ijerph-logo

Journal Browser

Journal Browser

Special Issue "SARS-CoV-2 Environmental Prevention Method: From Public Spaces to Medical Settings"

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Infectious Disease Epidemiology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2021).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Luca Fiorillo
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences, Morphological and Functional Images, School of Dentistry University of Messina, 98100 Messina, Italy
2. Multidisciplinary Department of Medical-Surgical and Odontostomatological Specialties, University of Campania “Luigi Vanvitelli”, 80121 Naples, Italy
Interests: oral health; public health; systemic disease; biomaterials; microbiomes; infection risk; oral surgery; rehabilitative medicine; environment disinfection
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals
Dr. Francesca Cicciù
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Unità Operativa di Patologia Clinica, ARNAS Garibaldi Centro, 95123 Catania, Italy
Interests: healthcare workers; public health; microbiology
Dr. Rosa De Stefano
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biomedical and Dental Sciences, Morphological and Functional Images, University of Messina, 98100 Messina, Italy
Interests: psychology; public health; socioeconomic behaviors; quality of life
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The SARS-CoV-2 pandemic has shaken the world, especially in the first months of 2020. Much confusion, spread by scientific disagreement and poor media information, has worsened this situation in the population. The purpose of this Special Issue is to promote and disseminate knowledge on the characteristics of the environmental and interindividual spread of this virus. Beyond this, prevention and contagion models will be another topic to consider. The use of personal protective equipment has been imposed on the populations of many states, and this seems to have slowed, although not stopped, the spread of the virus. Many scientific notes, in fact, concern the spread of the virus following the contamination of environments or surfaces, especially in public facilities, on public transport and in health facilities of all kinds.

Fully elucidating the methods of spreading the virus and its persistence on surfaces, and proposing and planning prevention plans, will be the first steps to defeating this pandemic.

Prof. Dr. Luca Fiorillo
Dr. Francesca Cicciù
Dr. Rosa De Stefano
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access semimonthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2300 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • SARS-CoV-2
  • Coronavirus disease 2019
  • Coronavirus
  • Pandemic
  • Disinfection
  • Prevention
  • Socioeconomic behaviors in pandemics
  • Public health
  • Public environments
  • Medical settings
  • Protective equipment
  • Mathematical model
  • Virus persistence

Published Papers (4 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Editorial

Jump to: Research, Review

Editorial
An Eventual Sars-CoV-2 Infection Prevention Protocol in the Medical Setting and Dental Office
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(5), 2593; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18052593 - 05 Mar 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 914
Abstract
The current Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic has affected the entire world population, and in particular the medical-health field, especially dentistry [...] Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Research

Jump to: Editorial, Review

Article
SARS-CoV-2 Short-Time Infection Produces Relevant Cytopathic Effects in Vero E6 Cell Line
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(17), 9020; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18179020 - 26 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 561
Abstract
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is mainly transmitted through respiratory droplets from positive subjects to susceptible hosts or by direct contact with an infected individual. Our study focuses on the in vitro minimal time of viral absorption as well as [...] Read more.
Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus type 2 (SARS-CoV-2) is mainly transmitted through respiratory droplets from positive subjects to susceptible hosts or by direct contact with an infected individual. Our study focuses on the in vitro minimal time of viral absorption as well as the minimal quantity of virus able to establish a persistent infection in Vero E6 cells. We observed that 1 min of in vitro virus exposure is sufficient to generate a cytopathic effect in cells after 7 days of infection, even at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) value of 0.01. Being aware that our findings have been obtained using an in vitro cellular model, we demonstrated that short-time exposures and low viral concentrations are able to cause infection, thus opening questions about the risk of SARS-CoV-2 transmissibility even following short contact times. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Article
COVID-19 Stressors on Migrant Workers in Vietnam: Cumulative Risk Consideration
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(16), 8757; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18168757 - 19 Aug 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 931
Abstract
This study explored the impact of COVID-19 on migrant workers in Vietnam, using a cumulative risk assessment (CRA) framework which comprises four domains (workplace, environment, individual and community). A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data were collected in 2020 through a self-administered questionnaire with [...] Read more.
This study explored the impact of COVID-19 on migrant workers in Vietnam, using a cumulative risk assessment (CRA) framework which comprises four domains (workplace, environment, individual and community). A cross-sectional study was conducted. Data were collected in 2020 through a self-administered questionnaire with 445 domestic migrant workers in two industrial zones in two northern provinces (Bac Ninh and Ninh Binh) in Vietnam. The majority of migrant workers were female (65.2%), aged between 18 and 29 years old (66.8%), and had high school or higher education level qualifications. Most migrant workers had good knowledge about preventive measures (>90%) and correct practices on COVID-19 prevention (81.1%). Three health risk behaviors were reported: 10% of participants smoked, 25% consumed alcohol and 23.1% were engaged in online gaming. In terms of workplace, occupational working conditions were good. Noise was the most commonly reported hazard (29%). Regarding environment, about two-thirds of migrant workers lived in a small house (<36 m2). Most participants (80.4%) lived with their families. About community domain, many reported low salary or losing their job during January–July, 2020. Most migrants received information about COVID-19. The migrant workers suffered from poor health and low occupational safety, fear of job loss and income cut, poor housing and living conditions and limited access to public services. The holistic approach to address stressors is recommended to improve health and safety of migrant workers. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Review

Jump to: Editorial, Research

Review
Review of Associations between Built Environment Characteristics and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus 2 Infection Risk
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2021, 18(14), 7561; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph18147561 - 15 Jul 2021
Viewed by 1103
Abstract
The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has stimulated intensive research interest in its transmission pathways and infection factors, e.g., socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, climatology, baseline health conditions or pre-existing diseases, and government policies. Meanwhile, some empirical studies suggested that built environment attributes may be [...] Read more.
The coronavirus disease 2019 pandemic has stimulated intensive research interest in its transmission pathways and infection factors, e.g., socioeconomic and demographic characteristics, climatology, baseline health conditions or pre-existing diseases, and government policies. Meanwhile, some empirical studies suggested that built environment attributes may be associated with the transmission mechanism and infection risk of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2). However, no review has been conducted to explore the effect of built environment characteristics on the infection risk. This research gap prevents government officials and urban planners from creating effective urban design guidelines to contain SARS-CoV-2 infections and face future pandemic challenges. This review summarizes evidence from 25 empirical studies and provides an overview of the effect of built environment on SARS-CoV-2 infection risk. Virus infection risk was positively associated with the density of commercial facilities, roads, and schools and with public transit accessibility, whereas it was negatively associated with the availability of green spaces. This review recommends several directions for future studies, namely using longitudinal research design and individual-level data, considering multilevel factors and extending to diversified geographic areas. Full article
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop