Special Issue "Bioengineering Tools Applied to Medical and Surgical Sciences"

A special issue of Applied Sciences (ISSN 2076-3417). This special issue belongs to the section "Applied Dentistry".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 September 2021.

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Cervino
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences and Morphological and Functional Imaging, Messina University,98100 Messina, Italy
Interests: biomaterials; oral surgery; implantology; oral pathology; prosthodontics; bioengineering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. Alberto Bianchi
Website
Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery and Medical-Surgery Specialities, University of Catania, 95100 Catania CT, Italy
Interests: oral surgery; maxillofacial surgery; rehabilitation; biomaterials
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Salvatore Crimi

Guest Editor
Department of General Surgery and Medical-Surgery Specialities, University of Catania, 95100 Catania CT, Italy
Interests: oral surgery; maxillofacial surgery; rehabilitation; biomaterials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

It is well known that bioengineering today represents a new step for researchers and clinicians who aim to have less invasive surgery as well as safe biomaterial applied to surgery or regenerative medicine. Recently, new tools, digital devices, 3D models and bioengineering interfaces signaled a step forward in the development of new strategies in patients’ treatment and health. Although much research has offered promising clinical results, the international literature is still focused on creating materials and new medical devices able to offer predictable and long-term clinical success to patients involved in surgical procedures. In this Special Issue, we aim to provide a global overview of the advances in bioengineering tools and devices applied to medical and clinical practice, underlining aspects of all innovative solutions. This Issue will also cover new advances in 3D planning treatment and medical 3D surgical software for tissue regeneration.

On behalf of Applied Sciences, you are cordially invited to contribute an article to the Special Issue “Bioengineering Tools Applied to Medical and Surgical Sciences”.

Prof. Dr. Gabriele Cervino
Prof. Dr. Alberto Bianchi
Dr. Salvatore Crimi
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Applied Sciences is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • bioengineering
  • biomaterial
  • tissue graft
  • 3D model
  • 3D printing

Published Papers (3 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Angled Screwdriver Solutions and Low-Profile Attachments in Full Arch Rehabilitation with Divergent Implants
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 1122; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11031122 - 26 Jan 2021
Abstract
Edentulism is one of the most significant problems given the increase in the elderly population. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate a case report with angled screwdriver solutions and new kinds of low-profile attachments in full arch rehabilitation with divergent [...] Read more.
Edentulism is one of the most significant problems given the increase in the elderly population. The aim of the present investigation is to evaluate a case report with angled screwdriver solutions and new kinds of low-profile attachments in full arch rehabilitation with divergent implants. In this clinical case we will analyze how low-profile abutments with angled screwdriver channel in the OT Bridge system (Rhein83, Bologna, Italy) can be a predictable solution over time to create a fixed prosthesis on disparallel implants with a digital structure (New Ancorvis, Bologna, Italy) for the satisfaction of the patient and of the work team. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioengineering Tools Applied to Medical and Surgical Sciences)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
Virtual Surgical Planning and the “In-House” Rapid Prototyping Technique in Maxillofacial Surgery: The Current Situation and Future Perspectives
Appl. Sci. 2021, 11(3), 1009; https://doi.org/10.3390/app11031009 - 23 Jan 2021
Abstract
Background: The first applications of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in maxillofacial surgery date back to the 1980s. Since then, virtual surgical planning (VSP) has undergone significant development and is now routinely used in daily practice. Indeed, in an extraordinary period, such as that [...] Read more.
Background: The first applications of computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing (CAD/CAM) in maxillofacial surgery date back to the 1980s. Since then, virtual surgical planning (VSP) has undergone significant development and is now routinely used in daily practice. Indeed, in an extraordinary period, such as that of the current COVID-19 pandemic, it offers a valuable tool in relation to the protection of healthcare workers. In this paper we provide a comprehensive summary of the clinical applications reported in the literature and review our experience using an in-house rapid prototyping technique in the field of maxillofacial surgery. methods: Our research was focused on reconstructive surgery, traumatology (especially in relation to orbital floor and zygomatic arch fractures), and COVID-19 masks. The first step was a radiographic study. Next, computed tomography (CT) scans were segmented in order to obtain a three-dimensional (3D) model. Finally, in the editing phase, through the use of specific software, a customized device for each patient was designed and printed. results: Four reconstructive procedures were performed with a perfect fitting of the surgical device produced by means of VSP. In nine orbital floor fracture cases a good overlapping of the mesh on the orbital floor was obtained. In sixteen zygomatic arch cases the post-operative CT scan showed an excellent fitting of the device and a correct fracture reduction. Regarding the COVID-19 period, six masks and shields produced proved to provide effective protection. conclusions: The timescale and costs required for the production of our “home-made” virtual design are low, which makes this method applicable to a large number of cases, for both ordinary and extraordinary activities. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioengineering Tools Applied to Medical and Surgical Sciences)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Open AccessArticle
An Easy and Effective Technique for Silicone Facial Implant Insertion and Fixation to Periosteum
Appl. Sci. 2020, 10(18), 6508; https://doi.org/10.3390/app10186508 - 18 Sep 2020
Abstract
In this paper, we present a simple way to place the implant into a harvested pocket and to subsequently fix it percutaneously. Eighteen patients (1 male, 13 females, 4 transgender), underwent facial implant placement; a total of 31 implants were placed (1 pair [...] Read more.
In this paper, we present a simple way to place the implant into a harvested pocket and to subsequently fix it percutaneously. Eighteen patients (1 male, 13 females, 4 transgender), underwent facial implant placement; a total of 31 implants were placed (1 pair of angles of the mandible implants, 12 pairs of malar/sub-malar implants, and 5 chin implants). The intraoral approach was performed on 15 patients, and on the remaining three patients, the sub-ciliary lower lid approach was preferred. Patients were followed up for at least one year with a maximum follow-up of seven years (mean 1.8 years). In all the cases, except one, patients healed without complications. One case of implant displacement and infection was recorded. No other complication was documented. The technique described is similar to the one suggested by Peled, although some useful tips were added, namely the use of sutures, not only to fix the implant but also to drive it into the harvested pocket. In addition, larger absorbable “left in place” sutures were used, avoiding accidental implant dislocation during their removal. Further studies are required to gain a more complete understanding of the effectiveness and reproducibility of this surgical technique. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Bioengineering Tools Applied to Medical and Surgical Sciences)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop