Special Issue "Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation"

A special issue of Diversity (ISSN 1424-2818).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 1 October 2022 | Viewed by 12816

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Boris A. Levin
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Papanin Institute for Biology of Inland Waters, Russian Academy of Sciences, Leninskiy Prospekt, 14, Moscow, Russia
Interests: evolutionary biology of fishes; adaptive radiation; taxonomy, genetics
Dr. Yulia V. Bespalaya
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Laverov Federal Center for Integrated Arctic Research of the Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, 163000 Arkhangelsk, Russia
Interests: evolutionary biology of freshwater bivalves; invasive species; phylogeography

Special Issue Information

The diversity of life in aquatic systems is amazing. At the same time, our knowledge on aquatic biodiversity is still significantly insufficient concerning species diversity as well as evolutionary mechanisms of generation of this diversity. Aquatic ecosystems are rapidly degraded due to human activity. We consider biodiversity conservation one of the main challenges for humanity. Accelerated degradation of aquatic habitats may result in elimination of the substantial part of biodiversity before it is scientifically described and documented. Covering organisms from all kingdoms of life, we will accept review papers as well as primary research articles that include original data and high-quality analysis in morphology, ecology, and molecular genetics and genomics. This Special Issue aims to provide a basic resource for researchers interested in the systematic knowledge of aquatic biodiversity, its evolution, as well as conservation.

Dr. Boris A. Levin
Dr. Yulia V. Bespalaya
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • aquatic organisms
  • evolution
  • phylogeny
  • phylogeography
  • adaptations
  • taxonomy
  • biogeography
  • conservation

Published Papers (14 papers)

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Research

Article
Trophic Diversification Out of Ancestral Specialization: An Example from a Radiating African Cyprinid Fish (Genus Garra)
Diversity 2022, 14(8), 629; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14080629 - 06 Aug 2022
Viewed by 307
Abstract
Trophic resource partitioning is one of the main ecological mechanisms of adaptive radiation. The Garra is a highly specialized periphyton feeder that has widened jaws equipped with a horny cutting scraper. In a river located in the Ethiopian Highlands in East Africa, a [...] Read more.
Trophic resource partitioning is one of the main ecological mechanisms of adaptive radiation. The Garra is a highly specialized periphyton feeder that has widened jaws equipped with a horny cutting scraper. In a river located in the Ethiopian Highlands in East Africa, a diversification of Garra composed of six sympatric ecomorphs which were strikingly diverse in trophic morphology was revealed. A hypothesis on trophic resource partitioning was tested using data on diet composition, gut length, and stable isotopes. The obtained results confirmed the trophic diversification of Garra ecomorphs. Three feeding modes were revealed: (i) periphytonophagy, (ii) mixed periphytonophagy and zoophagy, and (iii) zoophagy. The periphyton feeders had a long gut and were enriched in δ13C values compared to the shorter gut and lowered δ13C values in the zoophagous ecomorphs. Therefore, Garra could respecialize out of its ancestral specialization. This finding does not support the generalists-to-specialists hypothesis on the origin of specializations, and suggests that Liem’s paradox is a more common phenomenon. In the case of specialists, we assume that new ecological opportunities can be ‘visible’ to specialists if they are preceded by relaxed selection constrains that lead to the widening of the ecological/morphological plasticity to jump out of a canalized mode of ancestral specialization. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Comparative Phylogeography of Phoxinus, Delminichthys, Phoxinellus and Telestes in Dinaric Karst: Which Factors Have Influenced Their Current Distributions?
Diversity 2022, 14(7), 526; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14070526 - 29 Jun 2022
Viewed by 393
Abstract
The waters of the Dinaric Karst drain into both the Adriatic and the Black Sea basins. Precipitation is high, yet surface waters are scarce, with the exception of sinking streams. Dinaric Karst is a biodiversity hotspot, with diverse speleo- and epigean freshwater fauna. [...] Read more.
