Advances in Resource Recovery from Organic Wastes (ARROW)

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation Process Design".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2022) | Viewed by 19636

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Faculty of Science, Hong Kong Baptist University, 224 Waterloo Road, Kowloon Tong, Hong Kong
Interests: microbial fermentation and resource recovery from biowaste; polyhydroxyalkanoates production from food waste; biological nutrient removal and wastewater treatment; electro-fermentation; environmental data analytics; mathematical and statistical modeling for bioprocess design and optimization

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Guest Editor
Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Motilal Nehru National Institute of Technology Allahabad, Uttar Pradesh, India
Interests: Environmental biotechnology; Bioreactor for wastewater treatment; Bioremediation and resource recovery; Environmental nanotechnology

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Organic wastes like food waste and waste-activated sludge generated from municipal sources pose a serious threat to human and environmental health. Their safe and sustainable disposal has been a major challenge for countries across the globe. Both food waste and waste-activated sludge have high energy content, which can be biologically treated to capture carbon and create a net negative emission. Recovery of energy and resources (e.g., nutrients, value-added commercial chemicals) from these organic wastes is attractive from both environmental and economic viewpoints.

This Special Issue aims to collect the latest research innovations on organic waste treatment for resource recovery. It will cover thematic areas like dark fermentation, photo-fermentation, co-digestion, pre-treatment of organic waste, metabolic pathways of fermentative bacteria, microbial population dynamics, anaerobic digestion, biofuel production, biochemical production and purification, volatile fatty acid utilization for nutrient removal, and kinetic modeling for bioprocess optimization.

This Special Issue seeks contributions from researchers, scientists, and industry experts on “Advances in Resource Recovery from Organic Wastes (ARROW)”. Therefore, we invite original research papers and systematic reviews for this Special Issue.

Dr. Nirakar Pradhan
Dr. Joyabrata Mal
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  •  fermentation
  •  anaerobic digestion
  •  co-digestion
  •  food waste
  •  waste activated sludge
  •  biofuels
  •  pretreatment
  •  kinetic modeling
  •  volatile fatty acids
  •  metagenomics
  •  metabolic pathways

