Physical Activity and Exercise in Cancer Care

A special issue of Current Oncology (ISSN 1718-7729).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 10 June 2024 | Viewed by 2199

Special Issue Editor

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

A cancer diagnosis and subsequent treatment often lead to a decreased quality of life and accelerated physical deconditioning. Evidence suggests that physical activity and exercise can help prevent these changes, improving the health of people living with a cancer diagnosis, or even improve the effectiveness of contemporary or emerging cancer therapies. Despite this, the benefits of physical activity and exercise interventions, as well as ways to best implement them, are not fully determined. It is therefore important to further study how best to harness exercise and physical activity interventions in the context of cancer care in order to ultimately improve the lives of people living with a cancer diagnosis. This Special Issue is dedicated to research studies investigating the effects of physical activity and exercise interventions on cancer and cancer care. All types of studies will be considered for publication (e.g., implementation effectiveness trials, randomized clinical trials, clinical research, preclinical research, systematic reviews, scoping reviews, etc.), so long as they relate to this theme.

You may choose our Joint Special Issue in IJERPH.

Prof. Dr. Melanie Keats
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

14 pages, 695 KiB  
Article
“The Ability to Go Out into the World Is the Most Important Thing”—A Qualitative Study of Important Exercise Outcomes for People with Lung Cancer
Curr. Oncol. 2024, 31(2), 733-746; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol31020054 - 29 Jan 2024
Viewed by 636
Abstract
Whilst existing quantitative research identifies outcomes believed to be important by researchers and clinicians, it may neglect outcomes that are meaningful to patients. This study aimed to explore the outcomes of exercise that are important to people with lung cancer and their carers. [...] Read more.
Whilst existing quantitative research identifies outcomes believed to be important by researchers and clinicians, it may neglect outcomes that are meaningful to patients. This study aimed to explore the outcomes of exercise that are important to people with lung cancer and their carers. Data collection involved a qualitative methodology including semi-structured interviews and focus groups. Question guide development was informed by the International Classification of Functioning (ICF) framework. Data were analyzed by two researchers with NVivo (v12) software using a conventional content analysis process, followed by directed content analysis to map outcomes to the ICF. Conduct and reporting adhered to COREQ guidelines. Fifteen participants provided data. Most participants had received their diagnoses 24 months prior to study involvement (n = 9), and one-third had completed treatment (n = 5). Important outcomes were reported by participants across all domains of the ICF: activity and participation (n = 24), body function (n = 19), body structure (n = 5), environmental factors (n = 5), and personal factors (n = 1). Additional code categories pertained to the impacts of non-cancer factors such as age, frailty, and comorbidities; identifying barriers to exercise; and individualizing outcome measures. Clinicians and researchers should consider selecting outcomes from all relevant domains of the ICF, with a focus on the activity and participation domain, in addition to non-cancer factors such as ageing, frailty, and co-morbidities. Feedback should be provided to patients following outcome measures collection and reassessment. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Exercise in Cancer Care)
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15 pages, 2487 KiB  
Article
Exercise Programming Modelling a Standard of Care Approach Improves Physical Health and Patient-Reported Outcomes in Individuals Living with Breast Cancer: A Pilot Study
Curr. Oncol. 2023, 30(8), 7203-7217; https://doi.org/10.3390/curroncol30080522 - 26 Jul 2023
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Abstract
Controlled study designs widely report that exercise improves the health of individuals living with breast cancer. Still, many individuals living with breast cancer are not active enough to experience the benefits of exercise. The Activating Cancer Communities through an Exercise Strategy for Survivors [...] Read more.
Controlled study designs widely report that exercise improves the health of individuals living with breast cancer. Still, many individuals living with breast cancer are not active enough to experience the benefits of exercise. The Activating Cancer Communities through an Exercise Strategy for Survivors study was developed to reach more individuals living with cancer. This report describes the effects of a 12-week individualized exercise program that models a standard-of-care approach on body composition, physical fitness, and patient-reported outcomes in individuals living with breast cancer. Individuals living with breast cancer were recruited for the study and completed an exercise program twice weekly overseen by a Clinical Exercise Physiologist. A total of 43 participants completed the exercise intervention, and 36 withdrew from the study. All participants had significantly improved aerobic fitness, waist circumference, hip circumference, lower body endurance, physical activity behaviour, health-related quality of life, emotional status, and fatigue levels after completing the program. Flexibility, balance, and sleep scores did not change. The results from the 12-week individualized exercise program largely align with the results from more controlled study designs. These results support future initiatives integrating exercise therapy into the standard of care for individuals living with breast cancer. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Physical Activity and Exercise in Cancer Care)
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