Special Issue "Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering"

A special issue of Coatings (ISSN 2079-6412). This special issue belongs to the section "Corrosion, Wear and Erosion".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 November 2020).

Special Issue Editor

Dr. Judit Telegdi
Website
Guest Editor
Research Centre for Natural Sciences, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Institute of Materials and Environmental Chemistry, 1117 Budapest, Magyar tudósok körútja 2., Hungary
Interests: corrosion; mechanisms of corrosion and corrosion inhibition; nanolayers against corrosion; self-healing and slow-release microsphers/microcapsules
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Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The aim of this Special Issue is to summarize and highlight the latest achievements in the literature, experimental work, and analytical techniques in the field of corrosion science connected with surface engineering. Though there have been good monographs, books, and articles on similar topics in the past, this issue will be dedicated to the recently developed as well as to the most often applied and paramount methods, techniques, and instrumentations that not only elucidate the corrosion phenomenon, its inhibition, as well as its kinetics but inform about proper surface engineering to decrease and control these undesired phenomena.

The corrosion phenomenon is well known all over the world; it merits far-flung scientific understanding. The scope of corrosion covers a wide range of phenomena: general corrosion, pitting and stress corrosion, cracking, passivity, high temperature oxidation (to mention only some of them), as well as their inhibition, with emphasis on the mechanisms and methods used to control the corrosion. In order to achieve successful results, the cooperation of scientists and industrial specialists is necessary.

Surface engineering, which is an important tool to modify the surface properties and the appearance (with no change in the bulk composition), to provide protection from environmental damage, to enhance mechanical and physical performance by modifications (coating, chemical and physical deposition, anodizing, thermal spraying, mechanical deformation, etc.), includes technologies that convert the very upper surface layer of the substrate that results in increased anticorrosion characteristics. The achieved altered properties depend on the techniques and parameters, on the surface characteristics, on the metal composition and microstructure, and the surface roughness.

The Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering Special Issue would like to inspire engineers, scientists, and specialists working on the topics mentioned above, who will contribute to this important topic with reports on their own work done in the field of corrosion, corrosion inhibition by special surface treatments, as well as in surface characterization. Review papers are also welcome.

We have to keep in mind that the environmental impact of chemicals could be significantly decreased, and the energy consumption and CO2 emission could also be decreased with special surface treatments.

Original papers and critical reviews are awaited in topics such as:

  • New appearance in general and localized corrosion, corrosion resistant alloys;
  • Principles and modes of corrosion inhibition by surface engineering;
  • Recently developed surface modification techniques (chemical, physical, electrochemical, etc.);
  • Newest results in surface coatings with microcapsules of self-healing and slow release activity;
  • Most effective characterization and testing of surfaces before and after modification.

Dr. Judit Telegdi
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Coatings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • corrosion inhibition
  • special surface engineering
  • coatings with molecular layers
  • self-healing and slow-release coatings
  • surface characterizetion techniques

