Special Issue "Reliability Assessment and Sustainable Rehabilitation of Structural Systems"

A special issue of Buildings (ISSN 2075-5309).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (30 April 2019).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Ayman Mosallam
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
The Henry Samueli School of Engineering, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697-2175, USA
Interests: Structural Health Monitoring, Sustainable Materials & Construction, Repair and Rehabilition of Buildings and Bridges
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Prof. Suleyman Adanur
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Karadeniz Teknik Universitesi, Department of Civil Engineering, Trabzon, Turkey
Interests: Structural Analysis, Finite Element Modeling, Construction, Dynamics, Bridge Engineering, Finite Element Method, Structural Engineering, Reinforced Concrete, Vibration Testing, Fiber Reinforced Polymers, Structural Dynanics
Prof. Ahmet Can Altunişik
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Karadeniz Teknik Universitesi, Department of Civil Engineering, Trabzon, Turkey
Interests: Finite Element Analysis; Structural Analysis; Digital Signal Processing; Finite Element Modeling; Construction; Structural Dynamics; Engineering, Applied and Computational Mathematics; Earthquake Engineering; Stress Analysis; Nonlinear Analysis; FE Analysis; Dynamic Analysis; Composites; Civil Engineering; Structural Stability; Dynamics; Modal Analysis
Dr. Theodoros Rousakis
E-Mail Website
Guest Editor
Department of Civil Engineering, Democritus University of Thrace.
Interests: Finite Element Analysis; Structural Analysis; Finite Element Modeling; Construction; Construction Engineering; Structural Dynamics; Civil Engineering Materials; Earthquake Engineering; Nonlinear Analysis; Building Materials; Construction Materials; Dynamic Analysis; Concrete Technologies

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

The ability to predict service life of structural systems and early identification of damages of buildings play a crucial role on expanding the service life of structures in addition to increasing safety and reliability of such facilities. In addition, the selection of durable and sustainable repair and rehabilitation materials and processes is a vital element in achieving reliable and efficient strengthening scheme for buildings and other structural systems.  With the current advances in structural health monitoring and remote sensing, engineers became more equipped with the required tools to ensure safe and efficient performance of existing infrastructural systems.   This special issue aims at providing the engineering community with a collection of high-quality and peer-reviewed papers addressing different aspects of Reliability Assessment and Sustainable Rehabilitation Methodologies of different Structural Systems.

Original research, theoretical and experimental, case studies, and comprehensive review papers are invited for possible publication in this special issue. Relevant topics to this special issue include, but not limited to the following subjects:

  1. Structural Reliability
  2. Structural Health Monitoring
  3. Damage Detection Techniques
  4. Sustainable Rehabilitation of Structural Systems
  5. Diagnostic/ prognostic Systems
  6. Building Environmental and Economic Sustainability (BEES),
  7. Early Warning Systems
  8. Structural Performance Indicators
  9. Life Cycle Assessment
  10. Advanced Repair & Rehabilitation Materials and Systems

Prof. Ayman Mosallam
Prof. Suleyman Adanur
Prof. Ahmet Can Altunişik
Dr. Theodoros Rousakis
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Buildings is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Structural Reliability
  • Structural Health Monitoring
  • Damage Detection Techniques
  • Sustainable Rehabilitation of Structural Systems
  • Diagnostic/prognostic Systems
  • Building Environmental and Economic Sustainability (BEES)
  • Early Warning Systems
  • Structural Performance Indicators
  • Life Cycle Assessment
  • Advanced Repair & Rehabilitation Materials

Published Papers (6 papers)

