Special Issue "Head and Neck Cancer"

A special issue of Cancers (ISSN 2072-6694).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 August 2015)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Dr. Maie A. St. John

Department of Head and Neck Surgery, UCLA Head and Neck Cancer Program, Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
Website | E-Mail

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

This year, nearly 70,000 new cases of Head and Neck Cancer will be diagnosed. The major causes of head and neck cancer-related deaths are persistent or recurrent disease. Despite focused research, the five-year survival rate for patients with advanced head and neck cancer remains approximately 15-20 percent. Head and Neck cancers are debilitating diseases where patient prognosis depends heavily on complete tumor resection. Recent advances in both the laboratory and the clinic continue to improve the outcome for patients. This Special Issue of Cancers gives an opportunity to describe recent original research in the field of Head & Neck Cancer, the development or application of new platforms or insights, and/or reviews of the field. We are particularly interested in genomics, immunomodulators, novel therapeutics, tumor margin localization, and new biomarker studies. (If you would like to discuss an idea for a paper before committing please contact the Guest Editor or the Editorial Office.)

Dr. Maie A. St. John
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Cancers is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1800 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.


Keywords

  • SCCA
  • HNSCC
  • cancer imaging
  • early cancer detection
  • intraoperative cancer imaging
  • imaging of tumor margins
  • novel therapeutic platforms
  • HPV
  • immune checkpoints
  • biomarkers

Published Papers (7 papers)

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Research

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Open AccessArticle Genetic Susceptibility in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma in a Spanish Population
Cancers 2019, 11(4), 493; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers11040493
Received: 7 March 2019 / Revised: 2 April 2019 / Accepted: 4 April 2019 / Published: 7 April 2019
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Abstract
Despite classical environmental risk factors like tobacco, alcohol or viral infection, not all individuals develop head and neck cancer. Therefore, identification of the genetic susceptibility produced by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is an important task. A total of 296 human papillomavirus negative head [...] Read more.
Despite classical environmental risk factors like tobacco, alcohol or viral infection, not all individuals develop head and neck cancer. Therefore, identification of the genetic susceptibility produced by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) is an important task. A total of 296 human papillomavirus negative head and neck cancer (HNC) patients (126 laryngeal, 100 pharyngeal and 70 oral cavity) were included in the study, involving 29 candidate SNPs in genes within important carcinogenic pathways (oncogenesis and tumour suppression, DNA repair, inflammation, oxidation and apoptosis). Genotyping was performed using TaqMan probes or restriction fragment length assays in peripheral blood DNA. In addition, 259 paired controls were also evaluated with the same risk factors for each specific location. Nine SNPs in DNA repair (ERCC1 rs11615, ERCC2 rs13181), inflammatory (IL2 rs2069762, IL6 rs1800795), oxidative (NFE2L2 rs13035806 and rs2706110) and apoptotic genes (TP53 rs1042522, MDM2 rs2279744, BCL2 rs2279115) were differently associated with HNSCC susceptibility by location. Some of these SNPs were not described before in this tumour type. In conclusion, we describe several SNPs associated with HNC in a Spanish population. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer)
Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Tumor Volumes and Prognosis in Laryngeal Cancer
Cancers 2015, 7(4), 2236-2261; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers7040888
Received: 16 September 2015 / Revised: 19 October 2015 / Accepted: 27 October 2015 / Published: 10 November 2015
Cited by 9 | PDF Full-text (1349 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested [...] Read more.
Tumor staging systems for laryngeal cancer (LC) have been developed to assist in estimating prognosis after treatment and comparing treatment results across institutions. While the laryngeal TNM system has been shown to have prognostic information, varying cure rates in the literature have suggested concern about the accuracy and effectiveness of the T-classification in particular. To test the hypothesis that tumor volumes are more useful than T classification, we conducted a retrospective review of 78 patients with laryngeal cancer treated with radiation therapy at our institution. Using multivariable analysis, we demonstrate the significant prognostic value of anatomic volumes in patients with previously untreated laryngeal cancer. In this cohort, primary tumor volume (GTVP), composite nodal volumes (GTVN) and composite total volume (GTVP + GTVN = GTVC) had prognostic value in both univariate and multivariate cox model analysis. Interestingly, when anatomic volumes were measured from CT scans after a single cycle of induction chemotherapy, all significant prognosticating value for measured anatomic volumes was lost. Given the literature findings and the results of this study, the authors advocate the use of tumor anatomic volumes calculated from pretreatment scans to supplement the TNM staging system in subjects with untreated laryngeal cancer. The study found that tumor volume assessment after induction chemotherapy is not of prognostic significance. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer)
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Open AccessArticle Cytokine and Adipokine Levels in Patients with Premalignant Oral Lesions or in Patients with Oral Cancer Who Did or Did Not Receive 1α,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 Treatment upon Cancer Diagnosis
Cancers 2015, 7(3), 1109-1124; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers7030827
Received: 8 May 2015 / Revised: 9 June 2015 / Accepted: 17 June 2015 / Published: 25 June 2015
Cited by 4 | PDF Full-text (601 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Differences in levels of inflammation-modulating cytokines and adipokines in patients with premalignant oral lesions versus in patients that develop squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) were assessed. Also assessed was the impact of treating HNSCC patients with the immune regulatory [...] Read more.
Differences in levels of inflammation-modulating cytokines and adipokines in patients with premalignant oral lesions versus in patients that develop squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (HNSCC) were assessed. Also assessed was the impact of treating HNSCC patients with the immune regulatory mediator, 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 [1,25(OH)2D3], on modulators of inflammation. Compared to healthy controls, patients with premalignant oral lesions had increases in their systemic levels of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-17, and increases in the adipokine, leptin. However, levels of these pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipokine were reduced in patients with HNSCC. Treatment of HNSCC patients with 1,25(OH)2D3 increased levels of each of the measured immune mediators. Levels of the anti-inflammatory adipokine, adiponectin, were shifted inversely with the levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and with leptin. These studies demonstrate heightened immune reactivity in patients with premalignant lesions, which wanes in patients with HNSCC, but which is restored by treatment with 1,25(OH)2D3. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer)
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Review

