Special Issue "Integrative Medicine in Pediatric Oncology"

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Oncology and Hematology".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 October 2018).

Special Issue Editors

Dr. Tracey F. Jubelirer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
1. Divison of Oncology, The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia
2. University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, 3400 Civic Center Blvd, Philadelphia, PA 19406, United States
Interests: integrative medicine; supportive care; nutrition; pediatric oncology
Dr. Susan F. Sencer
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Cancer and Blood Disorders, Children's Minnesota, 2525 Chicago Ave, Minneapolis, MN 55404, USA
Interests: pediatric oncology; integrative oncology; supportive care; supplements; mucositis; nausea; leukemia

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Integrative oncology (IO) is a patient-centered and interdisciplinary specialty that blends complementary therapies and conventional oncology treatment, in order to promote health and wellness, improve symptom control, alleviate distress and reduce suffering. 

The field of pediatric integrative oncology, while still somewhat in its infancy, is burgeoning. Not only are patients and their families demanding access to and knowledge of integrative medicine, but the field is also rich with opportunity for research exploration and discovery. It has been well documented in the literature that children and adolescents with cancer use integrative or complementary and alternative medicines (CAM) in conjunction with conventional therapies. While more is being published regarding the use of integrative therapies in oncology, the literature is sparse on quality research in pediatric oncology with a significant gap compared with our adult counterparts.  

The goal of this Special Issue is to discuss the state of the science in the field of integrative oncology, focusing on advancements in clinical care, education, training and research. Pre-clinical research findings are particularly encouraged. Both reviews and original research will be considered for publication. We encourage submissions from multidisciplinary sources, which reflects the breadth of individuals currently working in the field of pediatric integrative oncology.

Dr. Tracey F. Jubelirer
Dr. Susan F. Sencer
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Children is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Pediatric cancer
  • Integrative oncology
  • Integrative medicine
  • Complementary and alternative medicine
  • Supportive care
  • Symptom management

Published Papers (4 papers)

