Special Issue "Novel Foods and Nutritional Function"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Nutrition".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Francisco Javier Señoráns
SciProfiles
Guest Editor
Faculty of Sciences, Autonomous University of Madrid (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid), Spain
Interests: new bioactive ingredients extraction; functional food production; healthy lipid modification and design; microencapsulation; microalgae and biomass green biorefineries; novel foods

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

In recent years, the rate of appearance of novel foods has rapidly increased in most countries, delivering new sources of nutrients and bioactive compounds. The main groups of novel foods include sources of healthy lipids, such as oils from chia, coriander, camelina, Echium, Buglossoides, etc., and other special oils from krill; squids; algae; Mortierella; and, more recently, Calanus. In the field of carbohydrates, approved novel foods include sugar substitutes and sweeteners like trehalose, D-tagatose, lactitol, and isomaltulose with different uses. Other remarkable novel foods include fibre and high-quality proteins from lupins, quinoa, sugar cane, hempseed, whey, etc., with clear nutritional roles as alternative sources.

Novel foods may also have health benefits beyond usual nutritional functions that are under research. In this sense, key areas for novel food benefits are the modulation of immune responses, the prevention of age-related cognitive decline, cardiovascular disease prevention, and aiding brain function, with important bioactivities of novel ingredients as lycopene and astaxanthin carotenoids, trans-resveratrol, hydroxytyrosol, phospholipids, and beta-glucans, all of them with known biological activities that will contribute to potential health claims in the short term.

Furthermore, completely new sources of ingredients like some mushrooms and especially, microalgae (like Schizochytrium and Tetraselmis chuii and other under evaluation), together with many new food applications that could be accepted in the near future, are being investigated for having a host of interesting components and nutrients.

Prof. Francisco Javier Señoráns
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Novel foods
  • Nutrients
  • Sources of healthy lipids
  • High-quality proteins
  • Sugar substitutes
  • Bioactive compounds
  • Microalgae
  • Health benefits

Published Papers (13 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Jump to: Review

Open AccessCommunication
Is There Scope for a Novel Mycelium Category of Proteins alongside Animals and Plants?
Foods 2020, 9(9), 1151; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9091151 - 21 Aug 2020
Abstract
In the 21st century, we face a troubling trilemma of expanding populations, planetary and public wellbeing. Given this, shifts from animal to plant food protein are gaining momentum and are an important part of reducing carbon emissions and consumptive water use. However, as [...] Read more.
In the 21st century, we face a troubling trilemma of expanding populations, planetary and public wellbeing. Given this, shifts from animal to plant food protein are gaining momentum and are an important part of reducing carbon emissions and consumptive water use. However, as this fast-pace of change sets in and begins to firmly embed itself within food-based dietary guidelines (FBDG) and food policies we must raise an important question—is now an opportunistic time to include other novel, nutritious and sustainable proteins within FBGD? The current paper describes how food proteins are typically categorised within FBDG and discusses how these could further evolve. Presently, food proteins tend to fall under the umbrella of being ‘animal-derived’ or ‘plant-based’ whilst other valuable proteins i.e., fungal-derived appear to be comparatively overlooked. A PubMed search of systematic reviews and meta-analytical studies published over the last 5 years shows an established body of evidence for animal-derived proteins (although some findings were less favourable), plant-based proteins and an expanding body of science for mycelium/fungal-derived proteins. Given this, along with elevated demands for alternative proteins there appears to be scope to introduce a ‘third’ protein category when compiling FBDG. This could fall under the potential heading of ‘fungal’ protein, with scope to include mycelium such as mycoprotein within this, for which the evidence-base is accruing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Health Promoting Bioactive Properties of Novel Hairless Canary Seed Flour after In Vitro Gastrointestinal Digestion
Foods 2020, 9(7), 932; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9070932 - 14 Jul 2020
Abstract
The bioactive properties and health-promoting effects of two novel yellow (C09052, C05041) and two brown (Calvi, Bastia) hairless canary seed (Phalaris canariensis L.) cultivars were investigated in comparison to two common cereal grains (wheat and oat). The cereal flours were digested using [...] Read more.
