Special Issue "Bioactive Compounds: Applications in Foods of Animal Origin"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 December 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Panagiotis Simitzis
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Guest Editor
Department of Animal Science, Agricultural University of Athens, Athens, Greece
Interests: milk quality; dietary antioxidants; animal welfare
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Ilias Giannenas
Website
Guest Editor
Laboratory of Nutrition, School of Veterinary Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Thessaloniki 54124, Greece
Interests: Antioxidants; Dietary Supplements; poultry nutrition

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Foods of animal origin occupy quite an exceptional position in the preferences of the consumers and the interest of industry, since they provide human organism with high-quality proteins, vitamins, and minerals. At the same time, a constant challenge is faced by the health sector around the world to uncover the factors associated with the etiology of several diseases. Much attention has therefore been paid to develop animal products with physiological functions that promote human health. Because of the increased consumer awareness and concern regarding the use of synthetic additives, extensive research has been carried out to identify safe and efficient alternatives. The fortification of animal products with natural bioactive compounds appears to improve their quality characteristics and protect consumers against oxidation and bacterial spoilage effects. This Special Issue welcomes original research papers and review articles on the effects of natural bioactive compounds on animal products.

Assist. Prof. Panagiotis Simitzis
Assist. Prof. Ilias Giannenas
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • antioxidants
  • essential oils
  • phytochemicals
  • food processing
  • dietary additives
  • quality of animal products
  • microbial spoilage
  • oxidation

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Different Tetracycline Antimicrobial Therapy of Mycoplasma (Mycoplasma synoviae) in Laying Hens Compared to Tea Tree Essential Oil on Table Egg Quality and Antibiotic Residues
Foods 2020, 9(5), 612; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050612 - 11 May 2020
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 1133
Abstract
The food of animal origin that is the most consumed is the table egg, but laying hens treated with antibiotics can produce eggs contaminated with antibiotic residues. Residues of antibiotics may present a risk for consumer health. Keeping in mind that laying hens [...] Read more.
The food of animal origin that is the most consumed is the table egg, but laying hens treated with antibiotics can produce eggs contaminated with antibiotic residues. Residues of antibiotics may present a risk for consumer health. Keeping in mind that laying hens almost always suffer from Mycoplasma (Mycoplasma synoviae), for which they are treated with antibiotics, high-quality egg production is even harder. Our research aimed to investigate the influence of three different antibiotics compared to the tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia) essential oil administered to naturally infected laying hens with M. synoviae, on antibiotic residues in eggs as well as the egg nutritive and sensory qualities. A total of 20,000 laying hens, housed in one facility and divided into four lines each consisting of 5000 hens naturally infected with M. synoviae, was used. For the antimicrobial therapy, tetracycline (TC), oxytetracycline (OTC) and chlortetracycline (CTC) were used, respectively. As a control, tea tree essential oil (TT) was used. Based on the gained results all tetracyclines treatment residue values were significantly (p < 0.05) higher compared to the control treatment (TT), but without any significant differences (p > 0.05) between themselves. The results showed no differences in the nutritive and the sensory qualities of eggs between the control and the experimental treatments (p > 0.05). Keeping in mind the obtained results from this study, it can be concluded that tea tree essential oil could be successfully used as a natural antibiotic in the treatment of M. synoviae, without any adverse effects on table egg quality. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds: Applications in Foods of Animal Origin)
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Open AccessArticle
The Effect of Whey on Performance, Gut Health and Bone Morphology Parameters in Broiler Chicks
Foods 2020, 9(5), 588; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050588 - 05 May 2020
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 863
Abstract
Whey is a highly nutritious byproduct of the cheese industry that can be used effectively in the animal feed industry. However, the use of whey in poultry diets is limited by its high lactose and mineral contents. The objective of the present study [...] Read more.
Whey is a highly nutritious byproduct of the cheese industry that can be used effectively in the animal feed industry. However, the use of whey in poultry diets is limited by its high lactose and mineral contents. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the effect of different concentrations of whey in poultry diets on the performance, intestinal microbiota and physico-chemical parameters of the intestinal ecosystem, as well as on the bone morphology and its strength in broiler chicks. One hundred and twenty-eight, day-old, male broiler chicks were randomly allocated into four treatment groups of 32 chicks each. The treatment groups were: group A, which served as negative control and groups B, C and D, supplemented with 1, 2 and 5% of dietary whey, respectively. Performance of the groups was evaluated throughout the experiment. Following necropsies, the gastrointestinal tract from each bird was removed, divided into its anatomical parts and intestinal samples were taken for microbiological analysis and for pH and viscosity measurement as well. Tibiotarsus was also collected for morphometric analysis and strength evaluation. The statistical analysis of the experimental data revealed that the dietary supplementation of 1 and 2% of whey improved significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the body weight, while the addition of 5% of whey reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the body weight. Furthermore, the addition of 1, 2 and 5% of dietary whey increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the pH of jejunum digesta and reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the pH of caecum digesta compared to the control group. The addition of 1 and 2% of whey reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the viscosity in the jejunum and ileum digesta, compared to the addition of 5% of whey which reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the viscosity in jejunum digesta but increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the viscosity in ileum digesta. Moreover, the addition of 1, 2 and 5% of dietary whey increased significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the caecal counts of Lactobacillus spp. and Lactococcus lactis, while the addition of 5% of whey reduced significantly (p ≤ 0.05) the tibiotarsus length. It can be concluded that the addition of low quantities of whey up to 2% promoted the performance and gut health of birds, while the addition of higher quantities of whey at the level of 5% had a detrimental effect on the performance and tibiotarsus length. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds: Applications in Foods of Animal Origin)
Open AccessCommunication
Effects of Dried Olive Pulp Dietary Supplementation on Quality Characteristics and Antioxidant Capacity of Pig Meat
Foods 2020, 9(1), 81; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010081 - 11 Jan 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 977
Abstract
Olive pulp belongs to agro-industrial by-products, and its addition into livestock diets generally result in neutral or positive effects on performance. However, the data concerning the effects of olive by-products on pork meat characteristics are scarce. The aim of this preliminary study was [...] Read more.
Olive pulp belongs to agro-industrial by-products, and its addition into livestock diets generally result in neutral or positive effects on performance. However, the data concerning the effects of olive by-products on pork meat characteristics are scarce. The aim of this preliminary study was therefore to examine the effects of dried olive pulp (DOP) dietary supplementation on quality parameters and oxidative stability of pig meat. Twenty finishing pigs were allocated to two groups: C that was provided with a control diet, and DOP that was fed with an isonitrogenous and isoenergetic diet supplemented with dried olive pulp at the level of 50 g/kg or 5%. As indicated, cold carcass weight, pH, lightness, redness, cooking loss, and tenderness were not influenced by DOP inclusion. Only meat yellowness (a*) was significantly decreased in DOP meat samples. Moreover, meat oxidation values tended to decrease in the DOP group after one day, but no further differences were observed after four, six, and eight days of refrigerated storage. It can be concluded that DOP dietary supplementation could be recommended as a feasible approach, especially in the Mediterranean region to reduce diet formulation costs, while no significant side effects on pork meat quality are observed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds: Applications in Foods of Animal Origin)

