Special Issue "Membrane Bioreactors"

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation Process Design".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2017).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Mohammad Taherzadeh
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Swedish Centre for Resource Recovery, University of Borås, 501 90 Borås, Sweden
Interests: waste biorefinery; bioprocess; ethanol; biogas; pretreatment; fermentation; fungi
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Membrane Bioreactors (MBR) have had a great development as of the last few decades. The notable development of MBR in industry has been for wastewater treatment. The advantage of MBR is to create high cell density in bioreactors, and, therefore, to reduce the retention time of the fermentation process. As the technology develops, the attention to MBR for other applications in fermentation processes, to produce energy, biofuels, and biomaterials, is increasing. This Special Issue is dedicated to exploring advanced applications and developments of MBR in fermentation technology.

Prof. Dr. Mohammad J. Taherzadeh
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • membrane bioreactors
  • membrane
  • encapsulation
  • biofuels
  • biomaterials
  • fermentation

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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Article
Production of Edible Fungi from Potato Protein Liquor (PPL) in Airlift Bioreactor
Fermentation 2017, 3(1), 12; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation3010012 - 21 Mar 2017
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 3878
Abstract
Potato protein liquor (PPL), a side stream from the potato starch industry, is normally used as fertilizer. However, with more than 100 g/L of sugars, 20 g/L of Kjeldahl nitrogen and Chemical Oxigen Demand (COD) of 300 g/L, it represents serious environmental challenges. [...] Read more.
Potato protein liquor (PPL), a side stream from the potato starch industry, is normally used as fertilizer. However, with more than 100 g/L of sugars, 20 g/L of Kjeldahl nitrogen and Chemical Oxigen Demand (COD) of 300 g/L, it represents serious environmental challenges. The use of PPL for fungal cultivation is a promising solution to convert this waste into valuable products. In this study, PPL was characterized and used to cultivate edible zygomycete Rhizopus oryzae, which is widely used in Southeast Asian cuisine to prepare e.g., tempeh. Moreover, it can be potentially used as a protein source in animal feed worldwide. Under the best conditions, 65.47 ± 2.91 g of fungal biomass per litre of PPL was obtained in airlift bioreactors. The total Kjeldahl nitrogen content of the biomass was above 70 g/kg dry biomass. The best results showed 51% reduction of COD and 98.7% reduction in the total sugar content of PPL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Bioreactors)
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Article
Syngas Biomethanation in a Semi-Continuous Reverse Membrane Bioreactor (RMBR)
Fermentation 2016, 2(2), 8; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation2020008 - 25 Mar 2016
Cited by 26 | Viewed by 3210
Abstract
Syngas biomethanation is a potent bio-conversion route, utilizing microorganisms to assimilate intermediate gases to produce methane. However, since methanogens have a long doubling time, the reactor works best at a low dilution rate; otherwise, the cells can be washed out during the continuous [...] Read more.
Syngas biomethanation is a potent bio-conversion route, utilizing microorganisms to assimilate intermediate gases to produce methane. However, since methanogens have a long doubling time, the reactor works best at a low dilution rate; otherwise, the cells can be washed out during the continuous fermentation process. In this study, the performance of a practical reverse membrane bioreactor (RMBR) with high cell density for rapid syngas biomethanation as well as a co-substrate of syngas and organic substances was examined in a long-term fermentation process of 154 days and compared with the reactors of the free cells (FCBR). The RMBR reached maximum capacities of H2, CO, and CO2 conversion of 7.0, 15.2, and 4.0 mmol/Lreactor.day, respectively, at the organic loading rate of 3.40 gCOD/L.day. The highest methane production rate from the RMBR was 186.0 mL/Lreactor.day on the 147th day, compared to the highest rate in the FCBR, 106.3 mL/Lreactor.day, on the 58th day. The RMBR had the ability to maintain a high methanation capacity by retaining the microbial cells, which were at a high risk for cell wash out. Consequently, the system was able to convert more syngas simultaneously with the organic compounds into methane compared to the FCBR. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Bioreactors)
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Review
Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor Effluent Reuse: A Review of Microbial Safety Concerns
Fermentation 2017, 3(3), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation3030039 - 07 Aug 2017
Cited by 22 | Viewed by 4899
Abstract
Broad and increasing interest in sustainable wastewater treatment has led a paradigm shift towards more efficient means of treatment system operation. A key aspect of improving overall sustainability is the potential for direct wastewater effluent reuse. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) have been identified [...] Read more.
Broad and increasing interest in sustainable wastewater treatment has led a paradigm shift towards more efficient means of treatment system operation. A key aspect of improving overall sustainability is the potential for direct wastewater effluent reuse. Anaerobic membrane bioreactors (AnMBRs) have been identified as an attractive option for producing high quality and nutrient-rich effluents during the treatment of municipal wastewaters. The introduction of direct effluent reuse does, however, raise several safety concerns related to its application. Among those concerns are the microbial threats associated with pathogenic bacteria as well as the emerging issues associated with antibiotic-resistant bacteria and the potential for proliferation of antibiotic resistance genes. Although there is substantial research evaluating these topics from the perspectives of anaerobic digestion and membrane bioreactors separately, little is known regarding how AnMBR systems can contribute to pathogen and antibiotic resistance removal and propagation in wastewater effluents. The aim of this review is to provide a current assessment of existing literature on anaerobic and membrane-based treatment systems as they relate to these microbial safety issues and utilize this assessment to identify areas of potential future research to evaluate the suitability of AnMBRs for direct effluent reuse. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Membrane Bioreactors)
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