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Open AccessArticle

Micronutrient Analysis of Gluten-Free Products: Their Low Content Is Not Involved in Gluten-Free Diet Imbalance in a Cohort of Celiac Children and Adolescent

1
Gluten Analysis Laboratory of the University of the Basque Country, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, 01006 Vitoria, Spain
2
GLUTEN3S research group, Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of the Basque Country, UPV/EHU, 01006 Vitoria, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Foods 2019, 8(8), 321; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8080321
Received: 19 July 2019 / Revised: 1 August 2019 / Accepted: 5 August 2019 / Published: 7 August 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Nutritional Value of Grain-Based Foods)
Data about the nutritional composition of gluten-free products (GFP) are still limited. Most studies are based on ingredient and nutrition information described on the food label. However, analytical determination is considered the gold standard for compositional analysis of food. Micronutrient analytical content differences were observed in a selection of GF breads, flakes and pasta, when compared with their respective gluten-containing counterparts. In general terms, lower iron, piridoxin, riboflavin, thiamin, niacin, folate, manganese and vitamin B5 can be underlined. Variations in biotin and vitamin E content differed among groups. In order to clarify the potential contribution of the GFP to the gluten-free diet’s (GFD) micronutrient shortages, analytical data were used to evaluate GFD in a cohort of celiac children and adolescent. Participants did not reach recommendations for vitamin A, vitamin E, folic acid, vitamin D, biotin, iodine, and copper. It does not seem that the lower micronutrient content of the analyzed GFP groups contributed to the micronutrient deficits detected in GFD in this cohort, whose diet was not balanced. Nevertheless, GFP fortification for folate and biotin is proposed to prevent the deficiencies observed in GFD, at least in the case of pediatric celiac disease. View Full-Text
Keywords: celiac disease; gluten-free diet; gluten-free product; micronutrient; vitamin and minerals; dietary recommendation celiac disease; gluten-free diet; gluten-free product; micronutrient; vitamin and minerals; dietary recommendation
MDPI and ACS Style

Larretxi, I.; Txurruka, I.; Navarro, V.; Lasa, A.; Bustamante, M.Á.; Fernández-Gil, M.P.; Simón, E.; Miranda, J. Micronutrient Analysis of Gluten-Free Products: Their Low Content Is Not Involved in Gluten-Free Diet Imbalance in a Cohort of Celiac Children and Adolescent. Foods 2019, 8, 321.

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