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Open AccessReview Targeted Therapy in Locally Advanced and Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma (LA-R/M HNSCC)
Received: 27 November 2015 / Revised: 16 February 2016 / Accepted: 16 February 2016 / Published: 26 February 2016
Cited by 20 | PDF Full-text (1745 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other [...] Read more.
Surgery and radiotherapy are the standard treatment options for patients with squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN). Chemoradiotherapy is an alternative for patients with locally advanced disease. In recurrent/metastatic disease and after progression to platin-based regimens, no standard treatments other than best supportive care are currently available. Most SCCHN tumours overexpress the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). This receptor is a tyrosine-kinase membrane receptor that has been implicated in angiogenesis, tumour progression and resistance to different cancer treatments. In this review, we analysed the different drugs and pathways under development to treat SCCHN, especially recurrent/metastatic disease. Until now, the EGFR signalling pathway has been considered the most important target with respect to new drugs; however, new drugs, such as immunotherapies, are currently under study. As new treatments for SCCHN are developed, the influence of therapies with respect to overall survival, progression free survival and quality of life in patients with this disease is changing. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Anti-Tumor Immunity in Head and Neck Cancer: Understanding the Evidence, How Tumors Escape and Immunotherapeutic Approaches
Cancers 2015, 7(4), 2397-2414; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers7040900
Received: 17 September 2015 / Revised: 10 November 2015 / Accepted: 30 November 2015 / Published: 9 December 2015
Cited by 21 | PDF Full-text (616 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Many carcinogen- and human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated head and neck cancers (HNSCC) display a hematopoietic cell infiltrate indicative of a T-cell inflamed phenotype and an underlying anti-tumor immune response. However, by definition, these tumors have escaped immune elimination and formed a clinically significant [...] Read more.
Many carcinogen- and human papilloma virus (HPV)-associated head and neck cancers (HNSCC) display a hematopoietic cell infiltrate indicative of a T-cell inflamed phenotype and an underlying anti-tumor immune response. However, by definition, these tumors have escaped immune elimination and formed a clinically significant malignancy. A number of both genetic and environmental mechanisms may allow such immune escape, including selection of poorly antigenic cancer cell subsets, tumor produced proinflammatory and immunosuppressive cytokines, recruitment of immunosuppressive immune cell subsets into the tumor and expression of checkpoint pathway components that limit T-cell responses. Here, we explore concepts of antigenicity and immunogenicity in solid tumors, summarize the scientific and clinical data that supports the use of immunotherapeutic approaches in patients with head and neck cancer, and discuss immune-based treatment approaches currently in clinical trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer)
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Open AccessReview The Tip of the Iceberg: Clinical Implications of Genomic Sequencing Projects in Head and Neck Cancer
Cancers 2015, 7(4), 2094-2109; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers7040879
Received: 29 August 2015 / Revised: 12 October 2015 / Accepted: 15 October 2015 / Published: 21 October 2015
Cited by 14 | PDF Full-text (921 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text
Abstract
Recent genomic sequencing studies have provided valuable insight into genetic aberrations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite these great advances, certain hurdles exist in translating genomic findings to clinical care. Further correlation of genetic findings to clinical outcomes, additional analyses of [...] Read more.
Recent genomic sequencing studies have provided valuable insight into genetic aberrations in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Despite these great advances, certain hurdles exist in translating genomic findings to clinical care. Further correlation of genetic findings to clinical outcomes, additional analyses of subgroups of head and neck cancers and follow-up investigation into genetic heterogeneity are needed. While the development of targeted therapy trials is of key importance, numerous challenges exist in establishing and optimizing such programs. This review discusses potential upcoming steps for further genetic evaluation of head and neck cancers and implementation of genetic findings into precision medicine trials. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer)
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Open AccessReview Feasibility of Primary Tumor Culture Models and Preclinical Prediction Assays for Head and Neck Cancer: A Narrative Review
Cancers 2015, 7(3), 1716-1742; https://doi.org/10.3390/cancers7030858
Received: 2 July 2015 / Revised: 6 August 2015 / Accepted: 20 August 2015 / Published: 28 August 2015
Cited by 2 | PDF Full-text (821 KB) | HTML Full-text | XML Full-text | Supplementary Files
Abstract
Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated [...] Read more.
Primary human tumor culture models allow for individualized drug sensitivity testing and are therefore a promising technique to achieve personalized treatment for cancer patients. This would especially be of interest for patients with advanced stage head and neck cancer. They are extensively treated with surgery, usually in combination with high-dose cisplatin chemoradiation. However, adding cisplatin to radiotherapy is associated with an increase in severe acute toxicity, while conferring only a minor overall survival benefit. Hence, there is a strong need for a preclinical model to identify patients that will respond to the intended treatment regimen and to test novel drugs. One of such models is the technique of culturing primary human tumor tissue. This review discusses the feasibility and success rate of existing primary head and neck tumor culturing techniques and their corresponding chemo- and radiosensitivity assays. A comprehensive literature search was performed and success factors for culturing in vitro are debated, together with the actual value of these models as preclinical prediction assay for individual patients. With this review, we aim to fill a gap in the understanding of primary culture models from head and neck tumors, with potential importance for other tumor types as well. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Head and Neck Cancer)
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