Advances in Fruit Juices Processing and Innovative Technologies for the Development of Sustainable Functional Foods

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Food Quality and Safety".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 July 2024 | Viewed by 2096

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
CBQF—Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina—Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Porto, Portugal
Interests: food microbiology; thermal and non-thermal processes; food processing optimisation; fruits and their by-products; shelf-life of minimally processed fruits; microbial inactivation kinetics; food quality and safety; fruit juices; functional foods
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CBQF—Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina— Laboratório Associado, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Porto, Portugal
Interests: food processing; mathematical modeling; quality kinetics; predictive microbiology; non-thermal technologies; transport phenomena; design and optimisation of the food chain; sustainable technology solutions
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
CBQF - Centro de Biotecnologia e Química Fina - Laboratório Associado, Universidade Católica Portuguesa, Escola Superior de Biotecnologia, Porto, Portugal
Interests: thermal and non-thermal food processes; food quality and safety; valorization of food waste; predictive microbiology; mathematical modeling; experimental design and data analysis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fruit juice processing is essential to ensure the quality and safety of these beverages while preserving their nutritional value. Most fruit juices undergo pasteurization to effectively reduce the microbial load and enzymatic activity while minimizing the risk of spoilage. However, due to heat treatment's known drawbacks (loss of sensory qualities and nutritional content), there is a growing demand to improve and explore innovative processing techniques. In recent years, novel and sustainable technologies have emerged, offering significant progresses in fruit juice processing. Minimal processing methods such as high-pressure processing (HPP), pulsed electric fields (PEF), ultrasounds, and cold plasma treatments have been implemented to improve the product’s quality and its extend shelf life. A growing interest has also developed in enhancing fruit juices' nutritional value and functional benefits by incorporating bioactive compounds. This technique usually involves the integration of fruits rich in antioxidants or the inclusion of phytochemicals, fibers, and probiotics by microencapsulation. In addition to technological advancements, integrating sustainable practices has become a key focus in fruit juice processing. Efforts are being made to reduce water consumption, optimize energy usage, minimize packaging waste, and transform by-products into value-added products.

This Special Issue explores the latest developments, research findings, and innovations in fruit juice processing, emphasizing the application of non-thermal technologies, incorporating sustainable practices, and enhancing nutritional value by integrating bioactive compounds.

Dr. Fátima A. Miller
Dr. Cristina L.M. Silva
Dr. Teresa R.S. Brandão
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2900 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • non-thermal technologies
  • sustainable technologies
  • functional fruit juices
  • nutritional quality
  • safety
  • bioactive compounds
  • microencapsulation

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 2163 KiB  
Article
Potency of Dimethyl Dicarbonate on the Microbial Inhibition Growth Kinetics, and Quality of Passion Fruit (Passiflora edulis) Juice during Refrigerated Storage
by Khursheed Ahmad Shiekh, Akaranaj Noieaid, Poke Gadpoca, Supassorn Sermwiwatwong, Saeid Jafari, Isaya Kijpatanasilp, Randy W. Worobo and Kitipong Assatarakul
Foods 2024, 13(5), 719; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13050719 - 27 Feb 2024
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Abstract
This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) at various concentrations (0–250 ppm) in inhibiting the growth of Escherichia coli TISTR 117 and spoilage microbes in passion fruit juice (PFJ) and its impact on the physicochemical and antioxidant quality of [...] Read more.
This study aimed to investigate the effectiveness of dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) at various concentrations (0–250 ppm) in inhibiting the growth of Escherichia coli TISTR 117 and spoilage microbes in passion fruit juice (PFJ) and its impact on the physicochemical and antioxidant quality of the juice during refrigerated storage. The highest log reduction in the total viable count, yeast/molds and E. coli was attained in PFJ samples with 250 ppm of DMDC (p ≤ 0.05) added. Microbial growth inhibition by DMDC followed the first-order kinetic model with a coefficient of determination (R2) and inhibition constants (k) ranging from 0.98 to 0.99 and 0.022 to 0.042, respectively. DMDC at 0–250 ppm showed an insignificant effect on pH, °Brix, color (L*, a*, b*), ascorbic acid, total phenolic compound (TPC), total flavonoid content, and antioxidant activity (DPPH, FRAP) (p > 0.05). Control (untreated PFJ), DMDC-250 ppm, and pasteurized (15 s at 72 °C) samples were subjected to 27 days of cold storage at 4 °C. A decreasing trend in pH, total soluble solid, ascorbic acid content, DPPH and FRAP values were observed in all the samples during refrigerated storage. However, the DMDC-250 ppm sample showed a better prospect in physicochemical quality changes compared to the pasteurized and untreated control PFJ samples. ΔE values showed marked changes in the control sample than the DMDC-250 ppm and pasteurized samples at 27 days of storage. Additionally, the total viable count and yeast/mold count were augmented during storage, and an estimated shelf-life of the control, DMDC-250 ppm, and pasteurized samples was approximately 3, 24 and 18 days, respectively. In conclusion, DMDC at 250 ppm could ensure microbial safety without affecting the quality attributes of PFJ during 24 days of storage at 4 °C. Full article
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16 pages, 1504 KiB  
Article
Application of Ultrasound Treatments in the Processing and Production of High-Quality and Safe-to-Drink Kiwi Juice
by Sharayu Bhutkar, Teresa R. S. Brandão, Cristina L. M. Silva and Fátima A. Miller
Foods 2024, 13(2), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods13020328 - 20 Jan 2024
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Abstract
This study explores the potential of thermosonication as an alternative to traditional heat treatments, such as pasteurization, in the processing of fruit juices. Conventional methods often lead to undesirable quality changes in fruit juices, whereas thermosonication offers promising results regarding microbial inactivation and [...] Read more.
This study explores the potential of thermosonication as an alternative to traditional heat treatments, such as pasteurization, in the processing of fruit juices. Conventional methods often lead to undesirable quality changes in fruit juices, whereas thermosonication offers promising results regarding microbial inactivation and quality preservation. This work focused on the inactivation kinetics of Listeria innocua 2030c, a surrogate for pathogenic L. monocytogenes, in kiwifruit juice using thermosonication at 45 °C, 50 °C, and 55 °C. These treatments were compared with equivalent heat treatments. Quality attributes of the juice were also evaluated to assess process efficiency. Survival data of L. innocua were fitted with the Weibull model, estimating first decimal reduction times (δ) and shape parameters (n). The results reveal temperature and process dependencies on δ, while n remains mostly temperature and treatment independent. Thermosonication outperforms heat treatment, achieving higher L. innocua reductions while retaining quality attributes like pH, soluble solid content, and total phenolics and chlorophylls. Thermosonication at 55 °C stands out, providing a 6.2-log-cycle reduction in just 3 min with superior quality retention. These findings highlight the synergistic effect of temperature and ultrasound, making mild heat processes feasible while enhancing product quality. Thermosonication, particularly at 55 °C, emerges as an effective alternative to traditional thermal treatments for fruit juices, offering improved microbial safety without compromising product quality. Full article
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