The bioactive properties and health-promoting effects of two novel yellow (C09052, C05041) and two brown (Calvi, Bastia) hairless canary seed (Phalaris canariensis L.) cultivars were investigated in comparison to two common cereal grains (wheat and oat). The cereal flours were digested using the standardized INFOGEST in vitro human gastrointestinal digestion model. The three-kilo dalton molecular weight cutoff (3 kDa MWCO) permeate of the generated digestates was assessed in vitro for their antioxidant, chelating, antihypertensive and antidiabetic activities. The results showed no significant differences in studied bioactivities between yellow and brown canary seed cultivars, except for antioxidant activity by the DPPH and chelating Fe2+ assays, where brown cultivars had higher activities. Canary seeds had superior or equivalent antioxidant activity than those from oat and wheat. The anti-hypertensive activity (Angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition) in yellow canary seed cultivars was significantly higher than that of oat and wheat, particularly for C09052 and Calvi varieties. Peptides exhibiting the highest antihypertensive activity from the permeate of the C09052 canary seed variety were further fractionated and identified by mass spectrometry. Forty-six peptides were identified belonging to 18 proteins from the Pooideae subfamily. Fourteen of the parent proteins were homologous to barley proteins. Peptides were analyzed in silico to determine potential bioactivity based on their amino acid composition. All 46 peptides had potential anti-hypertensive and anti-diabetic activities and 20 had potential antioxidant activity, thereby validating the in vitro assay data. Canary seed peptides also exhibited potential antiamnestic, antithrombotic, immunostimulating, opioid and neuro-activity, demonstrating important potential for health promoting effects, particularly against cardiovascular disease. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Optimization of the Red Tilapia (Oreochromis spp.) Viscera Hydrolysis for Obtaining Iron-Binding Peptides and Evaluation of In Vitro Iron Bioavailability
Foods 2020, 9(7), 883; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9070883 - 06 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Iron deficiencies continue to cause significant health problems in vulnerable populations. A good strategy to combat mineral deficiency includes fortification with iron-binding peptides. This research aims to determine the optimal conditions to hydrolyze red tilapia viscera (RTV) using Alcalase 2.4 L and recovery [...] Read more.
Iron deficiencies continue to cause significant health problems in vulnerable populations. A good strategy to combat mineral deficiency includes fortification with iron-binding peptides. This research aims to determine the optimal conditions to hydrolyze red tilapia viscera (RTV) using Alcalase 2.4 L and recovery of iron-binding protein hydrolysate. The result showed that under the optimal hydrolysis condition including pH 10, 60 °C, E/S ratio of 0.306 U/g protein, and substrate concentration of 8 g protein/L, the obtained hydrolysate with 42.5% degree of hydrolysis (RTVH-B), displayed the maximal iron-binding capacity of 67.1 ± 1.9%. Peptide fractionation was performed using ultrafiltration and the <1 kDa fraction (FRTVH-V) expressed the highest iron-binding capacity of 95.8 ± 1.5%. Iron content of RTVH-B and its fraction was assessed, whereas iron uptake was measured indirectly as ferritin synthesis in a Caco-2 cell model and the result showed that bioavailability of bound minerals from protein complexes was significantly higher (p < 0.05) than iron salt in its free form, increased 4.7 times for the Fe2+–RTVH-B complex. This research suggests a potential application of RTVH-B as dietary supplements to improve iron absorption. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Integrated Profiling of Fatty Acids, Sterols and Phenolic Compounds in Tree and Herbaceous Peony Seed Oils: Marker Screening for New Resources of Vegetable Oil
Foods 2020, 9(6), 770; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9060770 - 11 Jun 2020
Abstract
Tree peonies (Paeonia ostii and Paeonia rockii) are popular ornamental plants. Moreover, these plants have become oil crops in recent years. However, there are limited compositional studies focused on fatty acids. Therefore, this work aims to reveal compositional characteristics, regarding fatty [...] Read more.
Tree peonies (Paeonia ostii and Paeonia rockii) are popular ornamental plants. Moreover, these plants have become oil crops in recent years. However, there are limited compositional studies focused on fatty acids. Therefore, this work aims to reveal compositional characteristics, regarding fatty acids, sterols, γ-tocopherol and phenolic compounds, of tree peony seed oils from all major cultivation areas in China, and to compare with herbaceous peony seed oil. For that, an integrative analysis was performed by GC-FID, GC-MS and UHPLC-Q-TOF-MS technologies. The main fatty acid was α-linolenic acid (39.0–48.3%), while β-sitosterol (1802.5–2793.7 mg/kg) and fucosterol (682.2–1225.1 mg/kg) were the dominant phytosterols. Importantly, 34 phenolic compounds, including paeonol and “Paeonia glycosides” (36.62–103.17 μg/g), were characterized in vegetable oils for the first time. Conclusively, this work gives new insights into the phytochemical composition of peony seed oil and reveals the presence of bioactive compounds, including “Paeonia glycosides”. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Mesopelagic Species and Their Potential Contribution to Food and Feed Security—A Case Study from Norway
Foods 2020, 9(3), 344; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030344 - 16 Mar 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The projected increase in global population will demand a major increase in global food production. There is a need for more biomass from the ocean as future food and feed, preferentially from lower trophic levels. In this study, we estimated the mesopelagic biomass [...] Read more.
