Metabolomics Approaches in Fermented Foods: Unraveling Health Benefits and Enhancing Food Quality

A special issue of Fermentation (ISSN 2311-5637). This special issue belongs to the section "Fermentation for Food and Beverages".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 May 2024) | Viewed by 7072

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Food Science, College of Agriculture and Veterinary Medicine, United Arab Emirates University (UAEU), Al Ain P.O. Box 15551, United Arab Emirates
Interests: exopolysaccharides; fermentation and fermented products; halal functional foods; milk and fermented milk products (yogurt & cheese); probiotics and functional foods; probiotics and its impact on foodborne pathogens; transforming traditional foods into healthy products
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Guest Editor
School of Agriculture, Food & Ecosystem Sciences, Faculty of Science, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia
Interests: probiotics; prebiotics; dairy products and food quality and safety
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Guest Editor
Institute of Agro-Products Processing Science and Technology, Sichuan Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Chengdu 610066, China
Interests: fermented plant-based products; probiotics; prebiotics; functional metabolites from fermented plant-based products; postbiotics from fermented plant-based products; gut microbiota and fermented plant-based products
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Fermented foods have been consumed by various cultures for centuries and are known for their unique flavors, textures, and nutritional properties. The fermentation process involves the metabolic activities of microorganisms, leading to the production of a wide range of bioactive compounds. Metabolomics, as a powerful analytical tool, allows for the comprehensive analysis of the small-molecule metabolites present in fermented foods. By employing targeted and untargeted metabolomics approaches, researchers can identify and quantify these metabolites, providing valuable insights into their composition, formation, and potential health effects.

This Special Issue welcomes contributions that delve into various aspects of metabolomics in fermented foods. It covers topics such as the characterization of microbial communities and their metabolic activities, the identification and profiling of bioactive compounds, the evaluation of fermentation conditions and optimization strategies, and the exploration of the impact of fermented foods on the gut microbiota and human health. Additionally, this Special Issue also includes a focus on the volatile metabolomics of fermented foods, which plays a crucial role in their aroma and flavor profiles.

We invite researchers, scientists, and practitioners from the fields of food science, nutrition, microbiology, metabolomics, and related disciplines to contribute their original research, reviews, and perspectives to this Special Issue. We encourage the submission of innovative studies that highlight the applications of metabolomics in understanding the health benefits of fermented foods, optimizing the fermentation processes, and ensuring the production of high-quality fermented products.

By bringing together a collection of diverse studies, this Special Issue aims to advance our understanding of the complex interactions between microorganisms, metabolites, and human health in the context of fermented foods. We believe that this knowledge will contribute to the development of innovative strategies for the production of fermented foods with enhanced health benefits and superior food quality.

The proposed Special Issue invites contributions covering a range of topics related to metabolomics in fermented foods, including targeted and untargeted metabolomics studies, the identification and characterization of bioactive compounds, the elucidation of metabolic pathways, and the evaluation of the impact of fermentation conditions on metabolite profiles. Additionally, studies investigating the effects of fermented foods on human health, such as their role in gut microbiota modulation, immune modulation, and disease prevention, are encouraged.

Researchers and scientists from various disciplines, including food science, nutrition, microbiology, and metabolomics, are invited to submit their original research articles, reviews, and methodological papers. By bringing together cutting-edge research in this field, this Special Issue aims to advance our understanding of the complex interactions between microbial communities, biochemical transformations, and metabolite profiles in fermented foods. Ultimately, the knowledge gained from these studies can contribute to the development of innovative strategies for optimizing fermentation processes, improving food quality, and harnessing the health benefits of fermented foods for human well-being.

Dr. Mutamed Ayyash
Dr. Senaka Ranadheera
Dr. Nan Zhao
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Fermentation is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • fermented foods
  • metabolomics
  • bioactive compounds
  • food quality
  • health benefits
  • microbial communities
  • metabolite profiling
  • fermentation conditions
  • gut microbiota
  • immune modulation
  • disease prevention
  • optimization
  • innovative strategies
  • human well-being
  • volatile metabolomics
  • fermented dairy products
  • fermented plant-based products
  • ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF-MS)
  • liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry LC-MS
  • nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)
  • chemometric tools

