Bioactive Compounds from Cereal By-Products and Their Potential Health Benefits

A special issue of Foods (ISSN 2304-8158). This special issue belongs to the section "Grain".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (20 November 2022) | Viewed by 2758

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Key Laboratory of Coarse Cereal Processing, Ministry of Agriculture and Rural Affairs, Sichuan Engineering & Technology Research Center of Coarse Cereal Industrialization, School of Food and Biological Engineering, Chengdu University, Chengdu 610106, China
Interests: functional foods; cereal science & technology; phytochemicals; polyphenols

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Cereal grains are a major source of human food and their production has steadily been increased during the last several decades to meet the demand of our increasing world population. Several epidemiological studies have found a relation between intake of whole cereal grain and reducing the risk of chronic diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, type II diabetes, and gastrointestinal disorders. Health benefits of whole cereal grain could be attributed to the synergistic effects of micronutrients and phytochemicals, such as phenolic acids, sterols, tocols, tannins, and anthocyanins, as well as dietary fibre, polysaccharide, bioactive peptides, which are generally found in the seed and the outer bran layer of cereal. Therefore, it is very important to find out efficient methods to identify and quantify the functional ingredients, to search strategies and processing technologies to enhance the content and bioavailability of nutrients, bioactive compounds, and bioactive macromolecules from cereal, as well as explain their possible health benefits for humans.

Now, all researchers are invited to submit their original and high-quality research articles or reviews concerning the bioactive compounds from cereal by-products and their potential health benefits to this Special Issue.

Topics covered in this Special Issue include (but are not limited to):

  • Identification and chemical structure analysis of bioactive compounds derived from cereal;
  • Structure and bioactivity changes during processing and preservation;
  • Encapsulation, bioaccesibility, and bioavailability of active ingredients;
  • In vitro and in vivo evaluation of biological properties and related mechanisms.

Dr. Jianbo Xiao
Prof. Dr. Liang Zou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • extraction and purification of bioactive ingredients from cereals and by-products
  • structure–activity relationship of bioactive ingredients from cereals and by-products
  • technological properties
  • bioaccesibility and bioavailability of bioactive ingredients from cereals and by-products
  • health benefits of bioactive ingredients from cereals and by-products
  • functional foods based cereals and by-products

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Research

11 pages, 18984 KiB  
Article
Biochemical and Structural Characterization of Ferulated Arabinoxylans Extracted from Nixtamalized and Non-Nixtamalized Maize Bran
by Muzzamal Hussain, Farhan Saeed, Bushra Niaz, Ali Imran and Tabussam Tufail
Foods 2022, 11(21), 3374; https://doi.org/10.3390/foods11213374 - 26 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2077
Abstract
Maize bran is a good source of non-starch polysaccharides, having various bioactive compounds. In the current research, we extracted the ferulated arabinoxylans from nixtamalized maize bran (NMB) and non-nixtamalized maize bran (NNMB) and explored their biochemical composition (monosaccharides, phenolic compounds) and structural characteristics [...] Read more.
Maize bran is a good source of non-starch polysaccharides, having various bioactive compounds. In the current research, we extracted the ferulated arabinoxylans from nixtamalized maize bran (NMB) and non-nixtamalized maize bran (NNMB) and explored their biochemical composition (monosaccharides, phenolic compounds) and structural characteristics (FTIR, SEM and XRD) as well as antioxidant activity. Results showed that contents of ferulated arabinoxylans were 8.1 ± 0.04% and 6.8 ± 0.02 in NMB and NNMB, respectively. Moreover, the purity of arabinoxylans was 60.1 ± 0.8% and 57.04 ± 0.7% in NMB and NNMB ferulated arabinoxylans. Furthermore, ferulated arabinoxylans have higher arabinose, xylose and ferulic acid contents. FTIR spectra of NMB and NNMB ferulated arabinoxylans depicted the presence of polysaccharide compounds and the corresponding band was observed at 993 cm−1, which is due to glycosidic bond vibration. In addition, absorbance regions of arabinoxylans between 900 cm−1 to 1200 cm−1 were observed. Moreover, SEM micrographs of ferulated arabinoxylans had visible rough and porous surface morphology. Further, ferulated arabinoxylans of NMB and NNMB did not exhibit any sharp peaks in XRD graphs, attributed to their amorphous nature. However, XRD 2θ showed peaks at 20.0°, which predominantly indicated that the material has an amorphous state with small crystalline regions in the sample, which shows the presence of xylans (small and narrow sharp peaks). Full article
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