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Research

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Article
Medical Cannabis Certification in a Large Pediatric Oncology Center
Children 2019, 6(6), 79; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6060079 - 17 Jun 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 3577
Abstract
In Minnesota, medical cannabis was approved for use in 2014. From July 2015 to February 2019, our center certified 103 pediatric and young adult patients for the use of medical cannabis under the qualifying conditions of cancer and treatment-related symptoms. Here, we provide [...] Read more.
In Minnesota, medical cannabis was approved for use in 2014. From July 2015 to February 2019, our center certified 103 pediatric and young adult patients for the use of medical cannabis under the qualifying conditions of cancer and treatment-related symptoms. Here, we provide a review of the literature on medical cannabis use in pediatric and young adult cancer patients. We also provide demographic data on our patients certified for medical cannabis. The most common diagnoses were leukemia/lymphoma (36%), brain tumors (37%), and malignant solid tumors (26%). The most common indications were chemotherapy-related nausea, pain, and cancer cachexia. The age range at certification was 1.4–28.7 years (median 15.3 years). The time from cancer diagnosis to certification ranged from 0.5–197 months (median 8.9 months). The majority (94%) were certified during their first line of treatment. In the 32 patients who died from recurrent or progressive cancer, the time from certification to death was 1.3–30.3 months (median 4.4 years). Despite requesting certification, a subset (24%) never had medical cannabis dispensed. In our experience, pediatric and young adult oncology patients are interested in medical cannabis to help manage treatment-related symptoms. Ongoing analysis of this data will identify the therapeutic efficacy of medical cannabis. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrative Medicine in Pediatric Oncology)
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Article
Observational Study of Pediatric Inpatient Pain, Nausea/Vomiting and Anxiety
Children 2019, 6(5), 65; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6050065 - 03 May 2019
Cited by 2 | Viewed by 3058
Abstract
Background: The prevalence and severity of pain, nausea/vomiting, and anxiety (PNVA) among hospitalized children is not well established. We describe the prevalence and severity of PNVA among hospitalized patients from oncology, general pediatrics, and cardiology services in a tertiary care center. Methods: Patients [...] Read more.
Background: The prevalence and severity of pain, nausea/vomiting, and anxiety (PNVA) among hospitalized children is not well established. We describe the prevalence and severity of PNVA among hospitalized patients from oncology, general pediatrics, and cardiology services in a tertiary care center. Methods: Patients were recruited on admission and enrolled if their caregiver consented, spoke English, and were anticipated to stay 2–30 days. Symptoms were measured weekdays using age-validated tools. PNVA symptoms were described and compared. Results: We enrolled 496 (49.4%) patients of 1005 admitted. Patients were predominantly Caucasian (57.9%) on their first admission (53.6%). The average (SD) age was 8.6 years (5.9) in oncology, 4.2 (5.3) in general pediatrics and 2.6 (4.0) in cardiology. 325 (65.6%) patients reported anxiety, 275 (55.4%) reported nausea and 256 (52.0%) reported pain. Mean (SD) severity out of 10 was 3.7 (2.5) for anxiety, 3.2 (2.1) for nausea and 3.0 (1.5) for pain. Prevalence of PNVA was no different between clinical programs, but pain (p = 0.008) and nausea (p = 0.006) severity were. PNVA symptom co-occurrence was positively correlated (p < 0.001). Conclusions: Anxiety was the most common and severe symptom for hospitalized children. Patients in oncology demonstrated the least severe pain and nausea with no difference in anxiety between services. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrative Medicine in Pediatric Oncology)
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Article
Children Are Born to Dance! Pediatric Medical Dance/Movement Therapy: The View from Integrative Pediatric Oncology
Children 2019, 6(1), 14; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6010014 - 21 Jan 2019
Cited by 4 | Viewed by 9470
Abstract
Children freely expressing themselves through spontaneous dance is a natural part of childhood. The healing powers of dance are universal in all cultures across history. Dance/movement therapy (DMT) in pediatric oncology is little known and underutilized. This article discusses DMT, specifically focusing on [...] Read more.
Children freely expressing themselves through spontaneous dance is a natural part of childhood. The healing powers of dance are universal in all cultures across history. Dance/movement therapy (DMT) in pediatric oncology is little known and underutilized. This article discusses DMT, specifically focusing on pediatric oncology. It defines and clarifies the difference between medical DMT as a psychotherapeutic modality aimed at addressing the patient’s psychosocial needs, and dance and therapeutic dance used recreationally to engage patients during their hospital visits. A literature review of DMT with medically ill children in the United States and worldwide is provided. It culminates with a focus on advancements in the field, discussing the future of pediatric medical DMT. Grounded in a biopsychosocial perspective, the intrinsically nonverbal and embodied nature of pediatric medical DMT is uniquely positioned to be a strong component of integrative oncology services. The use of DMT to synthesize potentially traumatic aspects of the medical experience is proposed. It ends with a call for research posing the question: Can pediatric medical DMT support the patient to express feelings while in cancer treatment within the context of a psychotherapeutic milieu, enabling the patient to create an embodied coherent narrative that fosters expressivity and empowerment? Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrative Medicine in Pediatric Oncology)
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Review

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Review
The Power of Massage in Children with Cancer—How Can We Do Effective Research?
Children 2019, 6(1), 13; https://doi.org/10.3390/children6010013 - 18 Jan 2019
Viewed by 3575
Abstract
Children with cancer experience multiple troubling symptoms. Massage offers a safe, non-pharmacological approach to address these symptoms. Numerous studies of massage in children and adults with cancer have been performed, yet most are unable to demonstrate significant benefit. This review aims to summarize [...] Read more.
Children with cancer experience multiple troubling symptoms. Massage offers a safe, non-pharmacological approach to address these symptoms. Numerous studies of massage in children and adults with cancer have been performed, yet most are unable to demonstrate significant benefit. This review aims to summarize what we know about the role of massage and sets goals and challenges for future massage research. This paper descriptively reviews the existing literature available in PubMed (both prior reviews and select papers) and the holes in prior research studies. Prior research on massage has been limited by small sample size/insufficient power, inappropriate outcome measures or timing, heterogeneous patient populations, inconsistent intervention techniques, and other design flaws. Based on the findings and limitations of previous work, numerous suggestions are made for future studies to increase the potency of findings, including thoughts about appropriate dosing, control groups, type of intervention, outcome measures, patient selection, feasibility, and statistics. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Integrative Medicine in Pediatric Oncology)
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