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Research

Open AccessArticle
Numerical Modeling of Masonry Infilled Reinforced Concrete Building during Construction Stages Using ABAQUS Software
Buildings 2019, 9(8), 181; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9080181 - 08 Aug 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
The effects of seismic actions on reinforced concrete (RC) structures are strongly influenced by the dynamic behavior of their materials. It is crucial to find a simple definition of the natural frequencies of reinforced concrete buildings, particularly in relation to both principal and [...] Read more.
The effects of seismic actions on reinforced concrete (RC) structures are strongly influenced by the dynamic behavior of their materials. It is crucial to find a simple definition of the natural frequencies of reinforced concrete buildings, particularly in relation to both principal and secondary elements constructing the reinforced concrete building type. This paper firstly presents a comparison with the ambient vibration surveys. An analysis model of different stages of construction of the reinforced concrete masonry wall was compared using the finite element software. In the second step, structural responses of the model were investigated by means of static analysis. Three main types were examined: Bare frame for one, two and three storeys; brick-walled; and coated cases. Modal analysis is carried out by ABAQUS software starting from the deformed building, to provide the natural frequencies and mode shapes. For the natural frequencies, a good agreement is obtained between analytical and experimental results. Furthermore, the comparison results between different cases show that the application of the plaster work increases the lateral stiffness and has significant effects on the dynamic response of the buildings. Full article
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Open AccessFeature PaperArticle
Repair of Heavily Damaged RC Beams Failing in Shear Using U-Shaped Mortar Jackets
Buildings 2019, 9(6), 146; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9060146 - 14 Jun 2019
Abstract
The effectiveness of slightly reinforced thin U-shaped cementitious mortar jacketing for the repair of damaged shear-critical reinforced concrete beams is experimentally investigated. The test project includes two parts. In the first one, five concrete beams over-reinforced against flexure and under-reinforced against shear with [...] Read more.
The effectiveness of slightly reinforced thin U-shaped cementitious mortar jacketing for the repair of damaged shear-critical reinforced concrete beams is experimentally investigated. The test project includes two parts. In the first one, five concrete beams over-reinforced against flexure and under-reinforced against shear with different ratio of closed stirrups were initially subjected to monotonic loading until failure. The initially tested beams have been designed to fail in shear after wide diagonal cracking and to exhibit various strength and deformation capacities along with different levels of damages. In the second experimental part, the heavily damaged beams were jacketed with mild steel small diameter U-shaped transverse stirrups and longitudinal reinforcing bars. The retrofitted specimens using the proposed jacketing technique were tested again following the same four-point-bending load scheme. Based on the overall performance of the beams, it is deduced that the shear strength and deformation capability of the jacketed beams were substantially increased compared to the corresponding capacities of the initial beams. Further, although all beams failed in a shear abrupt manner, the retrofitted ones exhibited reduced brittleness and higher deflections at failure up to six times with respect to the initially tested specimens. The level of the initial damage influences the efficiency of the jacketing. Additional test data derived from relative shear-damaged beam specimens and retrofitted with similar thin jackets is also presented herein in order to establish the effectiveness of this repair system and to clarify the parameters affecting its structural reliability. Comparisons indicated that jacketed beams can alter the failure mode from brittle shear to ductile flexural under certain circumstances. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Rehabilitation of Corrosion-Defected RC Beam-Column Members Using Patch Repair Technique
Buildings 2019, 9(5), 120; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9050120 - 10 May 2019
Abstract
An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of patch repair to rehabilitate corrosion-defected reinforced concrete (RC) beam-column members when exposed to bending moments and axial forces. Ten RC beam-column members were tested under combined constant axial force and four-point transverse load [...] Read more.
An experimental study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency of patch repair to rehabilitate corrosion-defected reinforced concrete (RC) beam-column members when exposed to bending moments and axial forces. Ten RC beam-column members were tested under combined constant axial force and four-point transverse load up to failure. Two levels of the constant axial force were applied at either 15 kN or 30 kN (i.e., 25% or 50% of the ultimate design load of the control specimen). The accelerated corrosion process was used to get steel reinforcement corrosion inside the concrete of three levels, 0% and approximately 5% and 20%, according to Faraday’s law. The patch repair technique of cleaning or replacing corroded steel bars and replacing the damaged concrete cover with new mortar was used in this study. The experimental results of the corrosion-defected specimens showed a significant deterioration in the structural performance and the integrity by reducing ultimate capacity, stiffness, serviceability, and ductility. Additionally, the effect of increasing axial force was recorded clearly by reducing the adverse effect of corrosion, especially for defected specimens with high corrosion level. The deterioration of corrosion reinforcement could be overcome when using a patch repair technique, which restored the undamaged state and was shown clearly by using a patch repair technique with replacing corroded steel bars. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Seismic Retrofit of R/C T-Beams with Steel Fiber Polymers under Cyclic Loading Conditions
