Special Issue "Wave and Tidal Energy 2020"

A special issue of Energies (ISSN 1996-1073). This special issue belongs to the section "Wind, Wave and Tidal Energy".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 October 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Rodrigo Carballo Sánchez
Website
Guest Editor
Hydraulic Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, EPSE, Campus Universitario s/n, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Interests: wave, tidal, and river energy: resource, performance, technology optimization, environmental impact; estuarine, and coastal hydrodynamics; sediment transport; integrated water resources management of marine and freshwater systems
Dr. Iván López Moreira
Website
Guest Editor
Hydraulic Engineering, University of Santiago de Compostela, EPSE, Campus Universitario s/n, 27002 Lugo, Spain
Interests: coastal engineering; marine renewable energy; wave energy; oscillating water column wave energy converters; physical modeling; numerical modeling; applied artificial intelligence

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Over the last few decades, marine renewable energy has emerged as one of the most powerful renewables with the potential to replace fossil fuel generation. Amongst the different marine energy resources, wave and tidal energy stand out because of their high-density, well-predictability, and low environmental impact. In addition, they present significant synergies with other marine renewables, as is the case for offshore wind energy, along with other coastal uses, thereby enhancing their economic viability. In this context, intensive research has led to the development of the wave and tidal industry, and, as a result, the exploitation of these forms of energy is approaching commercial viability.

This Special Issue deals with any research on the improvement of the understanding of wave and tidal energy exploitation. Topics of interest for publication include, but are not limited to the following:

  • Resource assessment;
  • Performance analysis;
  • Impact of farm operation;
  • Coastal protection;
  • Cost assessment;
  • Synergies with other renewables and coastal uses;
  • Array design;
  • Farm deployment planning and integrated coastal zone management;
  • Device optimization through numerical and physical modeling;
  • PTO design;
  • Grid connection;
  • Installation and maintenance;
  • Implications of climate change on energy exploitation

Dr. Rodrigo Carballo Sánchez
Dr. Iván López Moreira
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Energies is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • wave energy
  • tidal energy
  • performance
  • impact
  • coastal protection
  • economics
  • integrated coastal zone management
  • technologies
  • device optimization
  • numerical modeling
  • physical modeling
  • multiuse platforms
  • climate change

