Special Issue "Seismic Performance of Timber Platform Frame Buildings"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 January 2017)

Special Issue Editor

Guest Editor
Prof. Dr. Francisco López Almansa

Architecture Technology Department, Technical University of Catalonia, Avda. Diagonal 649, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
Website | E-Mail
Interests: civil engineering; structural engineering; earthquake engineering; energy dissipators; energy spectra; concrete structures; steel structures; timber structures

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Nowadays, it is widely accepted that timber constructions offer relevant environmental benefits if wood is collected from local and sustainably utilized forests, since this promotes the planting of trees and this stores carbon during its lifetime, thus reducing the greenhouse effect. Apart from sustainability issues, wooden constructions present other relevant advantages: high reusability, easy recyclability (low emission), moderate costs, high resistance/weight ratio, simpler foundations because of the lightweight timber, rapidity of construction, insulating qualities, and a pleasing appearance. Among the existing wooden constructing technologies, Timber Platform Frame Buildings are frequently preferred, mainly because their lesser timber consumption.

The seismic capacity of wooden buildings is, potentially, good. This is due to their light weight, their high damping, and the increased resistance of timber to rapidly varying forces; conversely, contrary to a certain common belief, timber is a rather brittle material. Therefore, ductility needs to be provided by steel fasteners or, more recently, by energy dissipators. In the first case, damage affects timber members, thus preventing any possibility of repair; in the second case, the technology is not yet fully developed and only few applications have been reported. Timber Platform Frame Buildings are extremely light, and have high redundancy; however, their lateral resistance is rather limited and the incorporation of steel frames has been recently proposed. All these circumstances point out that research on seismic behavior of Timber Platform Frame Buildings is strongly needed.

Scholars are cordially invited to submit their research to this Special Issue. We believe that it will serve as a platform to disseminate their works and to encourage further studies.

Prof. Dr. Francisco López Almansa
Guest Editor

Manuscript Submission Information

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Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

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Keywords

  • wooden construction
  • timber platform frame buildings
  • seismic performance

Published Papers (3 papers)

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Research

Open AccessFeature PaperArticle Experimental In-Plane Evaluation of Light Timber Walls Panels
Received: 27 March 2017 / Revised: 6 July 2017 / Accepted: 6 July 2017 / Published: 13 July 2017
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Abstract
In general, the satisfactory seismic performance of timber buildings can be partially attributed to the material characteristics of the wood itself and to the lightness of its own structure. The aim of this paper is to analyze the in-plane behavior of light timber [...] Read more.
In general, the satisfactory seismic performance of timber buildings can be partially attributed to the material characteristics of the wood itself and to the lightness of its own structure. The aim of this paper is to analyze the in-plane behavior of light timber walls panels through a series of monotonic and cyclic tests, and to evaluate how the sheathing material and the fixation to the base influence the overall response of the wall. Five tests are presented and discussed while the reliability of an analytical method to predict the response of the walls is studied. The sheathing material revealed to be important in the overall response of the wall. Moreover, the type of fixation to the base also revealed to be important in the in-plane response of timber walls. In-plane stiffnesses, static ductility, energy dissipation and damping ratio have been quantified. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Performance of Timber Platform Frame Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle Mass Timber Rocking Panel Retrofit of a Four-Story Soft-Story Building with Full-Scale Shake Table Validation
Received: 14 March 2017 / Revised: 20 May 2017 / Accepted: 24 May 2017 / Published: 8 June 2017
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Abstract
Soft-story wood-frame buildings have been recognized as a disaster preparedness problem for decades. There are tens of thousands of these multi-family three- and four-story structures throughout California and other cities in the United States. The majority were constructed between 1920 and 1970, with [...] Read more.
Soft-story wood-frame buildings have been recognized as a disaster preparedness problem for decades. There are tens of thousands of these multi-family three- and four-story structures throughout California and other cities in the United States. The majority were constructed between 1920 and 1970, with many being prevalent in the San Francisco Bay Area in California. The NEES-Soft project was a five-university multi-industry effort that culminated in a series of full-scale soft-story wood-frame building tests to validate retrofit philosophies proposed by (1) the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) P-807 guidelines and (2) a performance-based seismic retrofit (PBSR) approach developed within the project. Four different retrofit designs were developed and validated at full-scale, each with specified performance objectives, which were typically not the same. This paper focuses on the retrofit design using cross laminated timber (CLT) rocking panels and presents the experimental results of the full-scale shake table test of a four-story 370 m2 (4000 ft2) soft-story test building with that FEMA P-807 focused retrofit in place. The building was subjected to the 1989 Loma Prieta and 1992 Cape Mendocino ground motions scaled to 5% damped spectral accelerations ranging from 0.2 to 0.9 g. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Performance of Timber Platform Frame Buildings)
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Open AccessArticle Seismic Response of a Platform-Frame System with Steel Columns
Received: 30 January 2017 / Revised: 30 March 2017 / Accepted: 31 March 2017 / Published: 7 April 2017
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Abstract
Timber platform-frame shear walls are characterized by high ductility and diffuse energy dissipation but limited in-plane shear resistance. A novel lightweight constructive system composed of steel columns braced with oriented strand board (OSB) panels was conceived and tested. Preliminary laboratory tests were performed [...] Read more.
Timber platform-frame shear walls are characterized by high ductility and diffuse energy dissipation but limited in-plane shear resistance. A novel lightweight constructive system composed of steel columns braced with oriented strand board (OSB) panels was conceived and tested. Preliminary laboratory tests were performed to study the OSB-to-column connections with self-drilling screws. Then, the seismic response of a shear wall was determined performing a quasi-static cyclic-loading test of a full-scale specimen. Results presented in this work in terms of force-displacement capacity show that this system confers to shear walls high in-plane strength and stiffness with good ductility and dissipative capacity. Therefore, the incorporation of steel columns within OSB bracing panels results in a strong and stiff platform-frame system with high potential for low- and medium-rise buildings in seismic-prone areas. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Seismic Performance of Timber Platform Frame Buildings)
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