The projected increase in global population will demand a major increase in global food production. There is a need for more biomass from the ocean as future food and feed, preferentially from lower trophic levels. In this study, we estimated the mesopelagic biomass in three Norwegian fjords. We analyzed the nutrient composition in six of the most abundant mesopelagic species and evaluated their potential contribution to food and feed security. The six species make up a large part of the mesopelagic biomass in deep Norwegian fjords. Several of the analyzed mesopelagic species, especially the fish species Benthosema glaciale and Maurolicus muelleri, were nutrient dense, containing a high level of vitamin A1, calcium, selenium, iodine, eicopentaenoic acid (EPA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) and cetoleic acid. We were able to show that mesopelagic species, whose genus or family are found to be widespread and numerous around the globe, are nutrient dense sources of micronutrients and marine-based ingredients and may contribute significantly to global food and feed security. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Water Cooking Stability of Dried Noodles Enriched with Different Particle Size and Concentration Green Tea Powders
Foods 2020, 9(3), 298; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9030298 - 05 Mar 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Incorporating green tea powder (GTP) into dried noodles enriched the functional characteristics of noodles. To achieve the maximum benefits from GTP, the water cooking stability of dried green tea noodles (DGTN) should be investigated. Indeed, antioxidant activities and phenolic compounds of DGTN after [...] Read more.
Incorporating green tea powder (GTP) into dried noodles enriched the functional characteristics of noodles. To achieve the maximum benefits from GTP, the water cooking stability of dried green tea noodles (DGTN) should be investigated. Indeed, antioxidant activities and phenolic compounds of DGTN after water cooking markedly decreased. The results showed that large GTP particles caused the increased cooking loss of DGTN, but the phenolic compound loss of DGTN prepared with them was low after cooking. Analysis of texture properties and microstructure showed that DGTN with a 2% concentration of large GTP particles formed some holes in the noodles’ network, and its breaking strength decreased. However, we observed that many GTP particles adhered to the surface of DGTN prepared with small GTP particles, and they were easier to lose after water cooking. Comprehensive analysis concluded that cooking loss, functional compounds retention and textural properties of DGTN were related to GTP particle size and concentration via the microstructure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Sensory and Chemical Drivers of Wine Consumers’ Preference for a New Shiraz Wine Product Containing Ganoderma lucidum Extract as a Novel Ingredient
Foods 2020, 9(2), 224; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9020224 - 20 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
This study explored wine consumers’ preferences towards a novel Australian Shiraz wine product containing Ganoderma lucidum (GL). Wine consumers (n = 124) were asked to complete a questionnaire and participate in a blind tasting of six GL wine products (differing [...] Read more.
This study explored wine consumers’ preferences towards a novel Australian Shiraz wine product containing Ganoderma lucidum (GL). Wine consumers (n = 124) were asked to complete a questionnaire and participate in a blind tasting of six GL wine products (differing in the amount and timing of GL extract additions). Based on individual liking scores for each GL wine product that was tasted, four hedonic clusters C1 (n = 44, preferred control and low levels of GL additions), C2 (n = 28, preferred control only), C3 (n = 26, generally preferred all GL additions) and C4 (n = 26, preferred 1 g/L additions and 4 g/L post-fermentation) were identified. Sensory attributes of the GL wine products were also profiled with rate-all-that-apply (n = 65) and the 31 sensory attributes that significantly differentiated the wines underwent principal component analysis with the hedonic clusters overlaid to explain consumers’ preferences. There was a clear separation between hedonic clusters. Sensory attributes and volatile flavor compounds that significantly differentiated the wines were subjected to partial least squares regression, which indicated the important positive drivers of liking among the hedonic clusters. Pepper and jammy aroma, 3-methylbutanoic acid (linked to fruity notes) and non-fruit aftertaste positively drove C2′s preference, whereas spice flavor and hexanoic acid (known for leafy and woody descriptors) drove C3′s liking. There were no positive drivers for C1′s liking but bitter taste, cooked vegetable, and toasty aromas drove this cluster’ dislike. C4 preferred brown appearance, tobacco aroma, and jammy and cooked vegetable flavors. These findings provide the wine industry with deeper insights into consumers’ liking towards new GL wine products targeted at the Australasian market. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
High Fibre Gluten-Free Fresh Pasta with Tiger Nut, Chickpea and Fenugreek: Technofunctional, Sensory and Nutritional Properties
Foods 2020, 9(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9010011 - 21 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Gluten-free pasta production with a low glycaemic index and improved nutritional profile is still a challenge for the food industry. In this study, pasta was produced from fenugreek (FF), chickpea (CPF) and tiger nut (TNF) flours. CPF and FF are interesting for a [...] Read more.
