Special Issue "Nutritional Value of Grain-Based Foods"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Grain".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 August 2019

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Marina Carcea

Research Centre on Food and Nutrition (CREA-AN), Council for Agricultural Research and Economics (CREA), via Ardeatina, 546, 00178, Rome, Italy
Website | E-Mail
Interests: grains science and technology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Grains are the basis of daily diet worldwide. They are the seeds of plants, belonging mainly to the botanical groups of cereals, pseudo cereals and legumes.

They contribute macro nutrients to the human diet, mainly carbohydrates, but also proteins and lipids and micro nutrients, such as vitamins and minerals, but they also are an important source of dietary fiber and bioactives, particularly wholegrains, which are interesting for the production of high-value food products with enhanced health benefits. The content of the aforesaid components vary in grains, depending on genetics and growing conditions, including environment and husbandry.

Humans cannot consume them in the raw state, as such grains undergo a number of processing steps that might include dehulling, milling, dough making, extrusion, bread making, couscous making, and pasta making, up to home cooking. Moreover, different kinds of grains can be combined in the same product to take advantage, in some cases, of the complementarity of composition, thus giving origin to a product with an improved nutritional value (see the combination of cereals and legumes).

The aim of this Special Issue is to collect studies on the latest developments in grain science with regards, in particular, to the improvement of the nutritional value of raw materials due to breeding and/or growing conditions, and the role of processing in keeping or enhancing grain nutritional potentials for the development of healthy and attractive improved traditional or new products for human consumption.

Dr. Marina Carcea
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 650 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • cereals
  • legumes
  • pseudo cereals
  • nutrients
  • bioactives
  • processing

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle A Survey of Sodium Chloride Content in Italian Artisanal and Industrial Bread
Foods 2018, 7(11), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7110181
Received: 19 October 2018 / Revised: 30 October 2018 / Accepted: 2 November 2018 / Published: 5 November 2018
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Abstract
A nationwide survey on salt content in both artisanal and industrial bread was undertaken in Italy to establish a baseline for salt reduction initiatives. Excess sodium intake in the diet is associated with high blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Bread [...] Read more.
A nationwide survey on salt content in both artisanal and industrial bread was undertaken in Italy to establish a baseline for salt reduction initiatives. Excess sodium intake in the diet is associated with high blood pressure and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. Bread has been identified as a major contributor to salt intake in the Italian diet. Most of the bread consumed in Italy comes from artisanal bakeries so 135 artisanal bread were sampled in 56 locations from Northern to Southern Italy together with 19 samples of industrial bread representative of the entire Italian production. Sodium chloride content was analysed according to the Volhardt’s method. A salt content between 0.7% and 2.3% g/100 g (as is basis) was found, with a mean value of 1.5% (Standard Deviation, 0.3). However, the majority of samples (58%) had a content below 1.5%, with 12% having a very low salt content (between 0.5% and 1.0%), whereas the remaining 42% had a salt content higher than the mean value with a very high salt content (>2.0%) recorded for 3% of samples. As regards the industrial bread, an average content of 1.6% was found (SD, 0.3). In this group, most of the samples (56%) had a very high content between 2.0% and 2.5%, whereas 5% only had a content between 1.1% and 1.5%. Statistics on salt content are also reported for the different categories of bread. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Value of Grain-Based Foods)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Fat Replacers in Baked Food Products
Foods 2018, 7(12), 192; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods7120192
Received: 15 October 2018 / Revised: 22 November 2018 / Accepted: 22 November 2018 / Published: 25 November 2018
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Abstract
Fat provides important sensory properties to baked food products, such as colour, taste, texture and odour, all of which contribute to overall consumer acceptance. Baked food products, such as crackers, cakes and biscuits, typically contain high amounts of fat. However, there is increasing [...] Read more.
Fat provides important sensory properties to baked food products, such as colour, taste, texture and odour, all of which contribute to overall consumer acceptance. Baked food products, such as crackers, cakes and biscuits, typically contain high amounts of fat. However, there is increasing demand for healthy snack foods with reduced fat content. In order to maintain consumer acceptance whilst simultaneously reducing the total fat content, fat replacers have been employed. There are a number of fat replacers that have been investigated in baked food products, ranging from complex carbohydrates, gums and gels, whole food matrices, and combinations thereof. Fat replacers each have different properties that affect the quality of a food product. In this review, we summarise the literature on the effect of fat replacers on the quality of baked food products. The ideal fat replacers for different types of low-fat baked products were a combination of polydextrose and guar gum in biscuits at 70% fat replacement (FR), oleogels in cake at 100% FR, and inulin in crackers at 75% FR. The use of oatrim (100% FR), bean puree (75% FR) or green pea puree (75% FR) as fat replacers in biscuits were equally successful. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Value of Grain-Based Foods)
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