The waters of the Dinaric Karst drain into both the Adriatic and the Black Sea basins. Precipitation is high, yet surface waters are scarce, with the exception of sinking streams. Dinaric Karst is a biodiversity hotspot, with diverse speleo- and epigean freshwater fauna. The distribution patterns of taxa in Dinaric Karst have arisen from a combination of vicariance and dispersal and their alteration over time. Within fishes, there are genera that include both species that are widespread and species with restricted ranges (e.g., Phoxinus, Telestes), and genera with only restricted distributions (e.g., Delminichthys, Phoxinellus). Some (Delminichthys, Phoxinellus and Dinaric Telestes) have a similar lifestyle, specialized for dwelling in sinking streams in karst poljes. The present study compares the distribution ranges of Phoxinus, Delminichthys, Phoxinellus and Telestes in Dinaric Karst based upon their mitochondrial genetic lineages, including dating of divergence times and reconstruction of ancestral geographic ranges. The biology of Phoxinus has played a major role in its wider distribution than the other three genera, which exhibit some limited ability to migrate underground, but which cannot disperse along main river courses due to their specific adaptation for dwelling in the sinking streams of karst poljes. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Diversity of Freshwater Calanoid Copepods (Crustacea: Copepoda: Calanoida) in Southern Vietnam with an Updated Checklist for the Country
Diversity 2022, 14(7), 523; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14070523 - 28 Jun 2022
Viewed by 506
Abstract
The diversity of freshwater calanoid copepods from different habitats in Vietnam is investigated based on our findings from a field expedition in 2012–2013 and literature reviews. We collected 160 samples from 87 sites, including lakes, ponds, roadside canals, rivers, and rice fields in [...] Read more.
The diversity of freshwater calanoid copepods from different habitats in Vietnam is investigated based on our findings from a field expedition in 2012–2013 and literature reviews. We collected 160 samples from 87 sites, including lakes, ponds, roadside canals, rivers, and rice fields in eight provinces of southern Vietnam. A total of 13 species belonging to eight genera and three families were recorded. Among these, four were recorded for the first time in Vietnam (Mongolodiaptomus malaindosinensis, Mongolodiaptomus mekongensis, Vietodiaptomus blachei, and Pseudodiaptomus siamensis). One unidentified taxon (Tropodiaptomus sp.) probably belongs to an undescribed species. Both Eodiaptomusdraconisignivomi and M. malaindosinensis were the most frequently encountered species (28.74% of the sampled sites), followed by Mongolodiaptomus botulifer (24.14%), while Neodiaptomus yangtsekiangensis, Tropodiaptomusoryzanus, and Tropodiaptomus sp. are rare species found in a single locality. To date, 40 calanoid species (33 in the family Diaptomidae) have been recorded from Vietnam, and an updated list is presented. Seven species are potentially endemic to Vietnam. At the same sampling dates, the species richness of the calanoids was a range of 1–5 species per locality. The results of the Canonical Correspondence Analysis showed that pH and conductivity tended to be positively related to the calanoid distribution. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Postglacial Expansion Routes and Mitochondrial Genetic Diversification of the Freshwater Pearl Mussel in Europe and North America
Diversity 2022, 14(6), 477; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14060477 - 13 Jun 2022
Viewed by 492
Abstract
The freshwater pearl mussel Margaritifera margaritifera is a unionid species distributed across Northwestern Russia, Fennoscandia, Western and Southwestern Europe, and the Atlantic Coast of North America. In this study, we reconstructed the post-glacial expansion routes of this species based on FST genetic distances [...] Read more.
The freshwater pearl mussel Margaritifera margaritifera is a unionid species distributed across Northwestern Russia, Fennoscandia, Western and Southwestern Europe, and the Atlantic Coast of North America. In this study, we reconstructed the post-glacial expansion routes of this species based on FST genetic distances and the fact that M. margaritifera distribution is directly connected with salmonid expansion. The freshwater-pearl-mussel populations from North America and Northeastern Europe were the closest groups, judging by FST distances, supporting the concept of the North Atlantic Salmo salar colonization of the Barents and White Sea basins. We also documented that unique haplotypes in the populations of the Baltic and White Sea basins may have originated in isolated glacial refugia in Eastern and Northeastern Europe. The Iberian clade was the most distant group of populations, which is consistent with the previously observed role of the Iberian Peninsula as a glacial refugium. The high genetic diversity in the populations of Northern and Eastern Karelia was facilitated by migrants utilizing complex periglacial hydrological networks and by admixture in the contact zone where the migration flows met. We confirm that this region should be considered as a major center of genetic diversity within the European part of the species’ range. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Nearctic Species in the Palearctic: Trans-Beringian Range, Phylogeny and Phylogeography of Pterostichus (Cryobius) mandibularoides (Coleoptera, Carabidae)
Diversity 2022, 14(6), 415; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14060415 - 24 May 2022
Viewed by 479
Abstract
Subgenus Cryobius is one of the most numerous among the megafauna of tundra soils, but studies on its species distribution, taxonomy, and ecology are lacking. Phylogeny and phylogeography reconstructions of insects with taxonomic complexity have become possible using an integrative approach. Here, we [...] Read more.
