Special Issue "Cosmetics from Marine Sources"

A special issue of Cosmetics (ISSN 2079-9284).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (23 August 2017).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Dr. Herminia Domínguez
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Guest Editor
Department of Chemical Engineering, University of Vigo (Campus Ourense), Edificio Politécnico, As Lagoas, 32004 Ourense, Spain
Tel. +34 988 387082; Fax: + 34 988 387001
Interests: bioactive compounds; macroalgae; vegetal biomass; environmentally-friendly extraction technologies; membranes; waste valorisation
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Dr. María J. Pérez
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Departamento de Biología Funcional y Ciencias de la Salud, Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad de Vigo, Spain
Interests: aquatic microbiology; microbiological control; bacteriology; antimicrobial activity; cosmetic microbiology
Prof. Dr. Elena Falqué López
E-Mail
Guest Editor
Department of Analytical and Food Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of Vigo, Edificio Politécnico, As Lagoas s/n, 32004 Ourense, Spain
Interests: natural bioactive compounds; food chemistry; functional foods; nutraceuticals; agro-food quality control; byproduct valorization; beverages; algae; plants; essential oils; cosmetics; sensorial analysis; chemical analysis; GC–MS; extraction
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Marine organisms are a highly diverse, renewable and abundant source of compounds. Some of them are unique compounds, having structural and biological properties not found in terrestrial species. The interest of the cosmetic industry in the development of novel skin care products with bioactive properties and nutricosmetics from marine sources is increasing.

This Special Issue "Cosmetics from Marine Sources" is aimed at presenting the utilization of compounds from marine organisms and their incorporation in cosmetic products, to provide either technological functions or biological beneficial effects on human skin. This overview of the current knowledge in this field is provided through original papers, reviews and short communications.

Dr. Herminia Dominguez
Dr. María J. Pérez
Dr. Elena Falqué
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cosmetics is an international peer-reviewed open access quarterly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • seawater
  • bioactive compounds
  • plancton
  • seaweeds
  • marine animals
  • extremophiles
  • marine ingredients 
  • marine additives
  • formulation
  • sensory analysis
  • activities and functions

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
The Bioactivity Study of Active Compounds in Wolffia globosa Extract for an Alternative Source of Bioactive Substances
Cosmetics 2017, 4(4), 53; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics4040053 - 30 Nov 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
Wolffia globosa is a small plant found in the lagoons in tropical zones. The aim of our study was to examine the biological compounds found in W. globosa and their activities. The substances in W. globosa were extracted, isolated, and their chemical structures [...] Read more.
Wolffia globosa is a small plant found in the lagoons in tropical zones. The aim of our study was to examine the biological compounds found in W. globosa and their activities. The substances in W. globosa were extracted, isolated, and their chemical structures ascertained by Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) spectroscopy. The extract was tested for bioactivity, including antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and cytotoxic activities. The results showed that the isolated compounds in fraction two were mainly β-sitosterol and stigmasterol. The sterols found in the extract were able to inhibit nitric oxide production in RAW 264.7 macrophage cells, which implied an anti-inflammatory activity. The extract was found to be non-toxic to human dermal fibroblast cells with an IC50 of 106.38 ± 37.0 µg/mL. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics from Marine Sources)
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Open AccessArticle
Cosmetic Potential of Marine Fish Skin Collagen
Cosmetics 2017, 4(4), 39; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics4040039 - 12 Oct 2017
Cited by 16
Abstract
Many cosmetic formulations have collagen as a major component because of its significant benefits as a natural humectant and moisturizer. This industry is constantly looking for innovative, sustainable, and truly efficacious products, so marine collagen based formulations are arising as promising alternatives. A [...] Read more.
