Special Issue "Dairy Products Consumption and Health Benefits"

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Dairy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 March 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Christos Soukoulis
Website
Guest Editor
Environmental Research and Innovation Department, Luxembourg Institute of Science and Technology, Belvaux, Luxembourg
Interests: dairy proteins; food hydrocolloids; food waste valorization; food structure and rheology; probiotics; functional food innovation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Claire Gaiani
Website
Guest Editor
LIBio, Laboratoire d’Ingénierie des Biomolécules, Université de Lorraine, 2 av de la Forêt de Haye, BP 20163, F-54505, Vandoeuvre lès Nancy, France
Interests: food powders (including dairy); food surface characterization; food structure; bioactive protection into dairy matrices; lactic acid bacteria

Special Issue Information

For centuries, milk and its derivatives (e.g., cheese, yogurt, butter) have had a recognized role in maintaining a healthy human diet regime. Despite several controversies relating to the health, sustainability, and ecological footprint of dairy products, the latest evidence from meta-analyses and systematic epidemiological studies is highly supportive of the importance of dairy product consumption for counteracting the risk of several degenerative chronic disease such as cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, cancer, osteoporosis, sarcopenia, etc. In addition, emerging food processing and design strategies have been highly assistive in enhancing the nutritional fingerprint and post-ingestion bioactivity of dairy products without compromising their sensory cross-modal and shelf-life qualities.

In this Special Issue, we invite original research articles, short communications, and review papers covering at least one of the following topics:

  • Understanding the nutritional value and human health-benefit-conferring role of traditional or ethnic dairy products produced via lactic acid fermentation;
  • Dairy product reformulation strategies to enhance their nutritional, satiety, and sensory quality scores;
  • Impact of emerging food processing methods (ultrasound, microwave, high hydrostatic pressure, pulsed electric fields, ohmic, ultra-high-pressure homogenization, etc.) on the nutritional value and bio-functionality of dairy products;
  • Promoting personalized nutrition plans via additive manufacturing (3D printing) using dairy-protein-based bio-inks;
  • Use of dairy products as programmable functional food matrices for buccal, upper or lower digestive tract delivery of bioactive compounds (polyphenols, carotenoids, essential lipids, etc.), probiotics, or postbiotics;
  • Understanding the colloidal and biofunctional interplay between dairy ingredients and food macromolecules (proteins, polysaccharides, lipids) of plant, microalgal, or microbial origin using novel characterization techniques.

Dr. Christos Soukoulis
Prof. Dr. Claire Gaiani
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Foods is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • milk and its derivatives
  • whey protein and caseinates
  • functional dairy products
  • dairy product reformulation
  • dairy based delivery systems
  • bioactive peptides
  • probiotics, prebiotics and postbiotics
  • antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity
  • satiety