Subgenus Cryobius is one of the most numerous among the megafauna of tundra soils, but studies on its species distribution, taxonomy, and ecology are lacking. Phylogeny and phylogeography reconstructions of insects with taxonomic complexity have become possible using an integrative approach. Here, we report that specimens of Pterostichus (Cryobius) mandibularoides, described from North America, were detected in Eurasia. Thus, this species has a trans-Beringian range with high distributions in North America, as well as a disjunctive part of the range on the northeastern edge of Asia within Chukotka and Wrangel Island. Eight COI haplotypes with closed relationships (1–2 mutation steps) were detected within the whole range, and one 28S rRNA haplotype was detected for Eurasia. Bayesian phylogeny revealed that P. mandibularoides had the most recent common ancestor with sister species P. brevicornis and P. nivalis. Mean genetic distances of both markers were similar and higher between P. mandibularoides and both P. brevicornis and P. nivalis (>5% ± 1.0%) than between the latter species (<4% ± 1.0%). The obtained results change the previous view about brevicornis group stock differentiation within Cryobius in the Arctic and require a revision of the phylogeny and phylogeography of brevicornis group species and Cryobius altogether. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Past, Current and Future of Fish Diversity in the Alakol Lakes (Central Asia: Kazakhstan)
Diversity 2022, 14(1), 11; https://doi.org/10.3390/d14010011 - 26 Dec 2021
Viewed by 1051
Abstract
The aboriginal ichthyofauna of the Balkhash basin consists mainly of endemic fish species. By the end of the last century, indigenous fish species were driven out of Lake Balkhash and the Alakol Lakes remain the largest refuges of aboriginal fish fauna. Knowledge of [...] Read more.
The aboriginal ichthyofauna of the Balkhash basin consists mainly of endemic fish species. By the end of the last century, indigenous fish species were driven out of Lake Balkhash and the Alakol Lakes remain the largest refuges of aboriginal fish fauna. Knowledge of regularities of the modern distribution of the indigenous fishes is crucial for biodiversity conservation as well as restoring aquatic ecosystems. The modern diversity of fish species was investigated there in this study. Significant changes for the indigenous and some alien fish distributions were revealed in contrast with earlier known data. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) was used to study the relationships between habitat characteristics and species abundance. Water mineralization and maximal observed water temperatures were estimated as the main environmental variables in fish distribution at the local scale. Habitat change leads to fish fauna homogenization as a result of rare species extinction and alien penetration. Growing human population and poor water management make the future of the indigenous fishes unpredictable. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Triangulopteris lacunata gen. et sp. nov. (Centroplasthelida), a New Centrohelid Heliozoan from Soil
Diversity 2021, 13(12), 658; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13120658 - 11 Dec 2021
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 769
Abstract
A new genus and species of centrohelid heliozoans, Triangulopteris lacunata gen. et sp. nov. (Pterocystidae Cavalier-Smith and Heyden, 2007), from four geographically remote locations (the Crimean Peninsula, the Dnieper Lowland (the East European Plain), Franz Josef Land, and the Kolyma Lowland (North–Eastern Siberia) [...] Read more.
