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Review

Exercise to Reduce Anthracycline-Mediated Cardiovascular Complications in Breast Cancer Survivors

1
Institute of Cardiovascular Sciences, St. Boniface Hospital Albrechtsen Research Centre, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R2H 2A6, Canada
2
School of Health & Human Performance, Faculty of Health, Dalhousie University, 6230 South Street, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
3
Beatrice Hunter Cancer Research Institute, Halifax, NS B3H 4R2, Canada
4
Department of Medicine, Nova Scotia Health, Central Zone, Halifax, NS B3H 1V7, Canada
5
Section of Cardiology, Department of Internal Medicine, Max Rady College of Medicine, Rady Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB R3E 0W2, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28(5), 4139-4156; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050351
Received: 25 August 2021 / Revised: 22 September 2021 / Accepted: 23 September 2021 / Published: 13 October 2021
While developments in cancer therapeutics have greatly reduced morbidity and mortality in females with breast cancer, it comes at a cost of an increased risk of cardiovascular complications. In particular, anthracyclines, like doxorubicin, which are a mainstay of current chemotherapy regimens, are associated with dose-dependent cardiotoxicity. Exercise has been widely accepted as an effective intervention in reducing cardiovascular risk in a variety of different clinical conditions. However, the benefits of exercise in anthracycline-mediated cardiotoxicity are not clearly understood. First, this review discusses the pre-clinical studies which have elucidated the cardioprotective mechanisms of aerobic and resistance exercise in improving cardiovascular function in the setting of anthracycline treatment. Next, it aims to summarize the results of aerobic and resistance exercise clinical trials conducted in females with breast cancer who received anthracycline-based chemotherapy. The review further discusses the current exercise guidelines for women undergoing chemotherapy and contraindications for exercise. Finally, the review addresses gaps in research, specifically the need for further clinical trials to establish a recommended exercise prescription within this patient population. View Full-Text
Keywords: exercise; breast cancer; anthracycline; cardiotoxicity; cardioprotection; aerobic; resistance exercise; breast cancer; anthracycline; cardiotoxicity; cardioprotection; aerobic; resistance
MDPI and ACS Style

Varghese, S.S.; Johnston, W.J.; Eekhoudt, C.R.; Keats, M.R.; Jassal, D.S.; Grandy, S.A. Exercise to Reduce Anthracycline-Mediated Cardiovascular Complications in Breast Cancer Survivors. Curr. Oncol. 2021, 28, 4139-4156. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050351

AMA Style

Varghese SS, Johnston WJ, Eekhoudt CR, Keats MR, Jassal DS, Grandy SA. Exercise to Reduce Anthracycline-Mediated Cardiovascular Complications in Breast Cancer Survivors. Current Oncology. 2021; 28(5):4139-4156. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050351

Chicago/Turabian Style

Varghese, Sonu S., Will J. Johnston, Cameron R. Eekhoudt, Melanie R. Keats, Davinder S. Jassal, and Scott A. Grandy 2021. "Exercise to Reduce Anthracycline-Mediated Cardiovascular Complications in Breast Cancer Survivors" Current Oncology 28, no. 5: 4139-4156. https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol28050351

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