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 2813 KiB  
Article
Characteristics of Soil Amendment Material from Food Waste Disposed of in Bioplastic Bags
by Padtaraporn Kwanyun, Nontawat Praditwattana, Lalitsuda Phutthimethakul, Chidsanuphong Chart-asa, Nuttakorn Intaravicha and Nuta Supakata
Fermentation 2023, 9(2), 97; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9020097 - 21 Jan 2023
Viewed by 1419
Abstract
Effective food waste management is key to a sustainable future. We herein aimed at assessing the composition and the amount of food waste generated in the Chamchuri (CU) Terrace condominium (floors 18–22) in Bangkok (Thailand), producing soil amendment material from this same food [...] Read more.
Effective food waste management is key to a sustainable future. We herein aimed at assessing the composition and the amount of food waste generated in the Chamchuri (CU) Terrace condominium (floors 18–22) in Bangkok (Thailand), producing soil amendment material from this same food waste and examining the effect of bioplastic bags on composting. The condominium generated 29.01 kg of general waste per day. The food waste (6.26 kg/day) was classified into “available” and “unavailable” food waste, accounting for 3.26 and 3.00 kg/day, respectively. The composting of the food waste lasted 45 days and was undertaken under three experimental conditions: (i) control (no food waste), treatment 1 (T1: food waste), and treatment 2 (T2: food waste along with pieces of bioplastic bags). The physicochemical analysis of the final composts of these treatments revealed that T2 could be used as soil amendment material after enrichment of its macronutrient composition and an increase in fermentation time. Interestingly, the T2 bioplastics were characterized by a lack of holes or were fragmented into pieces larger than 5 mm. In conclusion, food waste management in the CU Terrace condominium can use food waste collected in bioplastic bags as soil amendment material. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Resource Recovery from Organic Wastes (ARROW))
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15 pages, 2793 KiB  
Article
Bio-Electrochemical Performance of a Ceramic Microbial Fuel Cell Treating Kitchen Waste Leachate: Effect of Organic Loading Rate and Anode Electrode Surface Area
by Rishi Gurjar and Manaswini Behera
Fermentation 2022, 8(10), 544; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8100544 - 15 Oct 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 1418
Abstract
Performance evaluation of a ceramic microbial fuel cell (CMFC) by varying organic strength, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and anode electrode surface area (AESA) to treat leachate generated from acidogenesis of kitchen waste (KW) was studied by the central composite design of experiment. The [...] Read more.
Performance evaluation of a ceramic microbial fuel cell (CMFC) by varying organic strength, hydraulic retention time (HRT) and anode electrode surface area (AESA) to treat leachate generated from acidogenesis of kitchen waste (KW) was studied by the central composite design of experiment. The increase in organic loading rate (OLR) positively affected power density (PD) while negatively influencing organic removal and coulombic efficiency (CE). This behavior is possible due to substrate inhibition and the coercive effect of low HRT, i.e., substrate washout, biofilm abrasion, and reduced contact period, while at high HRT, the volatile fatty acid (VFA) degradation improved. Since acetic acid is the final product of long-chain VFAs degradation, a pseudo consumption order for VFAs was obtained: butyric > propionic > acetic. The AESA aided organics removal and PD but had a negligible effect on CE. According to ANOVA, the COD removal was linearly modeled, while PD and CE were quadratic. The validation runs (VR) proved efficient as the highest COD removal was for VR2 (83.7 ± 3.6%), while maximum PD and CE values obtained were 0.224 ± 0.02 W/m3 and 2.62 ± 0.33%, respectively, for VR3, supported by the lower anode potential. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Resource Recovery from Organic Wastes (ARROW))
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12 pages, 774 KiB  
Article
Evaluating the Influence of Microbial Fermentation on the Nutritional Value of Soybean Meal
by Stanislav Sukhikh, Olga Kalashnikova, Svetlana Ivanova, Alexander Prosekov, Olesia Krol, Olga Kriger, Nataly Fedovskikh and Olga Babich
Fermentation 2022, 8(9), 458; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8090458 - 13 Sep 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 3004
Abstract
The aim of this article is to increase the nutritional value of soybean meal while reducing the content of antinutrients by microbial fermentation of soybean meal with a mixed culture of probiotic microorganisms (Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus niger, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, [...] Read more.
The aim of this article is to increase the nutritional value of soybean meal while reducing the content of antinutrients by microbial fermentation of soybean meal with a mixed culture of probiotic microorganisms (Bacillus subtilis, Aspergillus niger, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Lactiplantibacillus plantarum) at two different hydromodules. The addition of microorganisms increased the content of easily digestible protein and amine nitrogen in fermented soybean meal (30:110 and 30:130, hydromodulus soybean meal:water) while decreasing urease activity (hydromodulus 30:110). The positive effect of microbial fermentation on the mineral composition of soybean meal was demonstrated. The ability of microorganisms in the fermentation process to increase the content of protein, essential amino acids, and macro- and microelements in soybean meal while decreasing anti-nutritional factors opens up possibilities for using this technology to advance animal husbandry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Resource Recovery from Organic Wastes (ARROW))
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16 pages, 1179 KiB  
Article
Production of Single-Cell Protein from Fruit Peel Wastes Using Palmyrah Toddy Yeast
by Punniamoorthy Thiviya, Ashoka Gamage, Ranganathan Kapilan, Othmane Merah and Terrence Madhujith
Fermentation 2022, 8(8), 355; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8080355 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 12 | Viewed by 4556
Abstract
Single-cell protein (SCP) from agro-waste material has gained increased attention in the recent past as a relatively cheap and alternative protein source to meet the nutritional demand generated by the fast-growing population. Furthermore, bioconversion of these wastes into SCP such as value-added products [...] Read more.
Single-cell protein (SCP) from agro-waste material has gained increased attention in the recent past as a relatively cheap and alternative protein source to meet the nutritional demand generated by the fast-growing population. Furthermore, bioconversion of these wastes into SCP such as value-added products reduce the environmental-related issues. In this study, locally available pineapple (Ananas comosus), watermelon (Citrullus lanatus), papaya (Carica papaya), sour orange (Citrus medica), banana (Musa acuminata) and mango (Mangifera indica) peel wastes were investigated for their suitability to produce SCP using palmyrah (Borassus flabellifer) toddy carrying natural mixed yeast and bacteria culture under liquid state fermentation system. Moreover, this study attempted to select the best substrate and the optimized process condition for SCP production to increase the protein yield. The physicochemical properties of selected fruit peels were analyzed. The sterilized peel extracts (10%, v/v) were inoculated with 5 mL of palmyrah toddy and allowed to ferment in a shaking incubator at 100 rpm for 48 h in triplicate At the end of fermentation, the sediments were collected by centrifugation at 1252× g, oven-dried, and the dry weight was taken to determine the protein content. The biomass yield ranged from 5.3 ± 0.6 to 11.7 ± 0.8 g/L, with the least biomass yield being observed with watermelon peels while the maximum yield was observed with papaya peels. Papaya peel generated a significantly higher (p < 0.05) amount of protein (52.4 ± 0.4%) followed by pineapple (49.7 ± 1.3%), watermelon (45.2 ± 0.7%), banana (30.4 ± 0.6%), sour orange (29.5 ± 1.2%) and mango (24.6 ± 0.2%) peels. The optimum condition for the fermentation of papaya waste was pH 5.0, 25 °C, and 24 h. Nucleic acid reduction treatment significantly reduces dry weight and protein content of biomass. It can be concluded that papaya peel waste is a suitable substrate for protein-rich cell biomass production using the natural toddy mixed culture of palmyrah. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Resource Recovery from Organic Wastes (ARROW))
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11 pages, 3114 KiB  
Article
Antifungal Agent Chitooligosaccharides Derived from Solid-State Fermentation of Shrimp Shell Waste by Pseudonocardia antitumoralis 18D36-A1
by Widyastuti Widyastuti, Fendi Setiawan, Chasya Al Afandy, Arik Irawan, Aspita Laila, Ni Luh Gede Ratna Juliasih, Wawan Abdullah Setiawan, Masayoshi Arai, John Hendri and Andi Setiawan
Fermentation 2022, 8(8), 353; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation8080353 - 26 Jul 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 2513
Abstract
Shrimp shell waste is a potential source of the biopolymer chitin. Through fermentation, chitin can be converted into its derivative products. This study aimed to isolate and characterize the products of the biodegradation of chitin from shrimp shell waste through a solid-state fermentation [...] Read more.
Shrimp shell waste is a potential source of the biopolymer chitin. Through fermentation, chitin can be converted into its derivative products. This study aimed to isolate and characterize the products of the biodegradation of chitin from shrimp shell waste through a solid-state fermentation process using actinomycetes. Actinomycete isolates were obtained from tunicate marine biota collected from the waters of Buleleng, Bali, using a dilution technique on 1% chitin colloid agar medium. The isolated actinomycetes were cultivated on a shrimp shell waste medium for 7 days, and then the products of the biodegradation of the oligomers were extracted using water. The extracts of the biodegradation products of the shrimp shells were isolated through several chromatographic steps and analyzed using LC–MS–MS, and the bioactivity of the biodegradation products against fungi was tested. The morphological observations and phylogenetic analysis showed that the isolate 18D36-A1 was a rare actinomycete with the proposed name Pseudonocardia antitumoralis 18D36-A1. The results of the analysis using TLC showed that the solid-state fermented water isolate 18D36-A1 produced several oligomeric components. These results indicate that the isolate 18D36-A1 was able to convert chitin into chitooligosaccharides. Further isolation of the extract produced the active fraction D36A1C38, which can inhibit the growth of fungi by 74% at a concentration of 1 mg/mL. This initial information is very important for further studies related to the development of a solid-state fermentation process for obtaining bioactive compounds from shrimp shell waste. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Resource Recovery from Organic Wastes (ARROW))
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Review

