Language Acquisition and Language Impairment in Children with and without Neurodevelopmental Disorders

A special issue of Children (ISSN 2227-9067). This special issue belongs to the section "Pediatric Neurology & Neurodevelopmental Disorders".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 15 July 2024 | Viewed by 958

Special Issue Editor


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Guest Editor
Child Language Doctoral Program (CLDP), Kansas University, Lawrence, KS, USA
Interests: molecular basis of speech and language-related disorders; family-based genetic studies; stuttering; specific language impairment; developmental language disorder; gene mapping; next-generation DNA sequencing

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Language is innate to humans—and mastery of this ability is achieved by young children. However, language does not develop typically in some individuals, interfering with communication and, ultimately, with learning and academics. Language impairment can affect a child’s reading, writing, and speaking, leading to lifelong consequences. Language abilities can be impaired in the absence of disorders such as hearing impairment, intellectual disability, and autism spectrum disorder; sometimes, language impairment is comorbid with them. There is great complexity in understanding neural networks and the genetic factors in language acquisition. Twin studies have demonstrated significant heritability estimates (up to 0.92), suggesting genetics play a vital role in language acquisition in children. Family studies indicate an accumulation of language impairment in related individuals, and advanced genetic tools have begun to present genes associated with language impairment. The causes of language impairment are largely unknown, with solid agreement with regard to the involvement of biological and neuronal factors. This Special Issue aims to capture various approaches to understanding language development in children and their molecular and neural studies. We also welcome basic and translational research in this area of study.

Dr. Muhammad Hashim Raza
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Keywords

  • language acquisition in children
  • psycholinguistics in language acquisition in children
  • specific language impairment
  • developmental language disorder
  • language development in children with autism
  • genetics
  • longitudinal studies
  • family-based and case–control studies
  • behavioral studies
  • intervention or translational studies
  • social and developmental issues in children with language impairment

Published Papers (1 paper)

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Review

9 pages, 3016 KiB  
Review
Identifying Language Development in Children with ADHD: Differential Challenges, Interventions, and Collaborative Strategies
by Dimitra V. Katsarou, Efthymia Efthymiou, Georgios A. Kougioumtzis, Maria Sofologi and Maria Theodoratou
Children 2024, 11(7), 841; https://doi.org/10.3390/children11070841 - 10 Jul 2024
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Abstract
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) significantly influences children’s language acquisition and usage. This theoretical study explores the multifaceted impact of ADHD on language development, specifically focusing on reading and writing challenges. Existing research reveals that approximately 30% of children with ADHD show significant [...] Read more.
Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) significantly influences children’s language acquisition and usage. This theoretical study explores the multifaceted impact of ADHD on language development, specifically focusing on reading and writing challenges. Existing research reveals that approximately 30% of children with ADHD show significant delays in reading proficiency. Additionally, about 40% of these children struggle with phonological processing, which directly impacts their reading and writing skills. Interventions targeting executive function training combined with phonics-based instruction have been shown to significantly improve language outcomes. This study introduces a comprehensive framework connecting these challenges to specific interventions and collaborative strategies, emphasizing the importance of a multi-disciplinary approach. This work provides perspectives on the specific connections between ADHD symptoms and language difficulties, offering detailed potential solutions based on empirical data. Moreover, it features the necessity of adopting integrated intervention strategies to advance academic outcomes and communicative competencies for children with ADHD, providing new understandings into effective educational practices. Full article
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