Special Issue "State-of-the-Art Catalytical Technology in South Korea"

A special issue of Catalysts (ISSN 2073-4344).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: 30 November 2019.

Special Issue Editors

Guest Editor
Prof. Young Dok Kim Website E-Mail
Department of Chemistry, Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon 440-746, Korea
Interests: surface analyses; heterogeneous catalysis; CO2 conversion; adsorption; oxidation of volatile organic compounds; atomic layer deposition; polymer thin films
Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francis Verpoort Website E-Mail
1. Center for Environmental and Energy Research (CEER), Ghent University Global Campus, 119 Songdomunhwa-Ro, Yeonsu-Gu, Incheon, 406-840 South Korea
2. Lab of Organometallics, Catalysis and Ordered Materials (LOCOM) State Key Lab of Advanced Technology for Material Synthesis and Processing Wuhan University of Technology, 122 Luo she Road, Wuhan, 430070, PR China
Interests: organometallic material chemistry, homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysts, MOFs and MOPs, water splitting, olefin metathesis and its applications

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

South Korea has become an important country in the field of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis, including but not limited to catalysts for chemical synthesis, the biorefinery process, environmental remediation, and sustainable-energy devices such as fuel cells. This Special Issue welcomes both review and original research articles on all aspects of heterogeneous and homogeneous catalysis with an emphasis on fundamental and applied research implemented across South Korea. Topics include, but are not limited to, the following:

  • Air treatment;
  • Water/wastewater treatment and disinfection;
  • Catalytic reactions relevant to fuel cells;
  • Catalysts related to the biorefinery process;
  • Homogeneous and heterogeneous catalysis for organic synthesis;
  • Green synthesis using solar photochemistry and photocatalysis;
  • Photocatalytic hybrid-systems;
  • Photocatalytic, photochemical, and photosynthetic systems for H2 production and CO2 utilization;
  • Carbon dioxide reforming;
  • New materials for all types of  heterogeneously catalyzed reactions;
  • Operando spectroscopy for identifying catalytically active sites;

Although papers should report on trends and advances in the field of catalysis across South Korea; collaborative work between South Korean and non-South Korean partners is also welcome.

Prof. Young Dok Kim
Prof. Dr. Francis Verpoort
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Catalysts is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1600 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Oxidation of volatile organic compounds 
  • Selective catalytic reduction 
  • Wastewater treatment 
  • Pollution abatement 
  • Solar photocatalysis
  • Fenton process 
  • Photosynthesis 
  • Energy 
  • Biorefinery process 
  • Partial oxidation 
  • Nitrogen activation 
  • Solar-to-fuel process 
  • Carbon dioxide 
  • Hydrogen production 
  • Nanomaterials 
  • Operando spectroscopy

Published Papers (2 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle
Electrochemical Analysis of Aqueous Benzalkonium Chloride Micellar Solution and Its Mediated Electrocatalytic De-Chlorination Application
Catalysts 2019, 9(1), 99; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9010099 - 17 Jan 2019
Abstract
The physicochemical properties of biologically important benzalkonium chlorides (BKCs) and the effects of its structure on the de-chlorination of allyl chloride was studied by electrogenerated [Co(I)(bipyridine)3]+ (Co(I)) using an electrochemical technique. The results of [Co(II)(bipyridine)3]2+ (Co(II)) cyclic [...] Read more.
The physicochemical properties of biologically important benzalkonium chlorides (BKCs) and the effects of its structure on the de-chlorination of allyl chloride was studied by electrogenerated [Co(I)(bipyridine)3]+ (Co(I)) using an electrochemical technique. The results of [Co(II)(bipyridine)3]2+ (Co(II)) cyclic voltammetry in the presence of BKC demonstrates Co(II)/Co(III) redox couple for physicochemical analysis of BKC and Co(II)/Co(I) redox couple for catalytic application. Cyclic voltammetry over a range of scan rates and BKC concentrations revealed the BKC-bound Co(II)/Co(III) micelles showed that the identification of cmc and association of the probe Co(II) species, associated more in the hydrophobic region. In addition, change in diffusion coefficient value of Co(II)/Co(III) with BKC concentration demonstrates the association of Co(II) in micellar hydrophobic region. The beneficial effects of BKC could be accounted for by considering the benzyl headgroup-Co (II) precatalyst-volatile organic compounds (VOCs) (allyl chloride here) substrate interaction. Chromatography/mass spectroscopy (GC/MS) revealed 100% complete de-chlorination of allyl chloride accompanied by three non-chloro products. This is the first report of benzyl headgroup-induced micellar enhancement by an electrochemical method, showing that it is possible to use hydrophobic benzyl headgroup-substitution to tune the properties of micelles for various applications. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Catalytical Technology in South Korea)
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Review

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Open AccessReview
Flexibility in Metal–Organic Frameworks: A Basic Understanding
Catalysts 2019, 9(6), 512; https://doi.org/10.3390/catal9060512 - 06 Jun 2019
Abstract
Much has been written about the fundamental aspects of the metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). Still, details concerning the MOFs with structural flexibility are not comprehensively understood. However, a dramatic increase in research activities concerning rigid MOFs over the years has brought deeper levels of [...] Read more.
Much has been written about the fundamental aspects of the metal–organic frameworks (MOFs). Still, details concerning the MOFs with structural flexibility are not comprehensively understood. However, a dramatic increase in research activities concerning rigid MOFs over the years has brought deeper levels of understanding for their properties and applications. Nonetheless, robustness and flexibility of such smart frameworks are intriguing for different research areas such as catalysis, adsorption, etc. This manuscript overviews the different aspects of framework flexibility. The review has touched lightly on several ideas and proposals, which have been demonstrated within the selected examples to provide a logical basis to obtain a fundamental understanding of their synthesis and behavior to external stimuli. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue State-of-the-Art Catalytical Technology in South Korea)
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Planned Papers

The below list represents only planned manuscripts. Some of these manuscripts have not been received by the Editorial Office yet. Papers submitted to MDPI journals are subject to peer-review.

Title: Identification of an Ionic Interaction that Distinguishes between Organic Solvent Tolerance and Thermal Stability in an Organic Solvent-Tolerant Lipase PML
Authors: VinayKumar Dachuri, Sei-Heon Jang, and ChangWoo Lee *
Affiliation: Department of Biomedical Science and Center for Bio-Nanomaterials, Daegu University, Gyeongsan 38453, South Korea
Abstract: Thermophilic enzymes and organic solvent-tolerant enzymes maintain their stability via intramolecular interactions, but no interactions that are simply responsible for organic solvent tolerance of the enzymes have been described to date. In this study, we investigated the role of ionic interactions (R237, R241, and D248) that hold an a-helix and a b-strand in which catalytic Asp and His residues are located, respectively, in an organic solvent-tolerant, cold-adapted lipase PML. Wildtype PML showed optimum activity at 35°C, but Ala substitutions caused a -10°C reduction in optimum temperature of the mutants. Surprisingly, while Ala-substituted mutants maintained their thermal stability at room temperature, they became vulnerable to denaturation in 10–40% DMSO and methanol. Furthermore, PML mutants showed reduced conformational flexibility in buffer containing 10–40% DMSO, whereas wildtype and mutant PML enzymes maintained or increased specific activity in buffer without organic solvents by increasing their conformational flexibility. The results of this study indicate that the ionic interaction involving R237, R241, and D248 are important in maintaining organic solvent tolerance of PML, but not for its thermal stability. Our study provides novel insight into the organic solvent tolerance mechanism of enzymes.
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