A new genus and species of centrohelid heliozoans, Triangulopteris lacunata gen. et sp. nov. (Pterocystidae Cavalier-Smith and Heyden, 2007), from four geographically remote locations (the Crimean Peninsula, the Dnieper Lowland (the East European Plain), Franz Josef Land, and the Kolyma Lowland (North–Eastern Siberia) was examined using light and electron microscopy. The novel centrohelid is characterized by round shape, 4.3–16.3 μm in diameter, covered with two types of scales: 1.06–4.54 μm long triangular spine scales and 1.22–2.05 μm oval plate scales. Studied centrohelid heliozoan possesses a unique spine scale morphology. The base of scales is represented by a horse hoof-shaped basal plate. The inner surface and lateral wings of spine scales have numerous radial ribs with two ‘pockets’ that are located on both sides of the spine shaft. These pockets are formed by the lateral wings and ends of the basal plate. The cyst formation and transition to a spicules-bearing stage were noted. Additionally, phylogenetic tree was constructed based on SSU rRNA sequences including the strain HF-25 from the permafrost of Kolyma Lowland. The resulting phylogeny recovered it within the clade Pterista, while forming a separate sister lineage to H2 clade, which only had included freshwater environmental sequences. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Emerging Ecotone and Microbial Community of a Sulfidic Spring in the Reka River near Škocjanske Jame, Slovenia
Diversity 2021, 13(12), 655; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13120655 - 09 Dec 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1011
Abstract
During long periods with no precipitation, a sulfidic spring (Smrdljivec) appears in the dry bed of the Reka River before sinking into the karst underground. The study characterizes the area’s geological setting, development of microbial communities and an ecotone, and impact on the [...] Read more.
During long periods with no precipitation, a sulfidic spring (Smrdljivec) appears in the dry bed of the Reka River before sinking into the karst underground. The study characterizes the area’s geological setting, development of microbial communities and an ecotone, and impact on the vulnerable karst ecosystem. Geological mapping of the area, stable isotopic analyses, field measurements, and physico-chemical and toxicity analyses were applied to elucidate the environmental conditions. The spring’s microbial diversity was assessed using cultivation methods, microscopy, and metagenomics. Sulfur compounds in the spring probably originate from coal layers in the vicinity. Metagenomic analyses revealed 175 distinct operational taxonomic units in spring water and biofilms. Proteobacteria predominated in developed biofilms, and a “core” microbiome was represented by methylotrophs, including Methylobacter, Methylomonas, and Methylotenera. Diatoms represented an important component of biofilm biomass. A combination of environmental factors and climatic conditions allows the formation and accessibility of emerging biodiversity hotspots and ecotones. Details of their dynamic nature, global impact, and distribution should be highlighted further and given more protection. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Studies on Algae from the Order Synurales (Chrysophyceae) in Northern Vietnam
Diversity 2021, 13(11), 602; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13110602 - 21 Nov 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 524
Abstract
The present paper focuses on the flora of synuralean algae from four northern provinces in Vietnam: Bac Kan, Hanoi, Ninh Binh, and Thanh Hoa. Fifty-five water bodies were studied, including territories within national parks Ba Be, Ba Vi, Cuc Phuong, Ben En, and [...] Read more.
The present paper focuses on the flora of synuralean algae from four northern provinces in Vietnam: Bac Kan, Hanoi, Ninh Binh, and Thanh Hoa. Fifty-five water bodies were studied, including territories within national parks Ba Be, Ba Vi, Cuc Phuong, Ben En, and Trang An Wetland—The World Cultural and Natural Heritage and Van Long Wetland Nature Reserve. Samples were obtained from natural lakes and wetlands, artificial reservoirs and ponds, and small temporary water bodies. Electron microscopy allowed for the discovery of 39 taxa, 37 of which belonged to the genus Mallomonas and two to the genus Synura. Six taxa of the genus Mallomonas and two taxa from the genus Synura were not identified to the lower rank. Five taxa are reported for the first time in Vietnam. The most diverse flora was observed in natural protected water bodies. Eutrophic and hypereutrophic water bodies, which were prevalent in the study area, had a reduced number of selected species. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
The Morphology, Ultrastructure and Molecular Phylogeny of a New Freshwater Heterolobose Amoeba Parafumarolamoeba stagnalis n. sp. (Vahlkampfiidae; Heterolobosea)
Diversity 2021, 13(9), 433; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13090433 - 08 Sep 2021
Viewed by 930
Abstract
Heterolobose amoebae are important members of marine, freshwater, and soil microbial communities, but their diversity remains under-explored. We studied the diversity of Vahlkampfiidae to improve our understanding of heterolobosean relationships and their representation in aquatic benthos. Using light and electron microscopy, and molecular [...] Read more.