Buildings 2019, 9(4), 101; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9040101 - 24 Apr 2019
Cited by 2
Abstract
This paper presents results of an experimental study on seismic response of reinforced concrete (RC) T-beams with shear deficiencies strengthened with externally bonded steel fiber reinforced polymer (SFRP) strips. Seven cantilever RC beams were strengthened with externally bonded uniaxial SFRP strips in a [...] Read more.
This paper presents results of an experimental study on seismic response of reinforced concrete (RC) T-beams with shear deficiencies strengthened with externally bonded steel fiber reinforced polymer (SFRP) strips. Seven cantilever RC beams were strengthened with externally bonded uniaxial SFRP strips in a U-shape configuration and were tested under cyclic loading conditions. The two main variables examined were the strip spacing and the use of anchoring system. Among the investigated anchoring systems, one was patented, and it is studied in the present manuscript. The examination of the results leads to the conclusion that the anchoring system has a significantly more pronounced effect on the performance of the beams and the mode of failure than the type or spacing of the strips. Furthermore, SFRP strips seem to have a great potential to be used for shear strengthening, especially since the use of mechanical anchoring systems drastically improves their performance. On the contrary, the lack of mechanical anchoring results in premature delamination of the strengthening system, and thus an undesirable SFRP material performance. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Corroded RC Beams at Service Load before and after Patch Repair and Strengthening with NSM CFRP Strips
Buildings 2019, 9(3), 67; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9030067 - 18 Mar 2019
Cited by 1
Abstract
This paper presents the experimental results of the structural behavior of four reinforced concrete beams with corroded steel reinforcement at service loads. One beam was non-corroded, one beam was corroded under an accelerated electrochemical technique to a small corrosion level (for one corrosion [...] Read more.
This paper presents the experimental results of the structural behavior of four reinforced concrete beams with corroded steel reinforcement at service loads. One beam was non-corroded, one beam was corroded under an accelerated electrochemical technique to a small corrosion level (for one corrosion cycle), while two beams were corroded under the same conditions of an accelerated electrochemical technique and then subjected to vertical service loads that corresponded to 60% and 75% of the yield load of the non-corroded beam respectively for three corrosion cycles (with maximum mass loss around 25% for the first and 31% for the latter). Longitudinal cracks due to corrosion and flexural cracks due to loading were thoroughly recorded at the end of each cycle. The beam under the 75% service load had higher deflection increase for heavier corrosion. After the three successive serviceability load tests, the cracked concrete cover was removed and the steel rebars were treated. The cement-based repair mortar and two NSM FRP laminates were applied to both beams and were tested to failure. Despite the heavy corrosion, the patch repair and NSM strengthening enhanced the load-bearing capacity of the beams when compared with the non-corroded beam. All 10 tests are thoroughly discussed. Full article
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Open AccessArticle
Ultimate Shear of RC Beams with Corroded Stirrups and Strengthened with FRP
Buildings 2019, 9(2), 34; https://doi.org/10.3390/buildings9020034 - 29 Jan 2019
Cited by 4
Abstract
Transverse reinforcement plays a key role in the response behavior of reinforced concrete beams. Therefore, corrosion of steel stirrups may change the failure mode of elements from bending to shear, leading to a brittle and catastrophic crisis. It is important to strengthen reinforced [...] Read more.
Transverse reinforcement plays a key role in the response behavior of reinforced concrete beams. Therefore, corrosion of steel stirrups may change the failure mode of elements from bending to shear, leading to a brittle and catastrophic crisis. It is important to strengthen reinforced concrete beams with corroded stirrups to enhance the shear resistance. This paper presents a formulation, based on the modified compression field theory, to estimate the ultimate shear of reinforced concrete beams strengthened with FRP, because of stirrup corrosion. The detrimental effect of corrosion on steel stirrup yield strength was taken into account by introducing an empirical decay law. The effective strain of FRP reinforcement was adequately evaluated by considering both debonding and tensile stress rupture. The proposed model was validated against collected experimental results, showing a good ability to evaluate shear strength. Moreover, a numerical analysis was carried out to highlight the role of the key parameters predicting the ultimate shear. Full article
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