Review

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Open AccessReview
Natural Phenolic Compounds for the Control of Oxidation, Bacterial Spoilage, and Foodborne Pathogens in Meat
Foods 2020, 9(6), 794; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060794 - 16 Jun 2020
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 918
Abstract
Alternative technologies for long-term preservation, quality assurance, and safety of meat are continuously pursued by the food industry to satisfy the demands of modern consumers for nutritious and healthy meat-based products. Naturally occurring phenolic compounds are considered promising substances by the meat industry [...] Read more.
Alternative technologies for long-term preservation, quality assurance, and safety of meat are continuously pursued by the food industry to satisfy the demands of modern consumers for nutritious and healthy meat-based products. Naturally occurring phenolic compounds are considered promising substances by the meat industry for their antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, while consumers seem to embrace them for their claimed health benefits. Despite the numerous in vitro and in situ studies demonstrating their beneficial effects against meat oxidation, spoilage, and foodborne pathogens, wide application and commercialization has not been yet achieved. Major obstacles are still the scarcity of legislative framework, the large variety of meat-based products and targeted pathogens, the limited number of case-specific application protocols and the questionable universal efficiency of the applied ones. The objectives of the present review are (i) to summarize the current knowledge about the applications of naturally occurring phenols in meat and meat-based products, emphasizing the mechanisms, determinants, and spectrum of their antioxidant and antimicrobial activity; (ii) to present state-of-the-art technologies utilized for the application of phenolic compounds in meat systems; and (iii) to discuss relevant regulation, limitations, perspectives, and future challenges for their mass industrial use. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds: Applications in Foods of Animal Origin)
Open AccessReview
Bioactive Compounds in Food Waste: A Review on the Transformation of Food Waste to Animal Feed
Foods 2020, 9(3), 291; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030291 - 05 Mar 2020
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 1863
Abstract
Bioactive compounds are substances which are present in foods in small amounts and have the ability to provide health benefits. Bioactive compounds include but are not limited to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, carotenoids, peptides, and polyphenols. The aim of the present study [...] Read more.
Bioactive compounds are substances which are present in foods in small amounts and have the ability to provide health benefits. Bioactive compounds include but are not limited to long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, carotenoids, peptides, and polyphenols. The aim of the present study is to review literature for potential bioactive compounds present in food waste material and discuss the transformation of food waste to animal feed under the perspective that usage of food waste, rather than disposal, may tackle food insecurity and provide health benefits. Finally, applications in poultry and swine nutrition, with emphasis on the presence of fatty acids on food waste material, are discussed. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioactive Compounds: Applications in Foods of Animal Origin)
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