Heterolobose amoebae are important members of marine, freshwater, and soil microbial communities, but their diversity remains under-explored. We studied the diversity of Vahlkampfiidae to improve our understanding of heterolobosean relationships and their representation in aquatic benthos. Using light and electron microscopy, and molecular phylogenies based on the SSU rRNA and ITS loci, we describe the fine morphology and evolutionary relationships of a new heterolobosean Parafumarolamoeba stagnalis n. sp. from a small pond in European Russia. Cells of P. stagnalis possess a clearly distinguishable anterior hyaline pseudopodium, eruptive movement, several thin and sometimes branched uroidal filaments, spherical cysts without pores and plugs, and mitochondria that have discoid cristae and are surrounded by cisternae of the endoplasmic reticulum. The genus Parafumarolamoeba has so far included a single species, Parafumarolamoeba alta from high-altitude soil in Tibet, which is morphologically distinct from P. stagnalis. Taxonomic description for a new Parafumarolamoeba species is therefore provided. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Bacterial Number and Genetic Diversity in a Permafrost Peatland (Western Siberia): Testing a Link with Organic Matter Quality and Elementary Composition of a Peat Soil Profile
Diversity 2021, 13(7), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070328 - 17 Jul 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 1306
Abstract
Permafrost peatlands, containing a sizable amount of soil organic carbon (OC), play a pivotal role in soil (peat) OC transformation into soluble and volatile forms and greatly contribute to overall natural CO2 and CH4 emissions to the atmosphere under ongoing permafrost [...] Read more.
Permafrost peatlands, containing a sizable amount of soil organic carbon (OC), play a pivotal role in soil (peat) OC transformation into soluble and volatile forms and greatly contribute to overall natural CO2 and CH4 emissions to the atmosphere under ongoing permafrost thaw and soil OC degradation. Peat microorganisms are largely responsible for the processing of this OC, yet coupled studies of chemical and bacterial parameters in permafrost peatlands are rather limited and geographically biased. Towards testing the possible impact of peat and peat pore water chemical composition on microbial population and diversity, here we present results of a preliminary study of the western Siberia permafrost peatland discontinuous permafrost zone. The quantitative evaluation of microorganisms and determination of microbial diversity along a 100 cm thick peat soil column, which included thawed and frozen peat and bottom mineral horizon, was performed by RT-PCR and 16S rRNA gene-based metagenomic analysis, respectively. Bacteria (mainly Proteobacteria, Acidobacteria, Actinobacteria) strongly dominated the microbial diversity (99% sequences), with a negligible proportion of archaea (0.3–0.5%). There was a systematic evolution of main taxa according to depth, with a maximum of 65% (Acidobacteria) encountered in the active layer, or permafrost boundary (50–60 cm). We also measured C, N, nutrients and ~50 major and trace elements in peat (19 samples) as well as its pore water and dispersed ice (10 samples), sampled over the same core, and we analyzed organic matter quality in six organic and one mineral horizon of this core. Using multiparametric statistics (PCA), we tested the links between the total microbial number and 16S rRNA diversity and chemical composition of both the solid and fluid phase harboring the microorganisms. Under climate warming and permafrost thaw, one can expect a downward movement of the layer of maximal genetic diversity following the active layer thickening. Given a one to two orders of magnitude higher microbial number in the upper (thawed) layers compared to bottom (frozen) layers, an additional 50 cm of peat thawing in western Siberia may sizably increase the total microbial population and biodiversity of active cells. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Reproduction of the Androgenetic Population of the Asian Corbicula Clam (Bivalvia: Cyrenidae) in the Northern Dvina River Basin, Russia
Diversity 2021, 13(7), 316; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070316 - 10 Jul 2021
Viewed by 874
Abstract
The Corbicula clam is one of the most successful invaders of aquatic ecosystems and has invaded all continents except Antarctica. The natural dispersion of Corbicula seems to be limited by low winter temperatures that fall below the lower lethal temperatures (0 to +2 [...] Read more.