Many cosmetic formulations have collagen as a major component because of its significant benefits as a natural humectant and moisturizer. This industry is constantly looking for innovative, sustainable, and truly efficacious products, so marine collagen based formulations are arising as promising alternatives. A solid description and characterization of this protein is fundamental to guarantee the highest quality of each batch. In the present study, we present an extensive characterization of marine-derived collagen extracted from salmon and codfish skins, targeting its inclusion as component in cosmetic formulations. Chemical and physical characterizations were performed using several techniques such as sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), Fourier Transformation Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy rheology, circular dichroism, X-ray diffraction, humidity uptake, and a biological assessment of the extracts regarding their irritant potential. The results showed an isolation of type I collagen with high purity but with some structural and chemical differences between sources. Collagen demonstrated a good capacity to retain water, thus being suitable for dermal applications as a moisturizer. A topical exposure of collagen in a human reconstructed dermis, as well as the analysis of molecular markers for irritation and inflammation, exhibited no irritant potential. Thus, the isolation of collagen from fish skins for inclusion in dermocosmetic applications may constitute a sustainable and low-cost platform for the biotechnological valorization of fish by-products. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics from Marine Sources)
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Open AccessArticle
Evaluation of Genotoxic and DNA Photo-Protective Activity of Bryothamnion triquetrum and Halimeda incrassata Seaweeds Extracts
Cosmetics 2017, 4(3), 23; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics4030023 - 13 Jul 2017
Cited by 1
Abstract
The ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight is high on the earth surface, especially at low latitudes, raising the risk of skin diseases, including cancer. The use of natural compounds is a strategy to protect people against UV damage. Seaweeds are becoming increasingly influential [...] Read more.
The ultraviolet (UV) component of sunlight is high on the earth surface, especially at low latitudes, raising the risk of skin diseases, including cancer. The use of natural compounds is a strategy to protect people against UV damage. Seaweeds are becoming increasingly influential in the food industry, and are also used in the pharmacy and cosmetic industries, due to several bioactive demonstrated properties. This work analyzed the genotoxic and photoprotective effects of the aqueous extracts of two seaweed species: Bryothamnion triquetrum and Halimeda incrassata. A cell-free plasmid DNA assay was employed, allowing detection of DNA breaks. The plasmids were exposed to increasing concentrations of aqueous extracts. DNA break was produced at concentrations of 2.0 and 4.0 mg/mL in both seaweed extracts and, consequently, a genotoxic effect is postulated. This effect arises with higher exposure times. Additionally, different combinations of plasmid DNA, restriction enzymes (Eco RI, Bam HI, and Pvu II) and extracts were assayed. The extracts did not produce an interference effect in the reconnaissance of the specific restriction target sequences of each enzyme. Photoprotective activity of the extracts was evaluated in UVC-irradiated plasmids. None of the extracts displayed DNA protective effects in this assay. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics from Marine Sources)
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Open AccessArticle
Sensory Evaluation and Oxidative Stability of a Suncream Formulated with Thermal Spring Waters from Ourense (NW Spain) and Sargassum muticum Extracts
Cosmetics 2017, 4(2), 19; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics4020019 - 13 Jun 2017
Cited by 2
Abstract
The purpose of this work was to evaluate four thermal spring waters from Ourense and a Sargassum muticum extract as cosmetic ingredients for the preparation of a suncream. The thermal spring waters were tested for their suitability as an aqueous phase main component, [...] Read more.
The purpose of this work was to evaluate four thermal spring waters from Ourense and a Sargassum muticum extract as cosmetic ingredients for the preparation of a suncream. The thermal spring waters were tested for their suitability as an aqueous phase main component, and the algal extract was added as an antioxidant instead of using synthetic preservatives in the cosmetic formula. The emulsion was tested for lipid oxidation during a period of 9 months and for consumer acceptance by performing a sensory test on controls and blanks. Further, color parameters were considered, and a pH determination was performed. The S. muticum extract protected from primary and secondary oxidation as efficiently as Fucus sp. or α-tocopherol extracts. In addition, the sensorial test revealed that consumers preferred suncreams prepared with the S. muticum extract and with thermal spring water from O Tinteiro and A Chavasqueira. The pH of the suncreams varied with the selection of the ingredients, and no oscillations in colorimetric values were visually observed. Our results indicate that the algal extract and the thermal spring waters from Ourense are potential cosmetic ingredients, since they showed effectiveness as antioxidant ingredients, and the suncreams were well accepted by consumers. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics from Marine Sources)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
The Potential Use of Marine Microalgae and Cyanobacteria in Cosmetics and Thalassotherapy
Cosmetics 2017, 4(4), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics4040046 - 01 Nov 2017
Cited by 14
Abstract
The use of microalgae and cyanobacteria for nutritional purposes dates back thousands of years; during the last few decades, microalgae culture has improved to become one of the modern biotechnologies. This has allowed high amounts of algal biomass to be obtained for use [...] Read more.
