Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis

A special issue of Prosthesis (ISSN 2673-1592).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2022) | Viewed by 43732

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences, Morphological and Functional Images, School of Dentistry, University of Messina, Policlinico G. Martino, Via Consolare Valeria, 98100 Messina, Italy
Interests: oral surgery; prosthodontics; parametrical analysis; biomechanics; biomaterials; biotechnologies
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Engineering, University of Palermo, 90128 Palermo, Italy
Interests: biomechanics; medical devices; computer simulation; cardiovascular; valve prosthesis
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

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Guest Editor
Department of Health Science and Technology, Aalborg University, 9220 Aalborg, Denmark
Interests: neuroplasticity in rehabilitation of non-communicable diseases such as stroke; neuroplasticity and neuromodulation for alleviation of pain, in particular phantom limb pain; sensory feedback and sensory modulation; animal models (pig and rat) of pain; electrophysiology and neural signal processing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This Special Issue aims to collect high-quality review papers in the relevant prosthesis research fields. We encourage researchers from various fields within the journal’s scope (https://www.mdpi.com/journal/prosthesis/about) to contribute review papers that highlight the latest developments in their research field, or to invite relevant experts and colleagues to do so. The topics of this Special Issue include, but are not limited to, the following:

limb prosthesis; joint prosthesis; valve prosthesis; maxillofacial prosthesis; prosthodontics; prostheses applied in other body parts; control of prosthesis; prosthesis implantation; prosthetic infection; prosthetic materials; design and manufacturing of prosthesis.

The review papers that are submitted should provide syntheses of ideas, and have the potential to challenge existing paradigms and create new frameworks that will advance our understanding of all aspects of prosthesis.

Review manuscripts should comprise the front matter, literature review sections, and the back matter. You may use the template file to prepare the front and back matter of your review manuscript; it is not necessary to follow the remaining structure. Structured reviews and meta-analyses should use the same structure as research articles, and ensure that they conform to the PRISMA guidelines.

We welcome you to send short proposals for feature paper submissions to the Editorial Office ([email protected]) before the formal submission of your manuscript. Selected planned papers can be published in full open access form, Free-of-Charge, if they are accepted after a blind peer-review.

Prof. Dr. Marco Cicciù
Prof. Dr. Salvatore Pasta
Prof. Dr. Winnie Jensen
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Prosthesis is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (8 papers)

