Special Issue "Oral Health: Economic and Psychological–Behavioral Implications"

A special issue of Medicina (ISSN 1010-660X).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 31 December 2020.

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Luca Fiorillo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences, Morphological and Functional Images, University of Messina, Policlinico G. Martino, Via Consolare Valeria, 98100 Me, Italy
2. Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Dental Specialties, Second University of Naples, Naples, Italy
Interests: Oral Biology; Odontogenesis; Periodontitis; Oral Biofilm; Wound Healing; Biomaterials; Biocompatibility; Titanium Surface; Enamel; Tissue Regeneration
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Gabriele Cervino
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences, Morphological and Functional Images, University of Messina, Policlinico G. Martino, Via Consolare Valeria, 98100 Me, Italy
Interests: biomaterials; oral surgery; implantology; oral pathology; prosthodontics
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Rosa De Stefano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences, Morphological and Functional Images, University of Messina, Policlinico G. Martino, Via Consolare Valeria, 98100 Me, Italy
Interests: Rehabilitation; Quality of Life; Psychology; Neuropsychology; Interdisciplinary Medicine

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Oral health is at the heart of organisms’ systemic health. Nowadays, there is an increasing tendency to give importance to oral alterations, oral pathologies, and all the systemic implications that these may entail. Often, the psychological health of a dental patient is underestimated, as well as the behavior relating to oral conditions that derives from it. Quality of life improves with improved oral health according to some epidemiological tests, such as oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). Oral health and oral aesthetics are part of the aesthetics of a patient's face and a patient’s relationship with others. Another important aspect to consider is that of the costs related to oral treatments, therapies, and rehabilitations—costs that often make these types of treatments prohibitive, especially in some countries. The purpose of this Special Issue is to gather research on economic implications on oral health, such as the differences that exist between countries or patients of varying socio-economic statuses with respect to oral health conditions; the psychological and behavioral implications of patients depending on their oral health and aesthetic conditions; and the results that some treatments may have on the aforementioned issues and which types of rehabilitation should be considered or selected

Dr. Luca Fiorillo
Dr. Gabriele Cervino
Dr. Rosa De Stefano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Medicina is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • oral health
  • oral health-related quality of life
  • socio-economic conditions
  • behavioral science
  • psychological instruments
  • psychologic condition
  • drug abuse
  • lifestyle
  • epidemiology
  • interdisciplinary medicine
  • multidisciplinary medicine
  • oral rehabilitation
  • dental patients
  • medicine costs
  • aesthetics
  • digital dentistry
  • orthodontic treatments
  • oral surgery
  • prosthodontics
  • dental costs
  • dental materials
  • pediatric dentistry
  • developing countries

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research

Open AccessEditorial
Psychological Factors in Dental Patient Care: Odontophobia
Medicina 2019, 55(10), 678; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55100678 - 08 Oct 2019
Abstract
Dentistry and oral health are at the heart of the systemic health of humans. Often this branch of medicine is underestimated either due to socioeconomic reasons or due to fear. In fact, in dentistry, there is often a widespread condition of odontophobia among [...] Read more.
Dentistry and oral health are at the heart of the systemic health of humans. Often this branch of medicine is underestimated either due to socioeconomic reasons or due to fear. In fact, in dentistry, there is often a widespread condition of odontophobia among patients. A clinician’s knowledge of this condition, and an accompanying understanding of how to successfully manage it, is surely one of the first steps to gaining a patient’s trust and maintaining his or her patronage. Being able to manage a dental phobic patient in the best way is the key to successful therapy. Psychological techniques often have to work alongside dentistry in managing these patients. A future perspective concerns precisely the implementation of non-invasive practices such as hypnosis in the management of the latter. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health: Economic and Psychological–Behavioral Implications)
Open AccessEditorial
Oral Health: The First Step to Well-Being
Medicina 2019, 55(10), 676; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55100676 - 07 Oct 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Scientific research in the medical field shows this constantly: health starts from the mouth. Having good oral health nowadays is not only aimed at tooth health, but as amply demonstrated in the literature, it is a starting point for the general health and [...] Read more.
Scientific research in the medical field shows this constantly: health starts from the mouth. Having good oral health nowadays is not only aimed at tooth health, but as amply demonstrated in the literature, it is a starting point for the general health and well-being of our body. Retracing the latest scientific findings that demonstrate an interpolation between oral health, oral diseases, and systemic complications, literature support was brought to this manuscript. Oral health, as demonstrated, has potentially multi-organ systemic implications, and as the results of the recent literature demonstrate, these implications range from an insulin resistance, due to a periodontal disease, up to far more complex multi-organ systemic complications involving the cardiovascular system or even neurodegenerative pathology. Therefore, being able to improve oral health could have great systemic implications for the organism, for the prevention of pathologies, and therefore for society and for the quality of life in individuals. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health: Economic and Psychological–Behavioral Implications)

Research

Jump to: Editorial

Open AccessArticle
Effect of Hydrothermal Aging and Beverages on Color Stability of Lithium Disilicate and Zirconia Based Ceramics
Medicina 2019, 55(11), 749; https://doi.org/10.3390/medicina55110749 - 19 Nov 2019
Abstract
Background and Objectives: All-ceramic prosthesis is widely used in modern dental practice because of its improved physico-mechanical and optical properties. These restorations are exposed to coloring agents from various nutrition and beverages in the oral cavity. Long-term color stability is critical for [...] Read more.
Background and Objectives: All-ceramic prosthesis is widely used in modern dental practice because of its improved physico-mechanical and optical properties. These restorations are exposed to coloring agents from various nutrition and beverages in the oral cavity. Long-term color stability is critical for the success of these restorative materials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to assess the effect of common beverages and mouthwash on the color stability of lithium disilicate (LD), monolithic zirconia (MZ) and bilayer zirconia (BZ) surfaces. Materials and Method: Thirty disc-shaped specimens from each material were fabricated; each group was subdivided (n = 10) according to coffee, green tea and chlorhexidine immersion solutions. The baseline color of ceramic discs was recorded according to the CIE L*a*b* system with a portable spectrophotometer. The second measurement was recorded after 3000 thermocycling and immersion in coloring agents for 7 days. The mean color difference was calculated and data were compared with Kruskal-Wallis and Mann-Whitney post hoc tests (0.05). Results: ΔE values for LD with the immersion of coffee, tea, and Chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) were 1.78, 2.241 and 1.58, respectively. Corresponding ΔE values for MZ were 5.60, 5.19, and 4.86; marginally higher than the clinically acceptable level of 3.5. Meanwhile, BZ showed better color stability compared to MZ with ΔE values of 4.22, 2.11 and 1.43. Conclusions: Among the ceramics evaluated, LD ceramic was found to be more color stable, while MZ ceramics displayed a higher susceptibility to discoloration. MZ and BZ ceramic colors were significantly altered with coffee immersion, while LD ceramics were more affected by green tea. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Oral Health: Economic and Psychological–Behavioral Implications)
Back to TopTop