Published Papers (5 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Development of Antioxidant and Antihypertensive Properties during Growth of Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus rhamnosus and Lactobacillus reuteri on Cow’s Milk: Fermentation and Peptidomics Study
Foods 2021, 10(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010017 - 23 Dec 2020
Abstract
Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins are an active research area. Exhibiting numerous positive physiological effects on digestive, cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems, these peptides thought to be one of the most promising ingredients for functional food. Generally, these peptides are inactive within [...] Read more.
Bioactive peptides derived from milk proteins are an active research area. Exhibiting numerous positive physiological effects on digestive, cardiovascular, immune and nervous systems, these peptides thought to be one of the most promising ingredients for functional food. Generally, these peptides are inactive within the parent proteins and can be liberated during milk fermentation by the specific proteolytic systems of various Lactobacillus spp. Here we present the study of milk fermentation by Lactobacillus helveticus NK1, Lactobacillus rhamnosus F and Lactobacillus reuteri LR1 strains. It was demonstrated that the antioxidant activity of the milk fermented by these strains concomitantly increased with the strains’ proteolytic activity. For the angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity, the same tendency was not observed. Although the proteolytic activity of L. helveticus NK1 was two times higher than that of L. rhamnosus F, the milk fermented by these strains showed comparable ACE inhibition. The analysis of the peptide profiles of the fermented milk samples allowed us to hypothesize that some previously unreported peptides can be produced by L. rhamnosus F. In addition, it was demonstrated that these potential ACE-inhibiting peptides originated from the C-terminus of αS2-casein. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption and Health Benefits)
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Open AccessArticle
Formulation of Heat-Induced Whey Protein Gels for Extrusion-Based 3D Printing
Foods 2021, 10(1), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10010008 - 22 Dec 2020
Abstract
This study investigated the extrusion-based 3D printability of heat-induced whey protein gels as protein rich food inks. In particular, the effects of ionic strength by the addition of NaCl (0–250 mM), protein content (10%, 15%, 20%), fat content (0%, 10%), and partial substitution [...] Read more.
This study investigated the extrusion-based 3D printability of heat-induced whey protein gels as protein rich food inks. In particular, the effects of ionic strength by the addition of NaCl (0–250 mM), protein content (10%, 15%, 20%), fat content (0%, 10%), and partial substitution of whey protein isolate (WPI) with microparticulated whey protein (MWP) or micellar casein isolate (MCI) on printability were assessed. Texture analysis, specifically Young’s modulus, rheological measurements including yield stress, and creep–recovery behavior were used to characterize the gels. Modifications of the formulation in terms of ionic strength, increased protein content, and the formation of emulsion gels were insufficient to maintain a continuous extrusion process or shape stability after printing. However, the substitution of WPI with MWP created more viscoeleastic gels with improved printability and shape retention of the 3D cube structure after deposition. The partial replacement of WPI with MCI led to phase separation and 3D-printed cubes that collapsed after deposition. A narrow range of rheological material properties make WPI and MWP emulsion gels promising food inks for extrusion-based 3D printing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption and Health Benefits)
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Open AccessArticle
Lime Juice Enhances Calcium Bioaccessibility from Yogurt Snacks Formulated with Whey Minerals and Proteins
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1873; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121873 - 16 Dec 2020
Abstract
Yogurt-based snacks originally with a calcium content between 0.10 and 0.17 mmol/g dry matter were enriched with a whey mineral concentrate and whey protein isolate or hydrolysate. Whey mineral concentrate was added to increase the total amount of calcium by 0.030 mmol/g dry [...] Read more.
Yogurt-based snacks originally with a calcium content between 0.10 and 0.17 mmol/g dry matter were enriched with a whey mineral concentrate and whey protein isolate or hydrolysate. Whey mineral concentrate was added to increase the total amount of calcium by 0.030 mmol/g dry matter. Calcium bioaccessibility was determined following an in vitro protocol including oral, gastric, and intestinal digestion, with special focus on the effect of lime juice quantifying calcium concentration and activity. Calcium bioaccessibility, defined as soluble calcium divided by total calcium after intestinal digestion amounted to between 17 and 25% for snacks without lime juice. For snacks with lime juice, the bioaccessibility increased to between 24 and 40%, an effect attributed to the presence of citric acid. Citric acid increased the calcium solubility both from whey mineral concentrate and yogurt, and the citrate anion kept supersaturated calcium soluble in the chyme. The binding of calcium in the chyme from snacks with or without lime juice was compared electrochemically, showing that citrate increased the amount of bound calcium but with lower affinity. The results indicated that whey minerals, a waste from cheese production, may be utilized in snacks enhancing calcium bioaccessibility when combined with lime juice. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption and Health Benefits)
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Open AccessArticle
The Antimutagenic and Antioxidant Activity of Fermented Milk Supplemented with Cudrania tricuspidata Powder
Foods 2020, 9(12), 1762; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9121762 - 28 Nov 2020
Abstract
In this study, Cudrania tricuspidata (CT) containing abundant phytochemicals, such as xanthones and flavonoids, was evaluated as an additive to fortify the functionality and organoleptic quality of fermented milk. The physicochemical, functional, and sensory properties of fermented milk supplemented with different concentrations of [...] Read more.
In this study, Cudrania tricuspidata (CT) containing abundant phytochemicals, such as xanthones and flavonoids, was evaluated as an additive to fortify the functionality and organoleptic quality of fermented milk. The physicochemical, functional, and sensory properties of fermented milk supplemented with different concentrations of CT powder were investigated. Increasing amounts of CT powder elevated the malic acid concentration, increasing the total acidity and decreasing the pH of fermented milk supplemented with CT powder. The viable cell count and free sugar contents of fermented milk indicated that supplementing with CT powder improved lactic acid fermentation slightly. The color of fermented milk supplemented with CT powder was darker, redder, yellower, and more pleasing than the control fermented milk. The total phenolic and flavonoid contents of fermented milk supplemented with CT powder rose as the concentration of supplemented CT powder increased, resulting in enhanced antioxidant and antimutagenic activities. The CT powder improved the functionality of the fermented milk; still, at 2% or more, it had some unfavorable sensory properties, such as sourness, taste, and texture, which reduced the overall consumer preference. Therefore, a CT powder concentration of 0.5% or 1% may be acceptable to consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption and Health Benefits)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Pasteurization and Storage on Dynamic In Vitro Gastric Digestion of Milk Proteins: Quantitative Insights Based on Peptidomics
Foods 2020, 9(8), 998; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods9080998 - 25 Jul 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
It is important to evaluate the nutritional quality of milk during the shelf-life, especially during home storage, from a consumer viewpoint. In this study, we investigated the impact of pasteurization (85 °C/15 s) and subsequent storage (at 4 °C for 7 days) on [...] Read more.
It is important to evaluate the nutritional quality of milk during the shelf-life, especially during home storage, from a consumer viewpoint. In this study, we investigated the impact of pasteurization (85 °C/15 s) and subsequent storage (at 4 °C for 7 days) on the coagulation behavior of milk and protein digestibility in a dynamic in vitro gastric digestion test. A high level of hydration in curd formed in pasteurized milk upon 7-day cold storage compared to raw and pasteurized milk, indicating fast pepsin diffusion in the interior of curds, increasing the hydrolysis rate. The digesta collected at various time points throughout the gastric digestion were studied using o-phthaldialdehyde (OPA), sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and amino acid analysis. These results showed that milk proteins were hydrolyzed quickly upon a long period of cold storage. Additionally, qualitative and quantitative results obtained using LC-MS/MS exhibited significant differences between samples, especially in pasteurized milk upon cold storage. Processing and storage played a decisive role in bioactive peptide generation. Such knowledge could provide insights into and directions for the storage of pasteurized milk for further clinical studies on protein bioavailability and the generation of bioactive peptides for desired health outcomes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Dairy Products Consumption and Health Benefits)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Evaluation of casein micelles from skimmed fresh milk as a potential vehicle to deliver drugs in pediatric formulations
Authors: Ana I. Fernandes; João P. Aguiar; Sophie Scheppe; Tânia A.P. Fernandes; Maryia I. Brachkova; Joana T. Pinto; João F. Pinto
Affiliation: Instituto Universitário Egas Moniz, Campus Universitário, Quinta da Granja, Monte de Caparica, 2829-511 Caparica, Portugal. Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade de Lisboa, Av. Prof. Gama Pinto, 1649-003 Lisboa, Portugal

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