Management of Cardiovascular Disease in Cancer Survivors through Lifestyle Modification

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (10 June 2022) | Viewed by 10446

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 1T8, Canada
Interests: exercise science; exercise intervention; exercise oncology; sport science; physical fitness; cancer survivorship; implementation science
Special Issues, Collections and Topics in MDPI journals

E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
School of Health and Human Performance, Faculty of Health, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
Interests: Kinesiology; Exercise and cardiac disease; Cardiac disease prevention; Cardiac cellular function; Cardiac function and aging

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Guest Editor
Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Hull, Hull HU6 7RX, UK
Interests: self-efficacy; exercise; cancer; exercise science; sport science; physical fitness; resistance training; exercise intervention; physical activity assessment; physical education

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

There is a significant overlap in the risk factors that contribute to the development of cancer and cardiovascular disease (CVD). This, in conjunction with the cardiotoxicity associated with several cancer treatments, significantly increases the risk of cancer survivors developing CVD. This Special Issue of Current Oncology aims to showcase research that uses interventions to reduce the risk of or manage CVD in cancer survivors. We invite researchers to address either one of the following topics or a related topic:

  • lifestyle interventions to prevent/mitigate treatment-related cardiotoxicity;
  • lifestyle interventions to promote cardiovascular health in cancer survivors;
  • lifestyle interventions used to manage CVD in cancer survivors; or
  • interventions aimed at reducing risk factors common to cancer and CVD.

Prof. Dr. Melanie Keats
Dr. Scott A. Grandy
Dr. Cynthia Forbes
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Current Oncology is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2200 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • lifestyle interventions
  • cancer survivors
  • physical activity
  • cardiovascular disease

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

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10 pages, 264 KiB  
Article
Association between Fruit and Vegetable Intake and Physical Activity among Breast Cancer Survivors: A Longitudinal Study
by Steve Amireault, Jennifer Brunet, Jordan D. Kurth, Angela J. Fong and Catherine M. Sabiston
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(6), 5025-5034; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28060422 - 30 Nov 2021
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 2522
Abstract
This study examines the association between rates of change in daily fruit and vegetable intake and in weekly levels of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) over a 15-month period in women following primary treatment completion for breast cancer. Breast cancer survivors (N [...] Read more.
This study examines the association between rates of change in daily fruit and vegetable intake and in weekly levels of moderate-to-vigorous intensity physical activity (MVPA) over a 15-month period in women following primary treatment completion for breast cancer. Breast cancer survivors (N = 199) self-reported fruit and vegetable intake and wore an accelerometer for 7 consecutive days to measure levels of MVPA on five occasions every 3 months. Multivariate latent growth modeling revealed that the rate of change in fruit and vegetable intake was not associated with the rate of change in levels of MVPA. Baseline (Mean = 3.46 months post-treatment) levels of MVPA were not associated with the rate of change of daily fruit and vegetable intake; likewise, baseline fruit and vegetable intake was not associated with the rate of change in levels of MVPA. Behavioral interventions promoting fruit and vegetable intake should not be assumed to yield concomitant effects in promoting MVPA or vice versa. Full article

Review

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18 pages, 309 KiB  
Review
Exercise to Reduce Anthracycline-Mediated Cardiovascular Complications in Breast Cancer Survivors
by Sonu S. Varghese, Will J. Johnston, Cameron R. Eekhoudt, Melanie R. Keats, Davinder S. Jassal and Scott A. Grandy
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(5), 4139-4156; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050351 - 13 Oct 2021
Cited by 9 | Viewed by 3493
Abstract
While developments in cancer therapeutics have greatly reduced morbidity and mortality in females with breast cancer, it comes at a cost of an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. In particular, anthracyclines, like doxorubicin, which are a mainstay of current chemotherapy regimens, are associated [...] Read more.
While developments in cancer therapeutics have greatly reduced morbidity and mortality in females with breast cancer, it comes at a cost of an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. In particular, anthracyclines, like doxorubicin, which are a mainstay of current chemotherapy regimens, are associated with dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Exercise has been widely accepted as an effective intervention in reducing cardiovascular risk in a variety of different clinical conditions. However, the benefits of exercise in anthracycline-mediated cardiotoxicity are not clearly understood. First, this review discusses the pre-clinical studies which have elucidated the cardioprotective mechanisms of aerobic and resistance exercise in improving cardiovascular function in the setting of anthracycline treatment. Next, it aims to summarize the results of aerobic and resistance exercise clinical trials conducted in females with breast cancer who received anthracycline-based chemotherapy. The review further discusses the current exercise guidelines for women undergoing chemotherapy and contraindications for exercise. Finally, the review addresses gaps in research, specifically the need for further clinical trials to establish a recommended exercise prescription within this patient population. Full article

Other

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23 pages, 1095 KiB  
Study Protocol
An Individualized Exercise Intervention for People with Multiple Myeloma—Study Protocol of a Randomized Waitlist-Controlled Trial
by Jennifer L. Nicol, Carmel Woodrow, Brent J. Cunningham, Peter Mollee, Nicholas Weber, Michelle D. Smith, Andrew J. Nicol, Louisa G. Gordon, Michelle M. Hill and Tina L. Skinner
Curr. Oncol. 2022, 29(2), 901-923; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol29020077 - 07 Feb 2022
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 3507
Abstract
People with multiple myeloma (MM) are second only to people with lung cancer for the poorest reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of all cancer types. Whether exercise can improve HRQoL in MM, where bone pain and lesions are common, requires investigation. This [...] Read more.
People with multiple myeloma (MM) are second only to people with lung cancer for the poorest reported health-related quality of life (HRQoL) of all cancer types. Whether exercise can improve HRQoL in MM, where bone pain and lesions are common, requires investigation. This trial aims to evaluate the efficacy of an exercise intervention compared with control on HRQoL in people with MM. Following baseline testing, people with MM (n = 60) will be randomized to an exercise (EX) or waitlist control (WT) group. EX will complete 12-weeks of supervised (24 sessions) and unsupervised (12 sessions) individualized, modular multimodal exercise training. From weeks 12–52, EX continue unsupervised training thrice weekly, with one optional supervised group-based session weekly from weeks 12–24. The WT will be asked to maintain their current activity levels for the first 12-weeks, before completing the same protocol as EX for the following 52 weeks. Primary (patient-reported HRQoL) and secondary (bone health and pain, fatigue, cardiorespiratory fitness, muscle strength, body composition, disease response, and blood biomarkers) outcomes will be assessed at baseline, 12-, 24- and 52-weeks. Adverse events, attendance, and adherence will be recorded and cost-effectiveness analysis performed. The findings will inform whether exercise should be included as part of standard myeloma care to improve the health of this unique population. Full article
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