Surface Engineering Processes for Reducing Friction and Wear

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion, Wear and Erosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2024 | Viewed by 1446

Special Issue Editors


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Guest Editor
Department of Aeronautical Sciences, Hellenic Air Force Academy, Attika, Greece
Interests: materials science; surface engineering; manufacturing processes; tribology; mechanical properties; corrosion and oxidation
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Guest Editor
Department of Aeronautical Sciences, Hellenic Air Force Academy, Attika, Greece
Interests: materials science; surface engineering; manufacturing processes; tribology; mechanical properties; corrosion and oxidation

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Surface engineering is considered as a critical area in industrial manufacturing as the quality of surfaces strongly affects the functionality, efficiency and durability of technological processes and products. One of the main goals for surface modification is to reduce the adverse effects of friction and wear in wide range of engineering applications, such as biomedical, electrical, energy, transport, etc. However, due to the variability and diversity of these applications, diverse contact conditions and environments are met. Thus, in order to select and apply the most appropriate surface treatment, testing under relevant to the application conditions is needed.

Having the above in mind, this Special Issue focuses on the utilization of surface engineering processes to minimize friction and wear phenomena in engineering applications. The topics of interest for this Special Issue, in particular, include (but are not restricted to):

  • All existing surface processing technologies (e.g., coating deposition, laser treatments, ion implantation, etc.) for modifying materials;
  • Novel surface treatments and coatings;
  • Use of surface treatments to reduce wear and friction;
  • New tribological methods to study industrial problems on the lab scale;
  • Friction and wear mechanisms in surface modified systems;
  • Tribo-corrosion of surfaces;
  • Other aspects of tribological surfaces and coatings are also welcome.

Dr. Emmanuel P. Georgiou
Dr. Angelos Koutsomichalis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • surface engineering
  • coatings
  • materials processing
  • friction
  • wear
  • lubrication
  • tribo-testing
  • green tribology
  • sustainability

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

18 pages, 5752 KiB  
Article
Performance Evaluation of PVD and CVD Multilayer-Coated Tools in Machining High-Strength Steel
by Saima Yaqoob, Jaharah A. Ghani, Nabil Jouini and Afifah Z. Juri
Coatings 2024, 14(7), 865; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14070865 - 10 Jul 2024
Viewed by 295
Abstract
To curtail the negative effects of traditional flood machining, dry cutting using carbide tools has emerged as a prominent alternative for manufacturers, owing to its low cost and phenomenal surface qualities. In line with this view, high-speed machining of high-strength AISI 4340 alloy [...] Read more.
To curtail the negative effects of traditional flood machining, dry cutting using carbide tools has emerged as a prominent alternative for manufacturers, owing to its low cost and phenomenal surface qualities. In line with this view, high-speed machining of high-strength AISI 4340 alloy steel was carried out using multilayer Al2O3/TiCN-CVD and TiAlN/AlCrN-PVD carbide tools in a dry environment. The experimental scheme was adopted, as per Taguchi’s L18 orthogonal array, to investigate the two most crucial machinability aspects, namely tool life and surface roughness. An analysis of variance (ANOVA) was performed on the obtained data, and it was inferred that the feed rate exhibited the strongest effects on both the tool life and surface roughness, with corresponding percentage contributions of 46.22% and 68.96%, respectively. The longest tool lives of 14.75 min and 10.08 min were obtained at a low cutting speed and feed rate for CVD and PVD tools, respectively. However, the lowest surface roughness of 0.276 µm and 0.307 µm was achieved at a high cutting speed and low feed rate for PVD and CVD tools, respectively. The evolution of tool wear, studied through the microscopic images of the worn tools, revealed that a high cutting speed and feed rate accelerated the flank wear for both types of tools. Nevertheless, the CVD tool exhibited better results due to the thick and effective Al2O3/TiCN coating layer, which protected the carbide substrate against thermal–mechanical loads. Moreover, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) performed on the worn tools revealed that adhesion, oxidation, diffusion, and abrasion were the main wear mechanisms for both types of tools. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Engineering Processes for Reducing Friction and Wear)
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17 pages, 7144 KiB  
Article
Multi-Objective Optimization of Process Parameters in Laser DED Ni-Based Powder on Steel Rail Using Response Surface Design
by Juncai Li, Yue Yang, Liaoyuan Chen, Tianbiao Yu, Ji Zhao and Zixuan Wang
Coatings 2024, 14(4), 401; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings14040401 - 28 Mar 2024
Viewed by 839
Abstract
With the rise of global industrialization, the requirements for the operating speed and carrying capacity of high-speed trains are increasingly higher. Because the wear and tear of rails gradually increases during the running of high-speed trains, strengthening or repairing rail surfaces is of [...] Read more.
With the rise of global industrialization, the requirements for the operating speed and carrying capacity of high-speed trains are increasingly higher. Because the wear and tear of rails gradually increases during the running of high-speed trains, strengthening or repairing rail surfaces is of paramount significance. Laser-directed energy deposition (DED) exhibits significant advantages in improving surface hardness, corrosion resistance, and abrasion resistance. Because of the multiple interacting optimization objectives, the development of a multi-objective optimization method for process parameters is significant for improving DED deposition quality. Response surface design employs multivariate quadratic regression equations to fit the functional relationship between the factors and the responses, which can be employed to find the optimal process parameters and solve multivariate problems. This study develops a multi-objective optimization model with response surface design and 2D process mappings to visually analyze the effects of scanning speed, laser power, and powder feed rate on aspect ratio, dilution rate, and microhardness. The optimal combination of process parameters for Ni-based alloys on U71Mn rail is a laser power of 431 W, a scanning speed of 5.34 mm/s, and a powder feed rate of 1.03 r/min. In addition, a multi-physics field finite element model is developed to analyze the evolution mechanism of the microstructure from the bottom to the top of the single track. This study can provide theoretical and technical support for the surface strengthening or repair of U71Mn rail. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Surface Engineering Processes for Reducing Friction and Wear)
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