Special Issue "Advances in Nanocomposite Luminescent Sensors"

A special issue of Chemosensors (ISSN 2227-9040). This special issue belongs to the section "Optical Chemical Sensors".

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 May 2023 | Viewed by 1408

Special Issue Editor

Prof. Dr. Sofian Kanan
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Biology, Chemistry and Environmental Sciences, American University of Sharjah, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
Interests: relationship between the molecular surface chemistry and macroscopic properties of materials

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nanocomposite materials exhibit different properties from both individual atoms and bulk properties in a material.  Understanding both physical and chemical characteristics of the materials lead to fabricating various luminescent nanocomposites with enriched host-guest features tailored for the detection of various chemical and biological samples.  Because of the variety of the topics covered on luminescent nanocomposites in terms of pore structure with designed morphology, compositional variations, surface properties and functionalities, there is a great deal of interests in materials modification to tailor unique and stable luminescent sensors for industrial, environmental, and biomedical applications. 

We invite active scientists and engineers with research interest focused on nanocomposite materials as luminescent probes to contribute to this special issue with original research papers, short communications, and critical reviews.

Prof. Dr. Sofian Kanan
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All submissions that pass pre-check are peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Chemosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 2000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • luminescent sensors
  • nanocomposites
  • fluorophores
  • guest-host
  • nanoparticles
  • luminescent chemosensors
  • biosensing and bioimaging
  • metal ion detection
  • cell tracking

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

Article
A Europium-Based Optical Sensor for the Detection of Carbon Dioxide and Its Application for a Fermentation Reaction
Chemosensors 2023, 11(1), 5; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors11010005 - 21 Dec 2022
Viewed by 529
Abstract
A new europium-based complex, K[Eu(hfa)4] with hfa = hexafluoroacetylacetonate is synthesized and its structure confirmed via X-ray crystallography. The structure unravels an anionic octa-coordinate complex, K[Eu(hfa)4], as opposed to the neutral hexacoordinate complex Eu(hfa)3 routinely/ubiquitously presumed to be [...] Read more.
A new europium-based complex, K[Eu(hfa)4] with hfa = hexafluoroacetylacetonate is synthesized and its structure confirmed via X-ray crystallography. The structure unravels an anionic octa-coordinate complex, K[Eu(hfa)4], as opposed to the neutral hexacoordinate complex Eu(hfa)3 routinely/ubiquitously presumed to be the case in the literature. The complex displayed pH-dependent, “on–off” emission changes in solution and exhibited a pKa of 6.13 ± 0.06 in ethylene glycol. In solution, the sensor complex exhibited drastic variation in emission intensity corresponding to changes in the concentration of CO2 gas purged. Based on multiple purge cycles of N2 and CO2, the emission intensity changes can be correlated to the concentration of CO2 in the solution. The sensor’s ability to quantify the CO2 presence is based on emission variations of the 5D07F2 line in the Eu(III) complex at 618 nm. The sensor exhibits a linear response to CO2 concentrations in the range of 0–25% (0–8.50 mM or 0–189.95 mmHg). Based on calibration data, the limit of detection (LOD) is determined to be 0.57% (0.19 mM or 4.33 mmHg) in solution. The I100/I0 ratio is determined to be 80.29 ± 3.79. The percent change in intensity from purging N2 to 100% CO2 is 7911.16%. Over the course of seven cycles of purging different concentrations of CO2, there is essentially no deviation in the emission intensity of the sensor in solution, indicating stability and reversibility. In addition to the analytical characterization of the sensor, the mechanism of CO2 sensing is investigated using cyclic voltammetry, IR, and Raman spectroscopy. These data indicate the reduction of europium(III) to europium(II) in an alkaline medium and suggest changes in the hfa ligand chemistry (association/dissociation and protonation) due to CO2 purging. The potential use of the sensor complex for real-life applications is herein evaluated via a well-known fermentation reaction. The CO2 generated during yeast’s anaerobic respiration in sucrose media is quantified using the sensor complex and a calibrated, commercial CO2 probe; both exhibit similar CO2 concentration values, validating the calibration curve and the viability of the complex as a bona fide sensor. Based on the data collected, a highly stable, brightly red-emissive Eu(III) complex with the ability to differentiate concentrations of CO2 in solution is hereby developed and characterized with benefits for various CO2 sensing applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanocomposite Luminescent Sensors)
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Article
Detecting CdSe Nanomaterials with a Fluorescent Schiff Base Ligand
Chemosensors 2022, 10(10), 394; https://doi.org/10.3390/chemosensors10100394 - 28 Sep 2022
Viewed by 624
Abstract
We investigated the easily synthesized ligand H3L as a fluorescent chemosensor for the detection of CdSe nanoparticles (CdSe NPs) and L-cysteine-capped CdSe quantum dots (CdSe-Cys QDs) in ethanol–water samples. A drastic quenching of the fluorescence emission of H3L at [...] Read more.
We investigated the easily synthesized ligand H3L as a fluorescent chemosensor for the detection of CdSe nanoparticles (CdSe NPs) and L-cysteine-capped CdSe quantum dots (CdSe-Cys QDs) in ethanol–water samples. A drastic quenching of the fluorescence emission of H3L at 510 nm occurred, as a result of the addition of CdSe NPs and CdSe-Cys QDs. A solution of H3L (1.26 ppb) showed sensitive responses to both CdSe NPs and CdSe-Cys QDs, with limits of detection (LOD) as low as 40 and 62 ppb, respectively. Moreover, using a smartphone color recognizer application, the fluorescence intensity response of H3L-modified cellulose paper to CdSe-Cys QDs was recorded on a red channel (R), which allowed us to detect CdSe-Cys QDs with LOD = 15 ppb. Interference of some common metal nanomaterials (NMs), as well as metal ions, in the determination of CdSe NMs in solution was studied. The affinity of H3L to CdSe NPs and CdSe-Cys QDs was spectroscopically determined. Scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM/EDX), micro-X-ray fluorescence (µ-XRF), 1H-NMR, attenuated total reflection infrared spectroscopy (ATR-IR), and density functional theory (DFT) were also used to investigate the interaction of H3L with CdSe NMs. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Nanocomposite Luminescent Sensors)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Quantum dots and their nanocomposites as highly sensitive fluorescent sensors for detection of heavy metal ions and toxic pesticides
Authors: Yude Wang
Affiliation: Ynunnan University
Abstract: Quantum dots-based nanomaterials have attracted extensive interests in fluorescence chemical sensors due to excellent luminescence characters, quantum size effect and interface effect, etc. Moreover, the fascinating properties with respect to good chemistry stability, rich surface ion species and wide ligand selectivity are also beneficial to improving the quality of quantum dots. The surface chemistry of fluorescent quantum dots has encouraged the development of multiple probes based on linked various functional groups. In recent years, quantum dots-based nanomaterials have been considered as the preferred sensing materials to efficiently detecting heavy metal ions and toxic pesticides by interacting with various analytes, which shows excellent sensitivity, selectivity, anti-interference as well as reduces the cost of equipment compared with traditional measured methods In this review article, the fundamental principles including the synthesis methods, application filed and sensing mechanism of semiconductor quantum dots and carbon-based quantum dots have been comprehensively discussed. We presented the application of semiconductor QDs, CQDs, GQDs and their nanocomposites as sensors detailly and focused on the properties of various quantum dots to heavy metal ion and toxic pesticides. The latest advances and application perspective of fluorescent sensors based on quantum dots and their nanocomposites are also proposed.

Title: Development of a nanosensor for the evaluation of scale inhibitors and quantification of fouling ions
Authors: Rafael S. Fernandes; , Amanda M. Caldas; Bruno B. Castro; Rosangela C. Balabana
Affiliation: aInstitute of Chemistry, Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte – UFRN, Natal – RN, Brazil bLeopoldo Américo Miguêz de Mello Research and Development Center – CENPES/PETROBRAS – Rio de Janeiro – RJ, Brazil.
Abstract: In this work, pyrophosphate-modified silver nanoparticles (NPs Ag) were developed for evaluation of polymeric scale inhibitor (carboxymethylcellulose–CMC) and quantification of scale ions (Ca2+, Mg2+). These functionalized nanoparticles have an absorption band in the visible region, with maximum intensity at 406 nm, which can change in the presence of the inhibitor or the fouling ions. The evaluation of Ag NPs response to fouling ions demonstrated that the addition of these ions significantly reduces the intensity of the absorption band. Furthermore, it was observed that the absorption intensity decreases linearly with the concentration of these ions. The response of NPs Ag to the scale inhibitor was evaluated from the regeneration of the absorption signal. When adding scale inhibitor to the mixture NPs Ag + fouling ion (reduced absorption band) it was observed that the signal had been regenerated.

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