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Review

15 pages, 1438 KiB  
Review
Facial Scanners in Dentistry: An Overview
by Jason D. Lee, Olivia Nguyen, Yu-Chun Lin, Dianne Luu, Susie Kim, Ashley Amini and Sang J. Lee
Prosthesis 2022, 4(4), 664-678; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis4040053 - 15 Nov 2022
Cited by 14 | Viewed by 8270
Abstract
Purpose: This narrative review aims to explore the current status of facial scanning technology in the dental field; outlining the history, mechanisms, and current evidence regarding its use and limitations within digital dentistry. Methods: Subtopics within facial scanner technology in dentistry were identified [...] Read more.
Purpose: This narrative review aims to explore the current status of facial scanning technology in the dental field; outlining the history, mechanisms, and current evidence regarding its use and limitations within digital dentistry. Methods: Subtopics within facial scanner technology in dentistry were identified and divided among four reviewers. Electronic searches of the Medline (PubMed) database were performed with the following search terms: facial scanner, dentistry, prosthodontics, virtual patient, sleep apnea, maxillofacial prosthetics, accuracy. For this review only studies or review papers evaluating facial scanning technology for dental or medical applications were included. A total of 44 articles were included. Due to the narrative nature of this review, no formal evidence-based quality assessment was performed and the search was limited to the English language. No further restrictions were applied. Results: The significance, applications, limitations, and future directions of facial scanning technology were reviewed. Specific subtopics include significant history of facial scanner use and development for dentistry, different types and mechanisms used in facial scanning technology, accuracy of scanning technology, use as a diagnostic tool, use in creating a virtual patient, virtual articulation, smile design, diagnosing and treating obstructive sleep apnea, limitations of scanning technology, and future directions with artificial intelligence. Conclusions: Despite limitations in scan quality and software operation, 3D facial scanners are rapid and non-invasive tools that can be utilized in multiple facets of dental care. Facial scanners can serve an invaluable role in the digital workflow by capturing facial records to facilitate interdisciplinary communication, virtual articulation, smile design, and obstructive sleep apnea diagnosis and treatment. Looking into the future, facial scanning technology has promising applications in the fields of craniofacial research, and prosthodontic diagnosis and treatment planning. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis)
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10 pages, 726 KiB  
Review
The Conometric Connection for the Implant-Supported Fixed Prosthesis: A Narrative Review
by Saturnino Marco Lupi, Claudia Todaro, Dario De Martis, Paola Blasi, Ruggero Rodriguez y Baena and Stefano Storelli
Prosthesis 2022, 4(3), 458-467; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis4030037 - 16 Aug 2022
Cited by 5 | Viewed by 2567
Abstract
Aim: The conometric concept was proposed as a possible connection between the abutment and the prosthetic coping. This research aimed to review the features and possible clinical uses of this connection in an implant-supported fixed prosthesis. Methods: An electronic search was conducted on [...] Read more.
Aim: The conometric concept was proposed as a possible connection between the abutment and the prosthetic coping. This research aimed to review the features and possible clinical uses of this connection in an implant-supported fixed prosthesis. Methods: An electronic search was conducted on an online database for the topic in object; articles published in international literature were considered and the research gave 17 results, and 6 parameters were analyzed. Results: This connection eliminated the possibility of cement residues in the subgingival region, reducing the risk of inflammation of peri-implant soft and hard tissues; not having to remove the cement residues, it is possible to place the margins in more apical portions, improving the aesthetics outcomes of the rehabilitations. It is also known that the retention by means of a screw causes a weakening of the restoration. The retentive force is adequate for fixed rehabilitation even after a high number of insertion–disengagement cycles; in vitro studies have also shown a high bacterial sealing. Implant rehabilitation using preformed components, such as conometric hoods, is helpful for CAD/CAM, so a digital workflow is possible. Several types of prosthesis were presented, all of which demonstrated adequate clinical performance in the follow-up observation. Conclusions: This type of connection seems to be suitable to support fixed implant rehabilitations, but long-term clinical studies are needed to validate this system. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis)
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15 pages, 3642 KiB  
Review
A Review on Risk Management of Coronavirus Disease 19 (COVID-19) Infection in Dental Practice: Focus on Prosthodontics and All-Ceramic Materials
by Roberto Sorrentino, Michele Basilicata, Gennaro Ruggiero, Maria Irene Di Mauro, Renato Leone, Patrizio Bollero and Fernando Zarone
Prosthesis 2022, 4(3), 338-352; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis4030028 - 5 Jul 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 2233
Abstract
