Special Issue "Food Identity, Authenticity and Fraud: The Full Spectrum"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (28 February 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Saskia Van Ruth
Website
Guest Editor
Food Quality and Design Group, Wageningen University and Research, P.O. Box 8129, 6700 EV Wageningen, The Netherlands
Interests: food identity; food authenticity and fraud; analytical chemistry
Prof. Dr. Daniel Granato
grade Website
Guest Editor
Natural Resources Institute Finland (Luke), Helsinki, Finland
Interests: reactive oxygen species; inflammation; antioxidants; multivariate data analysis; phenolic compounds; statistical optimization; food chemistry; analytical methods; phenolic compounds; food fraud
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Issues with food authenticity, surfacing frequently, have led to an increased awareness and interest in the field of food authenticity and fraud. There is a need to understand factors that contribute to the occurrence of food fraud, as well as novel detection technologies and the associated statistical techniques used to detect adulteration in food products. We are currently inviting papers on studies on various aspects of food identity, food authenticity and food fraud for this Special Issue of Foods. This includes the full multidisciplinary spectrum of analytical chemistry, physics, statistics, food quality management, criminology, marketing, consumer sciences, and economic sciences.

Prof. Saskia van Ruth
Prof. Daniel Granato
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Food authenticity
  • Food fraud
  • Criminology
  • Consumer science
  • Analytical chemistry

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Editorial

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Open AccessEditorial
Food Identity, Authenticity and Fraud: The Full Spectrum
Foods 2017, 6(7), 49; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6070049 - 06 Jul 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
We are pleased to introduce this Special Issue of Foods dedicated to ‘Food Identity, Authenticity and Fraud: The Full Spectrum’.[...] Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Identity, Authenticity and Fraud: The Full Spectrum)

Research

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Open AccessArticle
Characterization of Retail Conventional, Organic, and Grass Full-Fat Butters by Their Fat Contents, Free Fatty Acid Contents, and Triglyceride and Fatty Acid Profiling
Foods 2017, 6(4), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6040026 - 31 Mar 2017
Cited by 4
Abstract
In the Netherlands, butter is produced from milk originating from three different production systems: conventional, organic, and grass-fed cows. The aim of the current study was to characterize these types of butters, and pinpoint distinct compositional differences. Retail conventional (n = 28), [...] Read more.
In the Netherlands, butter is produced from milk originating from three different production systems: conventional, organic, and grass-fed cows. The aim of the current study was to characterize these types of butters, and pinpoint distinct compositional differences. Retail conventional (n = 28), organic (n = 14), and grass (n = 12) full-fat butters were collected during the winter and summer seasons. Samples were analyzed for their fat content, free fatty acid (FFA) content, and triglyceride (TG) and fatty acid (FA) profiles. The fat content was significantly lower in conventional butters than in organic butters and the FFA content was significantly lower in conventional butters compared with grass butters. Also, organic butters differed significantly from their conventional counterparts with regard to their TG and FA profiles. The TG profiles of the organic and grass butters did not differ significantly. The FA profiles of grass butters were less distinct, since only a few FAs differed significantly from conventional (six FAs) and organic (eight FAs) butters. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Identity, Authenticity and Fraud: The Full Spectrum)
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Open AccessArticle
Identification of the Geographic Origin of Parmigiano Reggiano (P.D.O.) Cheeses Deploying Non-Targeted Mass Spectrometry and Chemometrics
Foods 2017, 6(2), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods6020013 - 16 Feb 2017
Cited by 10
Abstract
Parmigiano Reggiano is an Italian product with a protected designation of origin (P.D.O.). It is an aged hard cheese made from raw milk. P.D.O. products are protected by European regulations. Approximately 3 million wheels are produced each year, and the product attracts a [...] Read more.
Parmigiano Reggiano is an Italian product with a protected designation of origin (P.D.O.). It is an aged hard cheese made from raw milk. P.D.O. products are protected by European regulations. Approximately 3 million wheels are produced each year, and the product attracts a relevant premium price due to its quality and all around the world well known typicity. Due to the high demand that exceeds the production, several fraudulent products can be found on the market. The rate of fraud is estimated between 20% and 40%, the latter predominantly in the grated form. We have developed a non-target method based on Liquid Chomatography-High Resolution Mass Spectrometry (LC-HRMS) that allows the discrimination of Parmigiano Reggiano from non-authentic products with milk from different geographical origins or products, where other aspects of the production process do not comply with the rules laid down in the production specifications for Parmeggiano Reggiano. Based on a database created with authentic samples provided by the Consortium of Parmigiano Reggiano Cheese, a reliable classification model was built. The overall classification capabilities of this non-targeted method was verified on 32 grated cheese samples. The classification was 87.5% accurate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Identity, Authenticity and Fraud: The Full Spectrum)
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Open AccessArticle
A Rapid Colorimetric Method Reveals Fraudulent Substitutions in Sea Urchin Roe Marketed in Sardinia (Italy)
Foods 2016, 5(3), 47; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5030047 - 25 Jun 2016
Cited by 1
Abstract
In recent years, besides the consumption of fresh sea urchin specimens, the demand of minimally-processed roe has grown considerably. This product has made frequent consumption in restaurants possible and frauds are becoming widespread with the partial replacement of sea urchin roe with surrogates [...] Read more.
In recent years, besides the consumption of fresh sea urchin specimens, the demand of minimally-processed roe has grown considerably. This product has made frequent consumption in restaurants possible and frauds are becoming widespread with the partial replacement of sea urchin roe with surrogates that are similar in colour. One of the main factors that determines the quality of the roe is its colour and small differences in colour scale cannot be easily discerned by the consumers. In this study we have applied a rapid colorimetric method for reveal the fraudulent partial substitution of semi-solid sea urchin roe with liquid egg yolk. Objective assessment of whiteness (L*), redness (a*), yellowness (b*), hue (h*), and chroma (C*) was carried out with a digital spectrophotometer using the CIE L*a*b* colour measurement system. The colorimetric method highlighted statistically significant differences among sea urchin roe and liquid egg yolk that could be easily discerned quantitatively. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Identity, Authenticity and Fraud: The Full Spectrum)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Chemometrics Methods for Specificity, Authenticity and Traceability Analysis of Olive Oils: Principles, Classifications and Applications
Foods 2016, 5(4), 77; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods5040077 - 17 Nov 2016
Cited by 9
Abstract
Background. Olive oils (OOs) show high chemical variability due to several factors of genetic, environmental and anthropic types. Genetic and environmental factors are responsible for natural compositions and polymorphic diversification resulting in different varietal patterns and phenotypes. Anthropic factors, however, are at the [...] Read more.
Background. Olive oils (OOs) show high chemical variability due to several factors of genetic, environmental and anthropic types. Genetic and environmental factors are responsible for natural compositions and polymorphic diversification resulting in different varietal patterns and phenotypes. Anthropic factors, however, are at the origin of different blends’ preparation leading to normative, labelled or adulterated commercial products. Control of complex OO samples requires their (i) characterization by specific markers; (ii) authentication by fingerprint patterns; and (iii) monitoring by traceability analysis. Methods. These quality control and management aims require the use of several multivariate statistical tools: specificity highlighting requires ordination methods; authentication checking calls for classification and pattern recognition methods; traceability analysis implies the use of network-based approaches able to separate or extract mixed information and memorized signals from complex matrices. Results. This chapter presents a review of different chemometrics methods applied for the control of OO variability from metabolic and physical-chemical measured characteristics. The different chemometrics methods are illustrated by different study cases on monovarietal and blended OO originated from different countries. Conclusion. Chemometrics tools offer multiple ways for quantitative evaluations and qualitative control of complex chemical variability of OO in relation to several intrinsic and extrinsic factors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Food Identity, Authenticity and Fraud: The Full Spectrum)
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