Gluten-free pasta production with a low glycaemic index and improved nutritional profile is still a challenge for the food industry. In this study, pasta was produced from fenugreek (FF), chickpea (CPF) and tiger nut (TNF) flours. CPF and FF are interesting for a balanced contribution of soluble and insoluble fibre by combining the health benefits of each type of fibre that promotes health. TNF, also rich in insoluble fibre, can provide additional healthy properties. The partial substitution of TNF for FF (0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10% w/w solids) was assessed, and the relation linking chemical composition, structure, cooking and rheological properties and predictive in-vitro starch digestion (eGI, expected glycaemic index) was analysed. The results revealed that FF, rich in galactomannans, not only improves the nutritional profile and lowers the eGI but also helps to naturally enhance the structure of the pasta product and, thus, cooking behaviour (higher swelling index and fewer cooking losses). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Microalgae as Functional Ingredients in Savory Food Products: Application to Wheat Crackers
Foods 2019, 8(12), 611; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8120611 - 23 Nov 2019
Cited by 5
Abstract
Crackers are widely consumed snack foods and there is an increasing trend in adding functional ingredients to their composition. In the present work, the dried biomasses of four microalgae strains—Arthrospira platensis F&M-C256, Chlorella vulgaris Allma, Tetraselmis suecica F&M-M33, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum F&M-M40—were [...] Read more.
Crackers are widely consumed snack foods and there is an increasing trend in adding functional ingredients to their composition. In the present work, the dried biomasses of four microalgae strains—Arthrospira platensis F&M-C256, Chlorella vulgaris Allma, Tetraselmis suecica F&M-M33, and Phaeodactylum tricornutum F&M-M40—were used as a source of proteins, antioxidants, and other bioactive molecules in artisanal wheat crackers. Two incorporation levels were tested: 2% (w/w) and 6% (w/w). The impact of microalgae addition was evaluated in terms of physical properties, biochemical composition, antioxidant activity, in vitro digestibility, and sensory characteristics. Microalgae crackers presented stable color and texture throughout eight weeks of storage. Microalgae crackers were slightly thinner and lighter than the control but presented a similar density in agreement with scanning electron microscope images, indicating that gas retention was not greatly affected by microalgae addition. Regarding biochemical composition, 6% A. platensis and C. vulgaris crackers presented a significantly higher protein content (13.2–13.5%), for which they could be claimed to be a “source of protein” according to the Regulation (EC) No. 1924/2006. A. platensis crackers showed the highest antioxidant activity and attained better sensory analysis scores. T. suecica and P. tricornutum crackers showed high phenolic content and antioxidant activity but attained low sensory scores mainly because of their unattractive fishy off-flavor. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Novel Ingredients Based on Grapefruit Freeze-Dried Formulations: Nutritional and Bioactive Value
Foods 2019, 8(10), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8100506 - 17 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Grapefruit is a fruit with interesting nutritional value and functional properties, but a short life. Freeze-drying (FD) is a valuable technique as it produces high-quality dehydrated products. This study is aimed to obtain new food ingredients based on freeze-dried grapefruit formulated with high [...] Read more.
Grapefruit is a fruit with interesting nutritional value and functional properties, but a short life. Freeze-drying (FD) is a valuable technique as it produces high-quality dehydrated products. This study is aimed to obtain new food ingredients based on freeze-dried grapefruit formulated with high molecular weight solutes (gum arabic and bamboo fiber) in three different proportions (F1, F2, and F3). To improve the FD, a mild microwave drying pre-treatment was applied. Influence of the water content and the presence of high molecular weight solutes on freeze-drying kinetics was tested by Midilli-Kucuk and Page models. The best FD kinetic model fit on grapefruit powders were Midilli-Kucuk for F2 and F3, and Page for F1, and the adequate freeze-drying times for F1, F2, and F3 were 24, 16, and 18 h, respectively. Final samples were evaluated for nutritional and antioxidant capacity. Gum arabic and bamboo fiber present a protector effect, which results in a significant antioxidant capacity due to the protection of flavonoids and antioxidant vitamins. These novel food ingredients could be of great interest for the food industry in order to develop foods with improved antioxidant capacity as well as enriched in natural fibers and/or micronutrients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Valorizations of Sweet Cherries Skins Phytochemicals by Extraction, Microencapsulation and Development of Value-Added Food Products
Foods 2019, 8(6), 188; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods8060188 - 01 Jun 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
Sweet cherries are processed in various ways, leading to significant amounts of underutilized by-products that can potentially be used as a source of bioactive compounds, including antioxidants. The present study focuses on identifying ways to exploit bioactive compounds from sweet cherry skins, namely [...] Read more.