The Corbicula clam is one of the most successful invaders of aquatic ecosystems and has invaded all continents except Antarctica. The natural dispersion of Corbicula seems to be limited by low winter temperatures that fall below the lower lethal temperatures (0 to +2 °C). However, Corbicula can be found in colder regions, taking refuge in waters heated by thermal power plants. The purpose of this investigation was to study the gonadal histology, reproductive cycle, and the seasonal changes of shell size structure of the Corbicula clam populations in the warm water discharge of the Arkhangelsk thermal power plant (Northwest Russia). Samples were collected monthly from January 2017 to December 2018 and processed using traditional histological and morphological techniques. The number of reproductive periods varied from year to year. It was established that the Corbicula clam has a continuous reproduction period which may be adaptive in unstable environmental conditions. This reproductive strategy is probably aimed at increasing the reproductive success of the population. Our data expand the understanding of reproductive features of the Corbicula clam in harsh environmental conditions. These results could be applied to control, monitoring, and management measures. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Genetic Investigation of Aral Wild Common Carp Populations (Cyprinus carpio) Using ddRAD Sequencing
Diversity 2021, 13(7), 295; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13070295 - 28 Jun 2021
Viewed by 1158
Abstract
Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is a widespread freshwater fish species of the Cyprinidae family, one of the largest and most diverse fish families. The natural habitats of C. carpio extend from Western Europe to South-East Asia. Common carp has remained an [...] Read more.
Common carp (Cyprinus carpio) is a widespread freshwater fish species of the Cyprinidae family, one of the largest and most diverse fish families. The natural habitats of C. carpio extend from Western Europe to South-East Asia. Common carp has remained an economically important fish species in aquaculture for many centuries and its production nowadays exceeds 4 million tons worldwide and continues to grow. The taxonomy of C. carpio is complicated, since this species is usually distinguished in two, three, and even four distinct subspecies. In the present study, we used ddRAD-sequencing to genotype 30 specimens from five wild common carp populations from the Ponto-Caspian, Balkhash-Ile, and Aral Sea geographical regions. It is demonstrated that they differ at the population level according to F-statistics analysis. At the same time, the subspecies status of C. carpio aralensis has not yet been confirmed. We found several loci that can be used as a discriminant for Aral and Ponto-Caspian wild common carp populations. It is suggested that Aral carp (C. carpio aralensis), which inhabits Balkhash-Ile and Aral Sea basins, is related to Ponto-Caspian or European carp (C. carpio carpio). Moreover, Aral carp might be the ancestor for European carp subspecies. Our results can be used to develop population-specific, high-density SNP marker panels, allowing the trade control of common carp production in the Eurasian Economic Union. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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Article
Assessment of Water Quality, Eutrophication, and Zooplankton Community in Lake Burullus, Egypt
Diversity 2021, 13(6), 268; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13060268 - 15 Jun 2021
Cited by 21 | Viewed by 1287
Abstract
Burullus Lake is Egypt’s second most important coastal lagoon. The present study aimed to shed light on the different types of polluted waters entering the lake from various drains, as well as to evaluate the zooplankton community, determine the physical and chemical characteristics [...] Read more.
Burullus Lake is Egypt’s second most important coastal lagoon. The present study aimed to shed light on the different types of polluted waters entering the lake from various drains, as well as to evaluate the zooplankton community, determine the physical and chemical characteristics of the waters, and study the eutrophication state based on three years of seasonal monitoring from 2017 to 2019 at 12 stations. The results revealed that Rotifera, Copepoda, Protozoa, and Cladocera dominated the zooplankton population across the three-year study period, with a total of 98 taxa from 59 genera and 10 groups detected in the whole-body lake in 2018 and 2019, compared to 93 species from 52 genera in 2017. Twelve representative surface water samples were collected from the lake to determine physicochemical parameters, i.e., temperature, pH, salinity, dissolved oxygen, biological oxygen demand, chemical oxygen demand, ammonia-N, nitrate–N, nitrate-N, total nitrogen, total phosphorus, dissolved reactive phosphorus, and chlorophyll-a, as well as Fe, Cu, Zn, Cr, Ni, Cd, and Pb ions. Based on the calculations of the water quality index (WQI), the lake was classified as having good water quality. However, the trophic state is ranked as hyper-eutrophic and high trophic conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Aquatic Biodiversity: Evolution, Taxonomy and Conservation)
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