Background: A novel β-coronavirus infection (COVID-19) was first detected in Wuhan city, spreading rapidly to other countries and leading to a pandemic. Dental professionals and patients are exposed to a high risk of COVID-19 infection, particularly in the prosthodontic practice, because of the [...] Read more.
Background: A novel β-coronavirus infection (COVID-19) was first detected in Wuhan city, spreading rapidly to other countries and leading to a pandemic. Dental professionals and patients are exposed to a high risk of COVID-19 infection, particularly in the prosthodontic practice, because of the bio-aerosol produced during teeth preparation with dental handpieces and the strict contact with oral fluids during impression making. This paper aimed to provide an overview to limit the risk of transmission of COVID-19 infections during prosthetic procedures in dental offices. Methods: An electronic search was conducted on the electronic databases of PubMed/Medline, Google Scholar, Embase, Scopus, Dynamed, and Open Grey with the following queries: (COVID-19) AND/OR (SARS-CoV-2) AND/OR (Coronavirus) AND/OR (contaminated surface) AND/OR (cross-infection) AND/OR (Prosthodontics) AND/OR (dental ceramic) AND/OR (glass-ceramic). A manual search was performed as well. Results: From the 1023 collected records, 32 papers were included. Conclusions: Dental offices are at high risk of spreading SARS-CoV-2 infection due to the close contact with patients and continuous exposure to saliva during dental procedures. Therefore, pre-check triages via telephone, decontamination, the disinfection of impressions, the sterilization of scanner tips, and the use of specific personal protective equipment, dental high-speed handpieces with dedicated anti-retraction valves, and effective mouthwashes are strongly recommended. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis)
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10 pages, 410 KiB  
Review
Prosthodontic Treatment in Patients with Temporomandibular Disorders and Orofacial Pain and/or Bruxism: A Review of the Literature
by Giuseppe Minervini, Luca Fiorillo, Diana Russo, Alessandro Lanza, Cesare D’Amico, Gabriele Cervino, Aida Meto and Fabrizio Di Francesco
Prosthesis 2022, 4(2), 253-262; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis4020025 - 7 Jun 2022
Cited by 43 | Viewed by 5967
Abstract
Temporomandibular disorders are a group of conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints, the jaw muscles, and related structures. Patients with temporomandibular signs and/or symptoms frequently present with indications for prosthetic treatment. The management of these patients aims to achieve patient comfort, occlusal stability, and [...] Read more.
Temporomandibular disorders are a group of conditions affecting the temporomandibular joints, the jaw muscles, and related structures. Patients with temporomandibular signs and/or symptoms frequently present with indications for prosthetic treatment. The management of these patients aims to achieve patient comfort, occlusal stability, and the complex restoration of the teeth. The goal of this review is to provide an overview of the relationship between prosthodontics and temporomandibular disorders and/or bruxism with a focus on the cause-and-effect implications and the strategies for planning prosthetic treatments in patients with temporomandibular disorders and/or bruxism. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis)
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18 pages, 2001 KiB  
Review
Removable Partial Denture Frameworks in the Age of Digital Dentistry: A Review of the Literature
by Mohammed A. Akl and Charles G. Stendahl
Prosthesis 2022, 4(2), 184-201; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis4020019 - 20 Apr 2022
Cited by 10 | Viewed by 12660
Abstract
Alloys of cobalt chromium have been used for decades to create frameworks for removable partial dentures. While cobalt chromium has multiple advantages, such as strength and light weight, the casting process is laborious and requires special care to ensure that human error is [...] Read more.
Alloys of cobalt chromium have been used for decades to create frameworks for removable partial dentures. While cobalt chromium has multiple advantages, such as strength and light weight, the casting process is laborious and requires special care to ensure that human error is minimized. Furthermore, the display of metal clasps in these frameworks may be considered a limitation at times, especially with esthetically demanding patients. The introduction of digital technology to manufacturing in dentistry has brought forward new methods of fabricating cobalt chromium frameworks, some of which eliminate the casting process. Moreover, the development of high-performance polymers for use as removable partial denture frameworks brings multiple advantages, but raises concerns over design guidelines and principles. This review examines alternatives to conventionally cast frameworks so that clinicians may make evidence-based decisions when choosing framework materials and fabrication methods in the rapidly advancing world of digital dentistry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis)
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15 pages, 7565 KiB  
Review
CAD/CAM Diagnostic Esthetic Functional Splint (DEFS) as a Removable Prototype to Evaluate the Final Prosthetic Rehabilitation: A Narrative Review
by Fernando Zarone, Roberto Sorrentino, Francesca Sorrentino, Maria Irene Di Mauro and Daniel Edelhoff
Prosthesis 2022, 4(1), 136-150; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis4010014 - 16 Mar 2022
Viewed by 3921
Abstract