The use of microalgae and cyanobacteria for nutritional purposes dates back thousands of years; during the last few decades, microalgae culture has improved to become one of the modern biotechnologies. This has allowed high amounts of algal biomass to be obtained for use in different applications. Currently, the global production of microalgae and cyanobacteria is predominately aimed at applications with high added value given that algal biomass contains pigments, proteins, essential fatty acids, polysaccharides, vitamins, and minerals, all of which are of great interest in the preparation of natural products, both as food and in cosmetics. Hence, the bioactive components from microalgae can be incorporated in cosmetic and cosmeceutical formulations, and can help achieve benefits including the maintenance of skin structure and function. Thalassotherapy involves using seawater and all related marine elements, including macroalgae, however, there has been limited use of microalgae. Microalgae and cyanobacteria could be incorporated into health and wellness treatments applied in thalassotherapy centers due to their high concentration of biologically active substances that are of interest in skin care. This paper briefly reviews the current and potential cosmetic and cosmeceutical applications of marine microalgae and cyanobacteria compounds and also recommends its use in thalassotherapy well-being treatments. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics from Marine Sources)
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Open AccessReview
Applications for Marine Resources in Cosmetics
Cosmetics 2017, 4(3), 35; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics4030035 - 15 Sep 2017
Cited by 11
Abstract
Marine resources represent an interesting source of active ingredients for the cosmetics industry. Algae (macro and micro) are rich in proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, vitamins (A, B, and C) and oligo-elements such as copper, iron and zinc. All those active principles play roles [...] Read more.
Marine resources represent an interesting source of active ingredients for the cosmetics industry. Algae (macro and micro) are rich in proteins, amino acids, carbohydrates, vitamins (A, B, and C) and oligo-elements such as copper, iron and zinc. All those active principles play roles in hydration, firming, slimming, shine and protection. Marine organisms inhabit a wide spectrum of habitats. Photo-protective compounds can be obtained from organisms subjected to strong light radiation, such as in tropical systems or in shallow water. In the same way, molecules with antioxidant potential can be obtained from microorganisms inhabiting extreme systems such as hydrothermal vents. For example, marine bacteria collected around deep-sea hydrothermal vents produce complex and innovative polysaccharides in the laboratory which are useful in cosmetics. There are many properties that will be put forward by the cosmetic industries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics from Marine Sources)
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Open AccessReview
Cosmeceuticals Properties of Sea Cucumbers: Prospects and Trends
Cosmetics 2017, 4(3), 26; https://doi.org/10.3390/cosmetics4030026 - 04 Aug 2017
Cited by 5
Abstract
Cosmeceutical, a new term in the cosmetic industry, refers to cosmetic products that contain active ingredients and have medicinal benefits. Cosmeceuticals have attracted increased attention because of their beneficial effects on human health. Sea cucumbers, belonging to the class Holothuroidea, marine invertebrates, are [...] Read more.
Cosmeceutical, a new term in the cosmetic industry, refers to cosmetic products that contain active ingredients and have medicinal benefits. Cosmeceuticals have attracted increased attention because of their beneficial effects on human health. Sea cucumbers, belonging to the class Holothuroidea, marine invertebrates, are rich in bioactive compounds, including saponin, chondroitin sulphate, collagen, amino acids, and phenols. These bioactive compounds have diverse functional roles as a secondary metabolite and these properties can be applied to the developments of novel cosmeceuticals. This review provides an overview the application of sea cucumber derivatives for cosmeceuticals. Further, prospects and trends of sea cucumber in cosmeceuticals industry were also discussed. The proper development of sea cucumber bioactive compounds will be helpful in cosmeceutical product development and industry. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Cosmetics from Marine Sources)
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