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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16 pages, 1262 KiB  
Article
Assessing the Impact of Commercial Lachancea thermotolerans Immobilized in Biocapsules on Wine Quality: Odor Active Compounds and Organoleptic Properties
by Raquel Muñoz-Castells, Juan Moreno, Teresa García-Martínez, Juan Carlos Mauricio and Jaime Moreno-García
Fermentation 2024, 10(6), 303; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation10060303 - 6 Jun 2024
Viewed by 401
Abstract
As a result of climate change, the phenology of grapes has been altered, mainly by increasing the sugar content and decreasing the acidity of ripe grapes. This shift, when the must is fermented, affects the quality of the wine. In this regard, the [...] Read more.
As a result of climate change, the phenology of grapes has been altered, mainly by increasing the sugar content and decreasing the acidity of ripe grapes. This shift, when the must is fermented, affects the quality of the wine. In this regard, the use of selected Saccharomyces and non-Saccharomyces yeasts to mitigate these undesirable effects in wine fermentations entails new strategies to improve their control and also to obtain wines better adapted to current consumer preferences. This work focuses on the use of a commercially available strain of Lachancea thermotolerans immobilized in biological support to form “microbial biocapsules”, comparing its effect with a free format and spontaneous fermentation on alcoholic fermentation and volatile compound composition. These biocapsules, consisting of yeast cells attached to fungal pellets, are being tested to improve wine sensory attributes and also to facilitate yeast inoculation in fermentative and clarification winemaking processes, as well as to reduce time and production costs. The composition of young wines obtained with L. thermotolerans, inoculated as free or biocapsule formats, were compared with those obtained by the traditional method of spontaneous fermentation using native yeast by quantifying 12 oenological variables and the contents in 12 major volatiles, 3 polyols, and 46 minor volatile compounds. The analytical data matrix underwent statistical analysis to compare and establish significant differences at p ≤ 0.05 level between the different wines obtained. Among the major volatiles and polyols, only ethyl acetate, 1,1-diethoxyethane, methanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, acetoin, ethyl lactate, and glycerol showed significant differences in L. thermotolerans wines. Also, from the minor volatile metabolites, eight showed a significant dependence on the format used for L. thermotolerans, and the other nine volatiles were dependent on both yeast and inoculation format. Only 27 volatiles were selected as aroma-active compounds with odor activity values higher than 0.2 units. Statistical analysis showed a clear separation of the obtained wines into groups when subjected to Principal Component Analysis, and the fingerprinting of wines made with biocapsules shows intermediate values between the two remaining inoculation formats, particularly in the fruity/ripe fruit, green, and floral series. The organoleptic evaluation of wines results in significantly higher values in taste, overall quality, and total score for wines obtained with biocapsules. Full article
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17 pages, 3591 KiB  
Article
Growth, Substrate, and Metabolite Changes of Probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis in Soy (Tofu) Whey
by Ricco Tindjau, Jian-Yong Chua and Shao-Quan Liu
Fermentation 2023, 9(12), 1024; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9121024 - 15 Dec 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1368
Abstract
Soy (tofu) whey is one of the two side-streams from tofu processing, which has been shown to be suitable for microbial growth. In this work, probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 and B94 were used to ferment soy whey with different supplements to explore [...] Read more.
Soy (tofu) whey is one of the two side-streams from tofu processing, which has been shown to be suitable for microbial growth. In this work, probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis Bl-04 and B94 were used to ferment soy whey with different supplements to explore the possibility of harnessing Bifidobacterium fermentation to upcycle soy whey. Soy whey was supplemented with different supplements (control, CN; glucose, G; glucose + cysteine, GC; glucose + cysteine + yeast extract, GCY) and inoculated with either B. lactis Bl-04 or B94. Growth, substrate utilization, and metabolic products were monitored before and after fermentation. Bl-04 managed to grow in all four media, while B94 needed cysteine to grow. The contents of sucrose, cysteine, methionine, and succinic acid decreased in the fermented samples. Acetic and lactic acids were produced in fermented soy whey ranging from 0.49–2.66 g/L and 0.58–2.88 g/L, respectively, with vitamin B12 at 2.06–4.56 μg/L. Increases in isoflavone aglycones (0.19–25.05 mg/L) and iron (0.03–0.12 mg/L) were observed. The PCA analysis of volatiles showed a distinct clustering due to short-chain fatty acids (acetic, butyric, and isovaleric acid), 2,3-butanedione (diacetyl), H2S, and 3-methylthiophene. Overall, the selection of suitable bifidobacterial strains and supplements for soy whey fermentation can open avenues to upcycle soy whey. Full article
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20 pages, 2027 KiB  
Article
Fermentation of Date Pulp Residues Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia kudriavzevii—Insights into Biological Activities, Phenolic and Volatile Compounds, Untargeted Metabolomics, and Carbohydrate Analysis Post In Vitro Digestion
by Nadia S. Alkalbani, Muneeba Zubair Alam, Anas Al-Nabulsi, Tareq M. Osaili, Amin Olaimat, Shao-Quan Liu, Afaf Kamal-Eldin and Mutamed Ayyash
Fermentation 2023, 9(6), 561; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9060561 - 12 Jun 2023
Viewed by 1608
Abstract
Utilizing agricultural byproducts, such as date pulp residue (DPR), can contribute significantly towards achieving sustainable food production. This paper aimed to investigate the physicochemical properties of DPR and evaluate the health benefits of nonfermented and fermented DPR samples both pre- and post-digestion (bioaccessible [...] Read more.
Utilizing agricultural byproducts, such as date pulp residue (DPR), can contribute significantly towards achieving sustainable food production. This paper aimed to investigate the physicochemical properties of DPR and evaluate the health benefits of nonfermented and fermented DPR samples both pre- and post-digestion (bioaccessible portions). Additionally, it aimed to analyze the carbohydrates and untargeted metabolites in the bioaccessible portions. Fermentation of DPR by Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia kudriavzevii resulted in an abundance of malic acid (over 2400 mg/100 g) and the identification of 42 volatiles, with different degrees of predominance observed in the samples. Twenty phenolics were determined by UPLC in fermented DPR, with (-)-epicatechin, tyrosol, and gallic acid being the most abundant. Bioaccessibility studies revealed that fermented DPR samples retained at least ~44% of α-glucosidase inhibition and exhibited improved α-amylase inhibition compared to nonfermented and undigested samples. In vitro cytotoxicity assays showed a more potent inhibitory effect of fermented DPR against MCF-7 and Caco2 cell lines (average inhibition of 55% and 74.4% for the two types of fermented samples) compared to nonfermented DPR. The untargeted metabolomics analysis identified C5-branched dibasic acid metabolism as the most prominent pathway, with four metabolites identified. Furthermore, the analysis of bioaccessible carbohydrate metabolites in the fermented DPR using LC-QTOF showed the presence of a group of phytochemicals, including three terpenoid metabolites. Full article
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Review