Published Papers (13 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Corrosion Behavior of a Ni–Cr–Mo Alloy Coating Fabricated by Laser Cladding in a Simulated Sulfuric Acid Dew Point Corrosion Environment
Coatings 2020, 10(9), 849; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10090849 - 31 Aug 2020
Abstract
For this study, aimed at proposing a potential direction to prevent sulfuric acid dew point corrosion, a Ni–Cr–Mo alloy Hastelloy C22 coating was fabricated by coaxial laser cladding technology. The phase composition, microstructure, and corrosion behavior in a simulated sulfuric acid dew point [...] Read more.
For this study, aimed at proposing a potential direction to prevent sulfuric acid dew point corrosion, a Ni–Cr–Mo alloy Hastelloy C22 coating was fabricated by coaxial laser cladding technology. The phase composition, microstructure, and corrosion behavior in a simulated sulfuric acid dew point corrosion environment were investigated and compared with a Hastelloy C22 alloy, a titanium alloy TC4, and 09CrCuSb steel (ND). The results showed that the phase composition of the C22 coating is essentially similar to that of the C22 alloy, consisting of a γ-Ni solid solution and Ni6Mo6C1.06. The finer microstructure of the C22 coating mainly contains eutectic and dentrite, presenting a typical solidification feature of laser cladding. The corrosion resistance of the C22 coating is very close to that of the C22 alloy, and outclasses that of TC4 and ND. The corrosion behavior of the C22 coating is intergranular corrosion resulting from the segregation of molybdenum, chromium containing corrosion products, and smaller anode micro-batteries. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of Different Electrolyte Additives and Structural Characteristics of Plasma Electrolytic Oxidation Coatings on AZ31 Magnesium Alloy
Coatings 2020, 10(9), 817; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10090817 - 24 Aug 2020
Abstract
Coatings prepared by different electrolyte additives were investigated on AZ31 magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation. In this study, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were employed to assess the morphologies, chemical and phase compositions of the plasma electrolytic [...] Read more.
Coatings prepared by different electrolyte additives were investigated on AZ31 magnesium alloy by plasma electrolytic oxidation. In this study, scanning electron microscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis were employed to assess the morphologies, chemical and phase compositions of the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO) coatings, respectively. Furthermore, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy was used to evaluate the corrosion behavior of the composite coating. The investigation of the effect of electrolyte additives in the base electrolyte showed that the PEO specimens exhibit different surface and cross-sectional morphologies, and phase compositions. The results showed that SiO32− was conducive to the growth of the ceramic layer, and the ceramic layer developing in the electrolyte which contained AlO2 showed a typical double-layer structure. The corrosion resistance of coating formed in a phosphate bath was higher than that of the coating formed in silicate bath and coating formed in an aluminate bath. Moreover, the corrosion resistance of the coating formed in the fluoride bath was the highest. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Microstructure and Properties of Fe-Based Alloy Coating on Gray Cast Iron Fabricated Using Induction Cladding
Coatings 2020, 10(9), 801; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10090801 - 19 Aug 2020
Abstract
Gray cast iron is widely used for the cylinder bore of marine diesel engine. With the aim to improve the properties of the cylinder liner and maintain the matching ability with piston ring under the harsh working condition, the Fe-based alloy coating is [...] Read more.
Gray cast iron is widely used for the cylinder bore of marine diesel engine. With the aim to improve the properties of the cylinder liner and maintain the matching ability with piston ring under the harsh working condition, the Fe-based alloy coating is fabricated on the gray cast iron using induction cladding. Owing to the high carbon content in both coating and substrate materials, it is extremely difficult to control the coating process and the coating quality. The additive of welding flux and prolonged heating time is proposed to prepare good quality coating. The coating forming mechanism is investigated, and the electrochemical corrosion and tribological properties of the coating are examined. The results show that the Fe-based coating possess better corrosive and tribological performance than gray cast iron, and it is seemed to be a potential candidate for improving the performance of the cylinder liner. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Coating Deterioration and Underlying Metal Corrosion Processes in Water-Line Area: Role of DACs
Coatings 2020, 10(7), 684; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10070684 - 16 Jul 2020
Abstract
Water-line corrosion is a highly concentrated type of localized corrosion. The conventional single electrode method is limited in its ability to obtain the kinetic information of the corrosion occurrence and development processes. Herein, the coating deterioration and underlying metal corrosion processes in water-line [...] Read more.
Water-line corrosion is a highly concentrated type of localized corrosion. The conventional single electrode method is limited in its ability to obtain the kinetic information of the corrosion occurrence and development processes. Herein, the coating deterioration and underlying metal corrosion processes in water-line area were studied by a small wire beam electrode to monitor the current density distribution. The distance between each electrode was very small (interval: 0.3 mm), thus facilitating it to approach the practical metal component with a continuous surface. The results showed that cathodic and anodic sites tended to be weak points of the coating at the initial stage. With the continuous degradation of the coating, the cathodic zone tended to occur in the above the anodic zone due to the effect of differential aeration cells (DACs). Subsequently, the cathodic zone expanded to the waterline and the polarity reversed to the anodic zone, causing the coating to peel and blister continuously from the bottom up. When the cathodic zone extended to the gas phase area above the water line, this area became the strongest cathodic zone under the action of the thin liquid film, thus significantly accelerating the corrosion of the base metal at the bottom. The present study aims to achieve an in-depth understanding of coating deterioration and underlying metal corrosion processes in the water-line area, providing a new means of directly visualizing the role of DACs played in water line corrosion. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
High Temperature Corrosion Behaviors of 20G Steel, Hastelloy C22 Alloy and C22 Laser Coating under Reducing Atmosphere with H2S
Coatings 2020, 10(7), 617; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10070617 - 29 Jun 2020
Cited by 1
Abstract
High-temperature corrosion behaviors of 20G steel, Hastelloy C22 alloy and C22 laser coating was evaluated by corrosion mass gain measurements at 450 °C. The corrosive atmosphere is 0.2 vol% H2S–0.1 vol% O2–N2, which simulated the severe high-temperature [...] Read more.
High-temperature corrosion behaviors of 20G steel, Hastelloy C22 alloy and C22 laser coating was evaluated by corrosion mass gain measurements at 450 °C. The corrosive atmosphere is 0.2 vol% H2S–0.1 vol% O2–N2, which simulated the severe high-temperature corrosion environment occurred under low-NOx combustion in pulverized-coal furnaces. Experimental results showed that the corrosion resistance of the C22 laser coating and the C22 alloy was obviously better than 20G steel. Furthermore, it should be noted that the C22 laser coating fabricated in this study displayed a higher corrosion resistance than the commercial C22 alloy although they had the same chemical composition. The severe pitting corrosion was observed in 20G steel with the corrosion products consisting of FeS2, Fe2O3 and Fe3O4. The C22 alloy and C22 laser coating exhibited the uniform corrosion and their main corrosion products were NiS2, CrS and a small amount of chromium and manganese oxides. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Investigation of Corrosion Behavior of Epoxy Modified Silicate Zinc-Rich Coatings in 3.5% NaCl Solution
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 444; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050444 - 30 Apr 2020
Abstract
In order to develop waterborne silicate anticorrosive coatings to replace solvent-based anticorrosive coatings used widely in the shipping industry, epoxy modified silicate emulsions were synthesized with different contents of epoxy resin, then aqueous silicate zinc-rich coatings were prepared with the synthesized silicate emulsion, [...] Read more.
In order to develop waterborne silicate anticorrosive coatings to replace solvent-based anticorrosive coatings used widely in the shipping industry, epoxy modified silicate emulsions were synthesized with different contents of epoxy resin, then aqueous silicate zinc-rich coatings were prepared with the synthesized silicate emulsion, triethylamine, and zinc powder. The influence of the content of epoxy on the properties and chemical structure of the modified emulsion, mechanical properties of the silicate coatings, and corrosion behavior of the silicate zinc-rich coatings in 3.5% NaCl solution were investigated. The coating samples on steel were measured by the immersion test, Tafel polarization test, and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) test with different immersion times. The results showed that epoxy modified silicate emulsions were successfully synthesized. With the increase in epoxy content, the viscosity and solid content of the modified emulsion increased, the impact resistance of the silicate coating rose, the pencil hardness decreased, but the adhesion was not affected. Epoxy modification can reduce, to a certain extent, the corrosion driving force of the zinc rich coating and increase the impedance of the zinc-rich coating, which decreases with the increase of immersion time in 3.5% NaCl solution. With the increase in the epoxy content, the impedance value of the zinc-rich coating increases, indicating that the ability of the coating to resist corrosive media is enhanced. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Design of Corrosion Protective and Antistatic Hybrid Sol-Gel Coatings on 6XXX AlMgSi Alloys for Aerospace Application
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 441; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050441 - 30 Apr 2020
Abstract
An inorganic–organic coating based on glycidyl-functionalized silica and zirconia was synthesized by sol-gel technology to protect three types of AlMgSi (6XXX series) alloys against corrosion in aerospace applications. Different parameters such as the solid content, the organic/inorganic ratio of the sols and the [...] Read more.