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21 pages, 2666 KiB  
Review
Constructed Wetland Coupled Microbial Fuel Cell: A Clean Technology for Sustainable Treatment of Wastewater and Bioelectricity Generation
by Shiwangi Kesarwani, Diksha Panwar, Joyabrata Mal, Nirakar Pradhan and Radha Rani
Fermentation 2023, 9(1), 6; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9010006 - 22 Dec 2022
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 5436
Abstract
The availability of clean water and the depletion of non-renewable resources provide challenges to modern society. The widespread use of conventional wastewater treatment necessitates significant financial and energy expenditure. Constructed Wetland Microbial Fuel Cells (CW-MFCs), a more recent alternative technology that incorporates a [...] Read more.
The availability of clean water and the depletion of non-renewable resources provide challenges to modern society. The widespread use of conventional wastewater treatment necessitates significant financial and energy expenditure. Constructed Wetland Microbial Fuel Cells (CW-MFCs), a more recent alternative technology that incorporates a Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) inside a Constructed Wetland (CW), can alleviate these problems. By utilizing a CW’s inherent redox gradient, MFC can produce electricity while also improving a CW’s capacity for wastewater treatment. Electroactive bacteria in the anaerobic zone oxidize the organic contaminants in the wastewater, releasing electrons and protons in the process. Through an external circuit, these electrons travel to the cathode and produce electricity. Researchers have demonstrated the potential of CW-MFC technology in harnessing bio-electricity from wastewater while achieving pollutant removal at the lab and pilot scales, using both domestic and industrial wastewater. However, several limitations, such as inadequate removal of nitrogen, phosphates, and toxic organic/inorganic pollutants, limits its applicability on a large scale. In addition, the whole system must be well optimized to achieve effective wastewater treatment along with energy, as the ecosystem of the CW-MFC is large, and has diverse biotic and abiotic components which interact with each other in a dynamic manner. Therefore, by modifying important components and optimizing various influencing factors, the performance of this hybrid system in terms of wastewater treatment and power generation can be improved, making CW-MFCs a cost-effective, cleaner, and more sustainable approach for wastewater treatment that can be used in real-world applications in the future. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Resource Recovery from Organic Wastes (ARROW))
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