Special Issue "Tomography in Dentistry"

A special issue of Dentistry Journal (ISSN 2304-6767).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 December 2015).

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Tolga Tozum
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Periodontics, College of Dentistry, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL 60612, USA
Interests: periodontics; oral surgery; dentistry; oral rehabilitation
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Tomography is a significantly growing area in advanced dentistry, including clinical and basic science aspects. This Special Issue will include different aspects of dental tomography. Many disciplines use dental/oral tomography globally and have published significant amounts of scientific evidence related to advanced screening. Oral diagnostic sciences, oral radiology, periodontics, implant dentistry, oral and maxillofacial surgery, orthodontics, pediatric dentistry, and prosthodontics are fields that have all presented important results to dental and medical literature. This Special Issue will focus on advanced diagnosis of the oral and maxillofacial region, and will try to summarize the use of this technology as an update for dental students, general practitioners, specialists, and researchers who are interested in a globally proven technique in dentistry.

Dr. Tolga F. Tozum
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Dentistry Journal is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1400 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • dental tomography
  • dental implants
  • periodontics
  • oral surgery
  • orthodontics
  • child
  • anatomy
  • diagnosis
  • advanced screening
  • oral radiology

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Article
Mineralization of Early Stage Carious Lesions In Vitro—A Quantitative Approach
Dent. J. 2015, 3(4), 111-122; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj3040111 - 10 Oct 2015
Cited by 11 | Viewed by 2818
Abstract
Micro computed tomography has been combined with dedicated data analysis for the in vitro quantification of sub-surface enamel lesion mineralization. Two artificial white spot lesions, generated on a human molar crown in vitro, were examined. One lesion was treated with a self-assembling [...] Read more.
Micro computed tomography has been combined with dedicated data analysis for the in vitro quantification of sub-surface enamel lesion mineralization. Two artificial white spot lesions, generated on a human molar crown in vitro, were examined. One lesion was treated with a self-assembling peptide intended to trigger nucleation of hydroxyapatite crystals. We non-destructively determined the local X-ray attenuation within the specimens before and after treatment. The three-dimensional data was rigidly registered. Three interpolation methods, i.e., nearest neighbor, tri-linear, and tri-cubic interpolation were evaluated. The mineralization of the affected regions was quantified via joint histogram analysis, i.e., a voxel-by-voxel comparison of the tomography data before and after mineralization. After ten days incubation, the mean mineralization coefficient reached 35.5% for the peptide-treated specimen compared to 11.5% for the control. This pilot study does not give any evidence for the efficacy of peptide treatment nor allows estimating the necessary number of specimens to achieve significance, but shows a sound methodological approach on the basis of the joint histogram analysis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tomography in Dentistry)
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Case Report
Arrested Pneumatization of the Sphenoid Sinus on Large Field-of-View Cone Beam Computed Tomography Studies
Dent. J. 2015, 3(2), 67-76; https://doi.org/10.3390/dj3020067 - 11 May 2015
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 4552
Abstract
Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a normal anatomical variant. The aim of this report is to define cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) characteristics of arrested pneumatization of sphenoid sinus in an effort to help differentiate it from invasive or lytic skull [...] Read more.
Arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus is a normal anatomical variant. The aim of this report is to define cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) characteristics of arrested pneumatization of sphenoid sinus in an effort to help differentiate it from invasive or lytic skull base lesions. Two cases are presented with incidental findings. Both studies, acquired for other diagnostic purposes, demonstrated unique osseous patterns that were eventually deemed to be anatomic variations in the absence of clinical signs and symptoms although the pattern of bone loss and remodeling was diagnosed as pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus by a panel of medical and maxillofacial radiologists following contrasted advanced imaging. It is important to differentiate arrested pneumatization of the sphenoid sinus from lesions, such as arachnoid granulations, acoustic neuroma, glioma, metastatic lesions, meningioma, or chordoma, to prevent unnecessary biopsies or exploratory surgeries that would consequently reduce treatment costs and alleviate anxiety in patients. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Tomography in Dentistry)
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