The Role of Lipids in Skin and Their Impact on Stress, Aging and Inflammation

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 June 2022) | Viewed by 27856

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Research and Development, APIVITA SA, 19003 Athens, Greece
Interests: bioactivity; marine biotechnology; in vitro testing; skin cells; skin aging

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Guest Editor
Laboratory of Pharmaceutical Technology, Department of Pharmacy, School of Health Sciences, University of Patras, 26504 Patras, Greece
Interests: nanotechnology; liposomes; nanoemulsion; model lipid membranes; drug targeting
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Lipids are highly important biomolecules for the formation and function of cellular membranes, cellular signaling and cell metabolism. Specifically, in human skin, lipids additionally serve in the formation of the epidermal barrier. On the other hand, lipids also regulate the permeability, physical properties and antimicrobial defenses of the skin. Thus, skin serves as an ideal organ for studying the pleiotropic effects of lipids, as it is frequently exposed to oxidative, chemical and thermal stress.

Research has unveiled the biological functions of lipid modifications in skin. These studies have emphasized their important role in stress and immune responses, aging processes, and inflammation in the skin. In this issue, we would like to present a collection of recent developments in skin lipids and their biological importance in the skin, focusing on their impact on stress responses, aging and inflammation.

Dr. Sophia Letsiou
Prof. Dr. Sophia Hatziantoniou
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • Epilipidome
  • Human skin
  • Epidermal barrier
  • Aging process
  • Stress response
  • Inflammation

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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15 pages, 1475 KiB  
Article
Three New Dexpanthenol-Containing Face Creams: Performance and Acceptability after Single and Repeated Applications in Subjects of Different Ethnicity with Dry and Sensitive Skin
by Ana Barrionuevo-Gonzalez, Sonja Trapp, Raffaella de Salvo, Marina Reitmann, Eva Cassar, Siham Rharbaoui, Florence Reber and Hans Stettler
Cosmetics 2021, 8(4), 93; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8040093 - 29 Sep 2021
Cited by 3 | Viewed by 4432
Abstract
Three novel face creams containing dexpanthenol with different lipid contents were developed for dry skin sufferers: a day face cream (DFC), a day face cream with sun protection (DFC-SPF), and a night face cream (NFC). Three identically designed studies (N = 42–44 each) [...] Read more.
Three novel face creams containing dexpanthenol with different lipid contents were developed for dry skin sufferers: a day face cream (DFC), a day face cream with sun protection (DFC-SPF), and a night face cream (NFC). Three identically designed studies (N = 42–44 each) were conducted with healthy adults of three ethnicities (African, Asian, Caucasian) with dry/sensitive skin. Effects on stratum corneum (SC) hydration, SC lipid content, and skin elasticity were quantified by established noninvasive methods during the 4-week studies. After single and repeated once-daily applications of the face creams, facial hydration significantly increased from baseline. On day 28, the mean increments in skin hydration amounted to 27%, 26%, and 27% (p < 0.0001 each) for DFC, DFC-SPF, and NFC, respectively. Favorable effects of DFC, DFC-SPF, and NFC on facial moisturization were observed in all three ethnic groups. The enhancements in SC hydration were not paralleled by improvements in skin elasticity parameters but lipid analyses showed significant increases in SC cholesterol, SC free fatty acid, and/or SC ceramide levels. All three face creams were well tolerated and achieved a high product satisfaction and acceptability by study participants. Our findings support the once-daily use of the face creams in adults of different ethnicities with dry and sensitive skin. Full article
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7 pages, 821 KiB  
Communication
Exploring the Protective Effects of Phaeodactylum tricornutum Extract on LPS-Treated Fibroblasts
by Dimitra Mosxou and Sophia Letsiou
Cosmetics 2021, 8(3), 76; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8030076 - 25 Aug 2021
Cited by 6 | Viewed by 3148
Abstract
Background: Microalgal extracts are an important source of bioactive compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can be used in cosmetics. The microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PT) is known for its high content of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to attenuate inflammation. Here, [...] Read more.
Background: Microalgal extracts are an important source of bioactive compounds with antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties that can be used in cosmetics. The microalgae Phaeodactylum tricornutum (PT) is known for its high content of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to attenuate inflammation. Here, we explore the effects of aqueous microencapsulated extract of PT on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDF) to underline its application as an active ingredient in cosmetics. Methods: We assessed cell viability using MTT assay, so as to target any potential cytotoxicity of the extract. Moreover, with the aid of RT-qPCR, we studied the transcript accumulation of genes involved in cell antioxidant response, cell proliferation, and inflammation. Results: Our results revealed that the hydrolyzed rice flour-encapsulated (HRF) PT extract promotes anti-inflammatory and antioxidant response, increasing cell proliferation in NHDF cells. Conclusions: Our data indicate a promising use of HRF-encapsulated PT extract in cosmetics by reducing skin inflammation. Full article
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Review

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11 pages, 535 KiB  
Review
Skin Care Formulations and Lipid Carriers as Skin Moisturizing Agents
by Panagoula Pavlou, Angeliki Siamidi, Athanasia Varvaresou and Marilena Vlachou
Cosmetics 2021, 8(3), 89; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8030089 - 17 Sep 2021
Cited by 15 | Viewed by 12641
Abstract
Skin care formulations have evolved as the interaction of health and beauty products for the skin. Their benefits are based on the combination of cosmetic active ingredients and targeted application. Cosmetic actives have been used in novel formulations for decades (sunscreens, anti-aging treatments, [...] Read more.
Skin care formulations have evolved as the interaction of health and beauty products for the skin. Their benefits are based on the combination of cosmetic active ingredients and targeted application. Cosmetic actives have been used in novel formulations for decades (sunscreens, anti-aging treatments, etc.), but the problems with their low solubility, low penetration, and physicochemical instability when applied to the skin have yet to be solved. One way to circumvent these shortcomings is to use lipid carriers, which are known to play an important role in the solubility of poorly soluble compounds by facilitating skin permeation and improving stability. This review addresses recent advances in skin care products that use novel nanotechnology-based lipid systems (liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, etc.) to deliver moisturizing cosmetic actives and improve product efficacy. Full article
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10 pages, 483 KiB  
Review
Revealing the Correlation between Altered Skin Lipids Composition and Skin Disorders
by Katerina Drakou, Andrea Tsianni, Faye Vrani, Valia Kefala and Efstathios Rallis
Cosmetics 2021, 8(3), 88; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics8030088 - 15 Sep 2021
Cited by 8 | Viewed by 6039
Abstract
Human skin layers serve as a barrier between the body and the environment, by preventing water loss and blocking the entry of chemicals, allergens, and microbes. Recent data showed that skin lipids are vital ‘key players’ of several functions and mechanisms performing in [...] Read more.
Human skin layers serve as a barrier between the body and the environment, by preventing water loss and blocking the entry of chemicals, allergens, and microbes. Recent data showed that skin lipids are vital ‘key players’ of several functions and mechanisms performing in the skin, such as, barrier function and microbiome composition. Abnormalities in lipid composition have been observed in inflammatory cutaneous diseases with a disrupted skin barrier. This review aims to demonstrate the fundamental role of keratinocytes, sebocytes, and microbiome-derived lipids in the maintenance of the skin barrier. Furthermore, it would reveal the correlation between altered skin lipids’ composition, microbiome, and the occurrence of certain dermatological disorders such as acne vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, psoriasis, and rosacea. Full article
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