation effects varied depending on the type of shavings (AOW and UOW) and the phenolic concentration (100, 400, and 500 mg/L). Phenolic compounds from shavings improved the color characteristics (darker and more bluish color) and the copigmentation effect of red wine anthocyanins, being UOW a better source of copigments than AOW shavings. The best antioxidant activity was found for the 400 and 500 mg/L model solutions for both types of shavings. Results show a winemaking technological application based on the repurposing of cooperage byproducts, which could improve color and antioxidant characteristics of red wines. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis and Health Benefits of Wine Polyphenols)
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Open AccessArticle
Antioxidant Characterization and Biological Effects of Grape Pomace Extracts Supplementation in Caenorhabditis elegans
Foods 2019, 8(2), 75; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8020075 - 15 Feb 2019
Abstract
The aim of this work was to evaluate the biological activity of four grape pomace (GP) extracts that are rich in polyphenols using C. elegans as an in vivo model. Different concentrations of the GP extracts were assessed for their effects on the [...] Read more.
The aim of this work was to evaluate the biological activity of four grape pomace (GP) extracts that are rich in polyphenols using C. elegans as an in vivo model. Different concentrations of the GP extracts were assessed for their effects on the resistance of C. elegans against thermally induced oxidative stress, accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), and lifespan. The cultivation of C. elegans with relatively low concentrations of GP extracts increased their resistance against thermal stress and prolonged their lifespan, while high levels displayed detrimental effects. In the studied extracts, maximum protection was observed for levels of polyphenols around 7 to 9 µg gallic acid equivalents per cultivation plate. The obtained results suggested that small changes in the ROS levels could have beneficial effects, although further studies are required to fully understand the impact of the extracts and assayed doses on ROS levels to explain the mechanism that is involved in the observed effects. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Analysis and Health Benefits of Wine Polyphenols)
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