An inorganic–organic coating based on glycidyl-functionalized silica and zirconia was synthesized by sol-gel technology to protect three types of AlMgSi (6XXX series) alloys against corrosion in aerospace applications. Different parameters such as the solid content, the organic/inorganic ratio of the sols and the deposition conditions were studied with the aim to achieve a tradeoff between the corrosion protection, antistatic performance and low vacuum-induced outgassing. Those parameters directly influence the thickness and the density of the coatings, and therefore the barrier effect against corrosion and the contact electrical resistance, which are affected in opposite ways. To obtain a low contact electrical resistance, silver nanowires (NW) with a high aspect ratio were loaded in the sol-gel matrix with the aim to create a conductive path through the hybrid coating with a low concentration of NWs. The coatings were adapted for AA6063, AA6061 and AA6082, and they all showed an outstanding anti-corrosion performance in different artificial weathering tests, whereas electrochemical impedance spectroscopy permitted the identification of the most critical parameters affecting water uptake. An antistatic performance was demonstrated by the low contact electrical resistance of the coated AA6061 and AA6063 alloys, although the incorporation of NWs showed a detrimental effect on the corrosion protection compared with the unloaded coating. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessEditor’s ChoiceArticle
Study of a Hydrogen Inhibition Method with Sodium Tungstate for Wet Aluminum Dust Removal Systems
Coatings 2020, 10(5), 431; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10050431 - 28 Apr 2020
Abstract
Hydrogen, which can be produced due to the accumulation of aluminum dust that reacts with water in wet dust removal systems, is a fire and explosion hazard. To reduce hydrogen production, sodium tungstate is used in hydrogen inhibition experiments to inhibit the reaction [...] Read more.
Hydrogen, which can be produced due to the accumulation of aluminum dust that reacts with water in wet dust removal systems, is a fire and explosion hazard. To reduce hydrogen production, sodium tungstate is used in hydrogen inhibition experiments to inhibit the reaction between aluminum dust and water. The purity of the aluminum powder was 95.15%, analyzed with X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF). Each of the hydrogen inhibition experiments lasted for 12 h. In addition, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the surface morphology and composition of particles before and after the experiments. There was nearly no hydrogen produced when the concentration of the sodium tungstate solution reached 100 g/L. The results show that a protective coating containing W element was formed on the surface of the aluminum particles after the reaction with sodium tungstate, and the coating prevented the aluminum particles from contacting with water. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
The Effect of the Methyl and Ethyl Group of the Acrylate Precursor in Hybrid Silane Coatings Used for Corrosion Protection of Aluminium Alloy 7075-T6
Coatings 2020, 10(2), 172; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings10020172 - 13 Feb 2020
Cited by 4
Abstract
This study investigated polysiloxane hybrid sol-gel coatings synthesized from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MAPTMS) and two different precursors, i.e., methyl- or ethyl- methacrylate (MMA or EMA), as corrosion protection of aluminium alloy 7075-T6. The hypothesis was that the additional alkyl group might [...] Read more.
This study investigated polysiloxane hybrid sol-gel coatings synthesized from tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS), 3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl methacrylate (MAPTMS) and two different precursors, i.e., methyl- or ethyl- methacrylate (MMA or EMA), as corrosion protection of aluminium alloy 7075-T6. The hypothesis was that the additional alkyl group might affect the chemical properties and, consequently, the corrosion properties. Synthesis of the sols proceeded in two steps, each involving either MMA or EMA in the same molar ratio. The resulting sols, siloxane-(poly(methyl methacrylate-co-MAPTMS)) or siloxane-(poly(ethyl methacrylate-co-MAPTMS)), were applied on aluminium alloy followed by characterization in terms of chemical structure and composition, topography, wettability, adhesion and corrosion resistance in 0.1 M sodium chloride solution. The chemical properties of sols, monoliths and coatings were investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectrometry, solid state nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Coatings were similar in terms of surface topography, while the wettability of the coating with EMA showed 6° greater water contact angle compared to the coating with MMA. Both coatings were shown, by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy in 0.1 M NaCl solution, to act as barriers to protect the underlying substrate in which coating with EMA exhibits better protection properties after 2 months of immersion. Adhesion tests confirmed the highest grade of adhesion to the substrate for both coatings. Testing in a salt-spray chamber demonstrated excellent corrosion protection, where coatings remaining intact after more than 600 h of exposure. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
The Influence of Glass Flake and Micaceous Iron Oxide on Electrochemical Corrosion Performance of Waterborne Silicate Coatings in 3.5% NaCl Solution
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 833; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120833 - 06 Dec 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
Waterborne silicate composite coatings were prepared to replace existing solvent-based coatings for ships. A series of complex coatings were prepared by adding anticorrosive pigments to the silicate resin. Adhesion, pencil hardness, and impact resistance were investigated, and corrosion performance in 3.5% NaCl solution [...] Read more.