Published Papers (5 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Wave Power Assessment in the Middle Part of the Southern Coast of Java Island
Energies 2020, 13(10), 2633; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13102633 - 21 May 2020
Abstract
An assessment of the wave power at the southern coast of the middle part of Java Island (Indonesia) was conducted based on a 15-year hindcast spectral wave model using the MIKE 21 Spectral Wave software. The model was forced with wind data with [...] Read more.
An assessment of the wave power at the southern coast of the middle part of Java Island (Indonesia) was conducted based on a 15-year hindcast spectral wave model using the MIKE 21 Spectral Wave software. The model was forced with wind data with a 0.125° spatial interval and hourly time resolution. The obtained model was validated with field data collected from a buoy station that provided a set of significant wave height data with an hourly data interval for the whole month of June 2014. The validation showed that the obtained model matched the observed data with a minor average error. A spatial analysis was conducted in order to find the most suitable location for installing wave energy converters while taking into consideration the potential area demand, the wave power intensity, and the distance from the shore. Moreover, spatial analysis is conducted in order to find a suitable location to install wave energy converters, with consideration to potential area demand, wave power intensity, and distance from the shore. The best prospective location reached 30 kW/m of mean wave power intensity, 2.04 m of mean significant wave height, 8.9 s of mean wave period, 150 m of distance from the shoreline. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave and Tidal Energy 2020)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
On the Development of an Offshore Version of the CECO Wave Energy Converter
Energies 2020, 13(5), 1036; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13051036 - 26 Feb 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
Offshore locations present significant amounts of wave energy and free sea space, which could facilitate the deployment of larger numbers of wave energy converters (WECs) in comparison with nearshore regions. The present study aims to find a suitable design for an offshore floating [...] Read more.
Offshore locations present significant amounts of wave energy and free sea space, which could facilitate the deployment of larger numbers of wave energy converters (WECs) in comparison with nearshore regions. The present study aims to find a suitable design for an offshore floating version of CECO, a sloped motion WEC. For this purpose, a new design methodology is proposed in this paper for identifying and assessing possible floating configurations of CECO, which consists of four distinct set-ups obtained by varying the type of main supporting structure and the mooring system. Two options are based on spar designs and the other two on tension leg platform (TLP) designs. Based on outcomes of time-domain numerical calculations, the aforementioned configurations were assessed in terms of annual wave energy conversion and magnitude of mooring loads. Results indicate that a TLP configuration with an innovative mooring solution could increase the annual energy production by 40% with respect to the fixed version of CECO. Besides, the mooring system is found to be a key component, influencing the overall system performance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave and Tidal Energy 2020)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
The Economic Feasibility of Floating Offshore Wave Energy Farms in the North of Spain
Energies 2020, 13(4), 806; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13040806 - 12 Feb 2020
Abstract
A technique to analyse the economic viability of offshore farms composed of wave energy converters is proposed. Firstly, the inputs, whose value will be considered afterwards in the economic step, was calculated using geographic information software. Secondly, the energy produced by each wave [...] Read more.
A technique to analyse the economic viability of offshore farms composed of wave energy converters is proposed. Firstly, the inputs, whose value will be considered afterwards in the economic step, was calculated using geographic information software. Secondly, the energy produced by each wave converter was calculated. Then the economic factors were computed. Finally, the restriction that considers the depth of the region (bathymetry) was put together with the economic outputs, whose value depends on the floating Wave Energy Converter (WEC). The method proposed was applied to the Cantabric and Atlantic coasts in the north of Spain, a region with a good offshore wave energy resource. In addition, three representative WECs were studied: Pelamis, AquaBuoy and Wave Dragon; and five options for electric tariffs were analysed. Results show the Wave Energy Converter that has the best results regarding its LCOE (Levelized Cost of Energy), IRR (Internal Rate of Return) and NPV (Net Present Value), and which area is best for the development of a wave farm. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave and Tidal Energy 2020)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Spatio-Temporal Assessment of Climate Change Impact on Wave Energy Resources Using Various Time Dependent Criteria
Energies 2020, 13(3), 768; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13030768 - 10 Feb 2020
Abstract
The wave energy resources in the Indian Ocean can be considered as a potential alternative to fossil fuels. However, the wave energy resources are subject to short-term fluctuations and long-term changes due to climate change. Hence, considering sustainable development goals, it is necessary [...] Read more.
The wave energy resources in the Indian Ocean can be considered as a potential alternative to fossil fuels. However, the wave energy resources are subject to short-term fluctuations and long-term changes due to climate change. Hence, considering sustainable development goals, it is necessary to assess both short-term (intra-annual) variation and long-term change. For this purpose, the simulated wave characteristics were utilized, and the wave power and its variation and change were analyzed in the whole domain and nearshore areas. The short-term fluctuation was investigated in terms of monthly and seasonal variations and the future change was discussed based on absolute and relative changes. Both analyses show that the Southern Indian Ocean, despite experiencing extreme events and having higher wave energy potential, is more stable in terms of both short and long-term variation and change. The assessment of the total and exploitable storages of wave energy and their future change revealed the higher potential and higher stability of the nearshores of the Southern Indian Ocean. It can be concluded that based on various factors, the south of Sri Lanka, Horn of Africa, southeast Africa, south of Madagascar and Reunion and Mauritius islands are the most suitable areas for wave energy extraction. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave and Tidal Energy 2020)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Performance Assessment of a Hybrid Wave Energy Converter Integrated into a Harbor Breakwater
Energies 2020, 13(1), 236; https://doi.org/10.3390/en13010236 - 03 Jan 2020
Abstract
Seaports are highly energy demanding infrastructures and are exposed to wave energy, which is an abundant resource and largely unexploited. As a result, there has been a rising interest in integrating wave energy converters (WEC) into the breakwaters of seaports. The present work [...] Read more.
Seaports are highly energy demanding infrastructures and are exposed to wave energy, which is an abundant resource and largely unexploited. As a result, there has been a rising interest in integrating wave energy converters (WEC) into the breakwaters of seaports. The present work analyzes the performance of an innovative hybrid WEC module combining an oscillating water column (OWC) and an overtopping device (OWEC) integrated into a rubble mound breakwater, based on results of a physical model study carried out at a geometrical scale of 1:50. Before the experimental tests, the device’s performance was numerically optimized using ANSYS Fluent and WOPSim v3.11. The wave power captured by the hybrid WEC was calculated and the performance of the two harvesting principles discussed. It was demonstrated that hybridization could lead to systems with higher efficiencies than its individual components, for a broader range of wave conditions. The chosen concepts were found to complement each other: the OWEC was more efficient for the lower wave periods tested and the OWC for the higher. Consequently, the power production of the hybrid WEC was found to be less dependent on the wave’s characteristics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wave and Tidal Energy 2020)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop