Special Issue "Starch Food: Latest Advances and Prospects"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Grain".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 May 2022.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Ming Miao
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
Interests: starch structure; modification strategy; functional characteristics; digestibility; low glycemic index; biomimetic plant foods; dietary fiber; colonic fermentation; bioactive delivery system
Dr. Long Chen
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
State Key Laboratory of Food Science and Technology, School of Food Science and Technology, Jiangnan University, Wuxi 214122, China
Interests: intelligent food packaging; starch-based biodegradable packaging
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Mario M. Martinez
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, iFOOD Multidisciplinary Center, Aarhus University, Agro Food Park 48, 8200 Aarhus N, Denmark
Interests: extrusion; polymer science; carbohydrate chemistry; starch; plant cell walls; phenolics; food functionality; food packaging
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Starch is an important functional component in many foods and a main source of calories in the human diet. The primary research hotspots in the field of dietary starch include the relationship between structure and  functionality, the precise control or design of tailor-made starch-based food, the development and application of novel processing technologies for the production of innovative healthy foods, the fabrication and characterization of starch-based delivery systems, the exploration and utilization of new starch resources (coarse cereals, banana starch, Yam starch, chestnut starch, leaf starch, etc.), and many other aspects. This Special Issue seeks to provide the latest advances, challenges, and prospects of the biosynthesis, structure–function relationships, and modification and potential applications, of novel starch materials. This Special Issue will cover original research on starch nutritional quality, as well as the analytical methods of starch structure and bio-accesibility, interactions with protein and lipids, and novel processing techniques to manufacture starchy foods for better health.

Thus, the present Special Issue will publish original research papers or review articles with a focus on the novelty of the recent research carried out.

Dr. Ming Miao
Dr. Long Chen
Dr. Mario M. Martinez
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • starch structure
  • starch digestion
  • cereals and grains
  • resistant starch
  • modification approaches
  • food matrix interactions
  • digestibility
  • low glycemic foods
  • whole grain foods
  • dietary fiber
  • nutrient delivery system

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Complexation of 26-Mer Amylose with Egg Yolk Lipids with Different Numbers of Tails Using a Molecular Dynamics Simulation
Foods 2021, 10(10), 2355; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10102355 - 03 Oct 2021
Viewed by 218
Abstract
A molecular dynamics simulation of mixtures of 26-mer amylose with three different egg yolk lipids, namely, cholesterol, triglyceride and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), demonstrated the formation of a stable complex. The 26-mer amylose fluctuated between a coiled and an extended helical conformation. The [...] Read more.
A molecular dynamics simulation of mixtures of 26-mer amylose with three different egg yolk lipids, namely, cholesterol, triglyceride and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC), demonstrated the formation of a stable complex. The 26-mer amylose fluctuated between a coiled and an extended helical conformation. The complex was a V-type amylose complex, with the hydrophobic tail of the lipids being inside the hydrophobic helical cavity of the amylose. The number of glucose units per turn was six for the two helical regions of the amylose-POPC complex and the palmitoyl tail region of the amylose-triglyceride complex. This value was eight for the cholesterol and the two-tail helical region in the amylose-triglyceride complex. Two tails of the POPC were in two different hydrophobic helical regions of the 26-mer amylose, whereas the palmitoyl tail of the triglyceride lay in one hydrophobic helical region and the linoleoyl and oleoyl tails both lay in another helical region, and the cross-sectional area of the latter was larger than the former to accommodate the two tails. The radii of the gyration of the complex were lower for all three cases compared to that of one single amylose. In addition, the stability of the complexes was ranked in the following order: POPC < cholesterol < triglyceride, with their average binding energy being −97.83, −134.09, and −198.35 kJ/mol, respectively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Starch Food: Latest Advances and Prospects)
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Article
Effect of Drying Methods on Properties of Potato Flour and Noodles Made with Potato Flour
Foods 2021, 10(5), 1115; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10051115 - 18 May 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 665
Abstract
This work investigated the impact of three drying methods on structural and functional properties of potato flour (PF), as well as the quality characteristics of fresh noodles made from wheat-potato flours. The results indicated that ethanol drying (ED) and oven drying (OD) had [...] Read more.
This work investigated the impact of three drying methods on structural and functional properties of potato flour (PF), as well as the quality characteristics of fresh noodles made from wheat-potato flours. The results indicated that ethanol drying (ED) and oven drying (OD) had small effects on the properties of starch in potato flour, however, freeze drying (FD) caused some pores and channels on the starch granules and disruption of the long- and short-range ordered structure of starch. The maximum addition of potato flour in fresh noodles was 40% for FD-PF and 50% for both ED-PF and OD-PF. With increasing addition of potato flour in noodles, the L* (lightness) values of noodles decreased gradually, while the a* (redness) and the b* (yellowness) values, as well as the hardness and springiness values of fresh potato noodles increased. This study clearly showed that drying methods have different effects on the properties of potato flour, and in turn the quality of fresh noodles made with potato flour. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Starch Food: Latest Advances and Prospects)
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Review

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Review
Effect of New Frying Technology on Starchy Food Quality
Foods 2021, 10(8), 1852; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10081852 - 11 Aug 2021
Viewed by 727
Abstract
Frying is commonly used by consumers, restaurants, and industries around the globe to cook and process foods. Compared to other food processing methods, frying has several potential advantages, including reduced processing times and the creation of foods with desirable sensory attributes. Frying is [...] Read more.
Frying is commonly used by consumers, restaurants, and industries around the globe to cook and process foods. Compared to other food processing methods, frying has several potential advantages, including reduced processing times and the creation of foods with desirable sensory attributes. Frying is often used to prepare starchy foods. After ingestion, the starch and fat in these foods are hydrolyzed by enzymes in the human digestive tract, thereby providing an important source of energy (glucose and fatty acids) for the human body. Conversely, overconsumption of fried starchy foods can promote overweight, obesity, and other chronic diseases. Moreover, frying can generate toxic reaction products that can damage people’s health. Consequently, there is interest in developing alternative frying technologies that reduce the levels of nutritionally undesirable components in fried foods, such as vacuum, microwave, air, and radiant frying methods. In this review, we focus on the principles and applications of these innovative frying technologies, and highlight their potential advantages and shortcomings. Further development of these technologies should lead to the creation of healthier fried foods that can help combat the rise in diet-related chronic diseases. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Starch Food: Latest Advances and Prospects)
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