Waterborne silicate composite coatings were prepared to replace existing solvent-based coatings for ships. A series of complex coatings were prepared by adding anticorrosive pigments to the silicate resin. Adhesion, pencil hardness, and impact resistance were investigated, and corrosion performance in 3.5% NaCl solution was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The results show that adhesion and impact resistance are high, and that pencil hardness can reach 4H. The curing mechanism for the coatings were investigated by Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The mechanism of curing reaction in the studied waterborne silicate paint was found to be different from that reported in the literature. When the coatings were immersed in 3.5% NaCl solution for 8 h, there is only one time constant in the Bode plot, and coating capacitance (Qc) gradually increases while coating resistance (Rc) gradually decreases. Glass flake composite coatings have better corrosion resistance by comprehensive comparison of Qc and Rc. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Synthesis and Characterization of Ni–W/Cr2O3 Nanocomposite Coatings Using Electrochemical Deposition Technique
Coatings 2019, 9(12), 815; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9120815 - 02 Dec 2019
Cited by 8
Abstract
Ni–W/Cr2O3 nanocomposite coatings were synthesized from aqueous sulphate-citrate electrolyte containing Cr2O3 nanoparticles on a steel surface using conventional electrodeposition technique. This study was aimed at investigating the influence of Cr2O3 nanoparticle content on the [...] Read more.
Ni–W/Cr2O3 nanocomposite coatings were synthesized from aqueous sulphate-citrate electrolyte containing Cr2O3 nanoparticles on a steel surface using conventional electrodeposition technique. This study was aimed at investigating the influence of Cr2O3 nanoparticle content on the microstructure, corrosion resistance, and mechanical properties of electrodeposited Ni–W/Cr2O3 nanocomposite coatings. Ni–W binary alloy coatings were deposited and optimized before addition of the nanoparticles to produce high-quality coatings. The microstructure and chemical composition of the Ni–W/Cr2O3 nanocomposite coatings were evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), and XRD. Corrosion resistance properties were evaluated using potentiodynamic polarization (Tafel) measurements in 3.5 wt.% NaCl medium. The corrosion resistance and microhardness are significantly higher in Ni–W/Cr2O3 nanocomposite coatings compared to pure Ni–W binary alloy and increase with the increase in content of Cr2O3 nanoparticles in the coatings. Wear resistance is also higher in Ni–W/Cr2O3 nanocomposite coatings. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Magnetite-Accelerated Corrosion of SA508 Tubesheet Material and Its Effect on Steam Generator Tube Denting
Coatings 2019, 9(9), 575; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9090575 - 09 Sep 2019
Abstract
The objective of this work is to investigate the magnetite-accelerated corrosion phenomenon of SA508 used as tubesheet material in simulated secondary side environments of pressurized water reactors through immersion and electrochemical tests. The presence of sulfate ions induced the fast growth of a [...] Read more.
The objective of this work is to investigate the magnetite-accelerated corrosion phenomenon of SA508 used as tubesheet material in simulated secondary side environments of pressurized water reactors through immersion and electrochemical tests. The presence of sulfate ions induced the fast growth of a corrosion product layer on SA508, and this phenomenon was accelerated when the SA508 was coupled to magnetite. From the perspective of electrochemical behavior, it was found that SA508 behaves as an anodic member in the coupling system with magnetite, resulting in an increased corrosion rate. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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Open AccessArticle
Influence of LBE Temperatures on the Microstructure and Properties of Crystalline and Amorphous Multiphase Ceramic Coatings
Coatings 2019, 9(9), 543; https://doi.org/10.3390/coatings9090543 - 24 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
An Al2O3–TiO2 amorphous composite coating with a thickness of 100–120 μm was fabricated on China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM steel) by oxygen acetylene flame spraying technology and the laser in-situ reaction method. We investigated the microstructures and [...] Read more.
An Al2O3–TiO2 amorphous composite coating with a thickness of 100–120 μm was fabricated on China low activation martensitic steel (CLAM steel) by oxygen acetylene flame spraying technology and the laser in-situ reaction method. We investigated the microstructures and mechanical properties of the coating after liquid lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE) alloy corrosion under different temperatures for 300 h and found that the corrosion temperature of the LBE had no observable effect on the microstructure and chemical phase of the Al2O3–TiO2 amorphous composite coatings. However, the mechanical properties (micro-hardness and shear strength) of the Al2O3–TiO2 multiphase coating deteriorated slightly with the increase in the immersion temperature of the LBE. As a result of oxygen acetylene flame spraying and laser in-situ reaction technology, it was found that the Al2O3–TiO2 amorphous composite coating exhibits an excellent LBE corrosion resistance, which is a candidate structural material for the accelerator-driven subcritical system (ADS) to handle nuclear waste under extreme conditions. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Corrosion Science and Surface Engineering)
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