The main objective of this narrative review was to provide an overview of DEFS (Diagnostic Esthetic Functional Splint), namely CAD/CAM manufactured, “snap-retained”, tooth-colored splints available by materials exhibiting a certain degree of elasticity (like polycarbonates or acetal resins) for restoring function, esthetics and [...] Read more.
The main objective of this narrative review was to provide an overview of DEFS (Diagnostic Esthetic Functional Splint), namely CAD/CAM manufactured, “snap-retained”, tooth-colored splints available by materials exhibiting a certain degree of elasticity (like polycarbonates or acetal resins) for restoring function, esthetics and occlusion in several clinical situations, before or as an intermediate alternative to undergoing the final treatment. The search strategy included all papers dealing with snap-retained prosthetic systems and was based on a literature review of papers available in electronic databases (Pubmed/Medline, Evidence-Based Dentistry, BMJ Evidence-Based Medicine, Dynamed, Embase, BMJ Clinical Evidence, Web of Science, Scientific reports); eligible papers were researched on Opengreyand a manual search was performed, as well. From the electronic databases emerged 13,199 records, many of which were duplicates. The grey literature and the manual research did not produce any eligible article. After duplicates removal, 7690 records were obtained. Titles, abstracts and keywords were analyzed. The studies concerning the topic of interest were examined by the reviewers and discussed. Although no evidence-based data were found in the literature, according to the authors’ clinical experience, the DEFS (Diagnostic Esthetic Functional Splint) is a very promising solution in multiple clinical situations, due to its diagnostic, therapeutical, functional and esthetic versatility. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis)
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11 pages, 284 KiB  
Review
On the Modeling of Transcatheter Therapies for the Aortic and Mitral Valves: A Review
by Chiara Catalano and Salvatore Pasta
Prosthesis 2022, 4(1), 102-112; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis4010011 - 7 Mar 2022
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 2479
Abstract
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become a milestone for the management of aortic stenosis in a growing number of patients who are unfavorable candidates for surgery. With the new generation of transcatheter heart valves (THV), the feasibility of transcatheter mitral valve replacement [...] Read more.
Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has become a milestone for the management of aortic stenosis in a growing number of patients who are unfavorable candidates for surgery. With the new generation of transcatheter heart valves (THV), the feasibility of transcatheter mitral valve replacement (TMVR) for degenerated mitral bioprostheses and failed annuloplasty rings has been demonstrated. In this setting, computational simulations are modernizing the preoperative planning of transcatheter heart valve interventions by predicting the outcome of the bioprosthesis interaction with the human host in a patient-specific fashion. However, computational modeling needs to carry out increasingly challenging levels including the verification and validation to obtain accurate and realistic predictions. This review aims to provide an overall assessment of the recent advances in computational modeling for TAVR and TMVR as well as gaps in the knowledge limiting model credibility and reliability. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis)
11 pages, 4920 KiB  
Review
Is the Number of Appointments for Complete Denture Fabrication Reduced with CAD-CAM? A Literature Review
by Aristeidis Villias, Hercules Karkazis, Stavros Yannikakis, Ioli Ioanna Artopoulou and Gregory Polyzois
Prosthesis 2022, 4(1), 91-101; https://doi.org/10.3390/prosthesis4010010 - 18 Feb 2022
Cited by 7 | Viewed by 4066
Abstract
One of the key arguments in favor of digitally produced complete dentures (CDs) is the requirement for less patient visits in comparison to the conventional workflow. However, it is not yet clear if this argument is accurate; nor, if indeed the insertion of [...] Read more.
One of the key arguments in favor of digitally produced complete dentures (CDs) is the requirement for less patient visits in comparison to the conventional workflow. However, it is not yet clear if this argument is accurate; nor, if indeed the insertion of the complete dentures is achieved in fewer appointments, how many are required. The purpose of this literature review was to investigate the reported number of required patient visits for the production of digitally fabricated CDs. An electronic search was performed in PubMed/MEDLINE using three groups of keywords: “complete dentures”, “CAD/CAM”, and “Appointments” with their alternative forms. Out of the initial 157 results, 36 articles were automatically selected utilizing exclusion keywords. After consensus between the two examiners, eight articles were finally analyzed and presented in a table. The majority (75%) of the reports came from institutions, and the average number of appointments up to complete denture insertion was 4.1, not always including try-in dentures. In this study, it can be concluded that, with a digital workflow, the insertion appointment is reached in fewer visits than the conventional five-visit procedure which is commonly taught in dental schools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Review Papers for Prosthesis)
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