Sweet cherries are processed in various ways, leading to significant amounts of underutilized by-products that can potentially be used as a source of bioactive compounds, including antioxidants. The present study focuses on identifying ways to exploit bioactive compounds from sweet cherry skins, namely the extraction, microencapsulation, and functionalizing of some food product to obtain added value. The anthocyanins from skins were extracted and encapsulated in a combination of whey proteins isolate and chitosan by freeze-drying, with an encapsulation efficiency of 77.68 ± 2.57%. The powder showed a satisfactory content in polyphenols, of which anthocyanins content was 14.48 ± 1.17 mg cyanidin 3-glucoside/100 g dry weight (D.W.) and antioxidant activity of 85.37 ± 1.18 µM Trolox/100 g D.W. The powder was morphologically analyzed, revealing the presence of coacervates, ranging in size from 12–54 μm, forming large spheresomes (up to 200 μm). The powder was used as a functional ingredient to develop two value-added food products, namely yoghurt and marshmallows. The powder was tested for its prebiotic effect on L. casei 431® in the yoghurt samples during 21 days at 4 °C, when a decrease in viability was found, up to 6 log CFU·g−1. The anthocyanins and antioxidant activity decreased in yoghurt and increased in marshmallows during storage time. The obtained results support the potential use of extracts from underutilized sources in the development of functional ingredients and value-added food products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Research

Open AccessReview
A Systematic Review of Risk Assessment Associated with Jellyfish Consumption as a Potential Novel Food
Foods 2020, 9(7), 935; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9070935 - 15 Jul 2020
Abstract
FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) predicted that the world’s population will reach over 9 billion in 2050. This condition will require an increase of the global food production by 60%. Technology and scientific research in the near future will [...] Read more.
FAO (Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations) predicted that the world’s population will reach over 9 billion in 2050. This condition will require an increase of the global food production by 60%. Technology and scientific research in the near future will soon be oriented towards optimizing the limited existing resources, reducing waste, and improving the consumption of sustainable new foods. Jellyfish could be a valid alternative among novel food. The purpose of this systematic review was to assess microbiological, chemical, physical, and allergenic risks associated with jellyfish consumption. Four research strings have been used to assess evidences about these risks. PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Item for Systematic Reviews and Meta-analysis) guidelines were applied. Finally, 14 articles were found. Results showed a good level of health safety for jellyfish consumption in terms of its allergenic and microbiological risks. No evidence was found about physical risks. As regards chemical safety, it should be fundamental to carry out a constant monitoring of the water where jellyfish are captured or bred. Periodic checks will be necessary on the finished product, such as the analysis of the aluminum content commonly used during the manufacturing process. The number of publications found was rather small, and further investigation will be necessary to enforce the knowledge on jellyfish consumption by humans. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessReview
A Review of Coffee By-Products Including Leaf, Flower, Cherry, Husk, Silver Skin, and Spent Grounds as Novel Foods within the European Union
Foods 2020, 9(5), 665; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9050665 - 21 May 2020
Cited by 3
Abstract
The coffee plant Coffea spp. offers much more than the well-known drink made from the roasted coffee bean. During its cultivation and production, a wide variety of by-products are accrued, most of which are currently unused, thermally recycled, or used as animal feed. [...] Read more.
The coffee plant Coffea spp. offers much more than the well-known drink made from the roasted coffee bean. During its cultivation and production, a wide variety of by-products are accrued, most of which are currently unused, thermally recycled, or used as animal feed. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of novel coffee products in the food sector and their current legal classification in the European Union (EU). For this purpose, we have reviewed the literature on the composition and safety of coffee flowers, leaves, pulp, husk, parchment, green coffee, silver skin, and spent coffee grounds. Some of these products have a history of consumption in Europe (green coffee), while others have already been used as traditional food in non-EU-member countries (coffee leaves, notification currently pending), or an application for authorization as novel food has already been submitted (husks, flour from spent coffee grounds). For the other products, toxicity and/or safety data appear to be lacking, necessitating further studies to fulfill the requirements of novel food applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Novel Foods and Nutritional Function)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Back to TopTop