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13 pages, 989 KiB  
Review
Fermented Foods as a Potential Vehicle of Antimicrobial-Resistant Bacteria and Genes
by Poonam Gopika Vinayamohan, Leya Susan Viju, Divya Joseph and Kumar Venkitanarayanan
Fermentation 2023, 9(7), 688; https://doi.org/10.3390/fermentation9070688 - 22 Jul 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 3083
Abstract
Fermented food products are widely consumed for their nutritional and health-promoting properties, earning them a central place in diets around the globe. However, these foods can present a paradox, as they have the potential to harbor not only beneficial probiotics but also antibiotic-resistant [...] Read more.
Fermented food products are widely consumed for their nutritional and health-promoting properties, earning them a central place in diets around the globe. However, these foods can present a paradox, as they have the potential to harbor not only beneficial probiotics but also antibiotic-resistant (AR) microbes and genes. The impact of AR microbes and genes in fermented foods has far-reaching implications, such as potential effects on human health, repercussions in the food industry, and environmental consequences. An in-depth analysis of AR microbes and genes in fermented foods, including dairy products, fermented fruits and vegetables, meat products, and beverages, would provide insights into the extent and ramifications of the issue with these foods. Therefore, this review systematically presents the status of AR in fermented foods, with a particular focus on AR bacteria and genes within this category of food products. The review also highlights the complexities of AR in fermented foods, emphasizing the role of bacterial adaptation during the fermentation process and the dynamics of bacterial gene transfer. Various factors contributing to AR microbes and genes are brought into focus, including intrinsic resistance among bacteria in fermented foods and the potential risk of contamination with pathogenic bacteria. Moreover, this review presents a range of mitigation strategies, from the development of novel antimicrobials to advances in fermentation technology and regulatory control. This comprehensive perspective on the intricate interplay between AR and fermented food will potentially pave the way for more targeted research and mitigation strategies in this critical area. Full article
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