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Physical Activity and Exercise in Cancer Care

A special issue of International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health (ISSN 1660-4601). This special issue belongs to the section "Exercise and Health".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (1 December 2023) | Viewed by 3803

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Guest Editor
School of Health and Human Performance, Dalhousie University, Halifax, NS B3H 1T8, Canada
Interests: exercise science; exercise intervention; exercise oncology; sport science; physical fitness; cancer survivorship; implementation science
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment often lead to a decreased quality of life and accelerated physical deconditioning. Evidence suggests that physical activity and exercise can help prevent these changes, improving the health of people living with a cancer diagnosis, or even improve the effectiveness of contemporary or emerging cancer therapies. Despite this, the benefits of physical activity and exercise interventions, as well as ways to best implement them, are not fully determined. It is therefore important to further study how best to harness exercise and physical activity interventions in the context of cancer care in order to ultimately improve the lives of people living with a cancer diagnosis. This Special Issue is dedicated to research studies investigating the effects of physical activity and exercise interventions on cancer and cancer care. All types of studies will be considered for publication (e.g., implementation effectiveness trials, randomized clinical trials, clinical research, preclinical research, systematic reviews, scoping reviews, etc.), so long as they relate to this theme.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in Current Oncology.

Prof. Dr. Melanie Keats
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2500 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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17 pages, 529 KiB  
Article
Correlates of Physical Activity Participation among Individuals Diagnosed with Cancer: An Application of the Multi-Process Action Control Framework
by Allyson Tabaczynski, Kelly P. Arbour-Nicitopoulos, Ryan E. Rhodes, Catherine M. Sabiston and Linda Trinh
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(5), 4345; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20054345 - 28 Feb 2023
Cited by 1 | Viewed by 1618
Abstract
Background: The purpose of this study was to test Multi-Process Action Control (M-PAC) processes as correlates of physical activity (PA) intention formation and translation (i.e., action control) in individuals diagnosed with cancer. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional survey, completed from July to [...] Read more.
Background: The purpose of this study was to test Multi-Process Action Control (M-PAC) processes as correlates of physical activity (PA) intention formation and translation (i.e., action control) in individuals diagnosed with cancer. Methods: This study was a cross-sectional survey, completed from July to November of 2020 during the COVID-19 pandemic. PA and M-PAC processes were self-reported using the Godin Leisure-Time Exercise Questionnaire and questionnaires for reflective (instrumental/affective attitudes, perceived opportunity/capability), regulatory (e.g., goal-setting, planning), and reflexive processes (habit, identity). Separate hierarchical multinomial logistic regression models determined correlates of intention formation and action control. Results: Participants (n = 347; Mage= 48.2 ± 15.6) were primarily diagnosed with breast cancer (27.4%) and at a localized stage (85.0%). Most participants intended to perform PA (70.9%), yet only 50.4% met guidelines. Affective judgements (p < 0.001) and perceived capability (p < 0.01) were significantly associated with intention formation. Preliminary models indicated employment, affective judgements, perceived capability, and self-regulation to be significant (ps < 0.05) correlates of action control, but in the final model, only surgical treatment (p = 0.02) and PA identity (p < 0.001) were significantly associated with action control. Conclusion: Reflective processes were associated with PA intention formation, while reflexive processes were associated with PA action control. Behavior change efforts for individuals diagnosed with cancer should extend beyond social-cognitive approaches to include regulatory and reflexive processes of PA behavior (i.e., PA identity). Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Exercise in Cancer Care)
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Review

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23 pages, 935 KiB  
Review
Use of Wearable Activity-Monitoring Technologies to Promote Physical Activity in Cancer Survivors: Challenges and Opportunities for Improved Cancer Care
by Melanie R. Keats, Xing Yu, Molly Sweeney Magee, Cynthia C. Forbes, Scott A. Grandy, Ellen Sweeney and Trevor J. B. Dummer
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2023, 20(6), 4784; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph20064784 - 8 Mar 2023
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 1846
Abstract
The aim of this review was to explore the acceptability, opportunities, and challenges associated with wearable activity-monitoring technology to increase physical activity (PA) behavior in cancer survivors. A search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and SportDiscus was conducted from 1 January 2011 through 3 [...] Read more.
The aim of this review was to explore the acceptability, opportunities, and challenges associated with wearable activity-monitoring technology to increase physical activity (PA) behavior in cancer survivors. A search of Medline, Embase, CINAHL, and SportDiscus was conducted from 1 January 2011 through 3 October 2022. The search was limited to English language, and peer-reviewed original research. Studies were included if they reported the use of an activity monitor in adults (+18 years) with a history of cancer with the intent to motivate PA behavior. Our search identified 1832 published articles, of which 28 met inclusion/exclusion criteria. Eighteen of these studies included post-treatment cancer survivors, eight were on active cancer treatment, and two were long-term cancer survivor studies. ActiGraph accelerometers were the primary technology used to monitor PA behaviors, with Fitbit as the most commonly utilized self-monitoring wearable technology. Overall, wearable activity monitors were found to be an acceptable and useful tool in improving self-awareness, motivating behavioral change, and increasing PA levels. Self-monitoring wearable activity devices have a positive impact on short-term PA behaviors in cancer survivors, but the increase in PA gradually attenuated through the maintenance phase. Further study is needed to evaluate and increase the sustainability of the use of wearable technologies to support PA in cancer survivors. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Exercise in Cancer Care)
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