Special Issue "Plasmonic and Photonic Biosensors"

A special issue of Biosensors (ISSN 2079-6374).

Deadline for manuscript submissions: closed (31 March 2020).

Special Issue Editors

Prof. Fabrizio Giorgis
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico of Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy
Interests: optics and photonics; plasmonics; nanotechnological processes; optical biosensing; surface-enhanced Raman scattering
Special Issues and Collections in MDPI journals
Dr. Chiara Novara
Website
Guest Editor
Department of Applied Science and Technology, Politecnico of Torino, C.so Duca degli Abruzzi 24, 10129 Torino, Italy
Interests: plasmonics; vibrational spectroscopies; synthesis and functionalization of nanomaterials; surface enhanced Raman scattering; optofluidic biosensing platforms

Special Issue Information

Dear Colleagues,

Biosensing platforms based on optical transduction methods offer great advantages over conventional analytical techniques because they enable the direct, fast, real-time, and often label-free detection of many biological molecules, showing high specificity, sensitivity, small size, and cost-effectiveness. In such a framework, research on advanced plasmonic and photonic biosensors has been mainly directed towards healthcare, environmental applications, and biotechnology. This development takes advantage of multidisciplinary expertise, including optics, microelectronics, microelectromechanical systems, microfluidics, micro/nanotechnological processes, materials science, chemistry, molecular biology, biomedicine, and agri-food sciences.

In the last two decades, several nanomaterials have been developed, aimed at exploiting the interaction of optical electromagnetic fields with customized biorecognition elements. Among them, metal–dielectric plasmonic nanostructures and one/two/three-dimensional photonic crystals represent the main building blocks of advanced biosensors based on mechanisms such as metal enhanced fluorescence, surface enhanced Raman scattering, surface plasmon resonance, and waveguide- and reflectometric-based interference spectroscopy, where the main challenges are to detect small molecules at ultralow concentrations and produce compact devices for point-of-care analysis.

This Special Issue aims to introduce recent progress in the fabrication and application of plasmonic and photonic biosensors, promoting a synergy of several complementary competences in the research community.

Prof. Fabrizio Giorgis
Dr. Chiara Novara
Guest Editors

Manuscript Submission Information

Manuscripts should be submitted online at www.mdpi.com by registering and logging in to this website. Once you are registered, click here to go to the submission form. Manuscripts can be submitted until the deadline. All papers will be peer-reviewed. Accepted papers will be published continuously in the journal (as soon as accepted) and will be listed together on the special issue website. Research articles, review articles as well as short communications are invited. For planned papers, a title and short abstract (about 100 words) can be sent to the Editorial Office for announcement on this website.

Submitted manuscripts should not have been published previously, nor be under consideration for publication elsewhere (except conference proceedings papers). All manuscripts are thoroughly refereed through a single-blind peer-review process. A guide for authors and other relevant information for submission of manuscripts is available on the Instructions for Authors page. Biosensors is an international peer-reviewed open access monthly journal published by MDPI.

Please visit the Instructions for Authors page before submitting a manuscript. The Article Processing Charge (APC) for publication in this open access journal is 1000 CHF (Swiss Francs). Submitted papers should be well formatted and use good English. Authors may use MDPI's English editing service prior to publication or during author revisions.

Keywords

  • Raman spectroscopy
  • Surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS)
  • Fluorescence spectroscopy
  • Metal enhanced fluorescence
  • Reflectometric interference spectroscopy
  • Waveguide interference spectroscopy
  • Metal–dielectric plasmonic nanostructures and nanoparticles
  • Photonic crystals
  • Dielectric multilayers
  • Nanotechnological fabrication
  • Microfluidics
  • Trace hazard substances detection
  • Early cancer diagnostics
  • Biosensors for sustainable food engineering
  • Optical biosensors
  • Portable biosensing platforms

Published Papers (2 papers)

Order results
Result details
Select all
Export citation of selected articles as:

Research

Open AccessArticle
Flexible and Transparent Substrates Based on Gold Nanoparticles and TiO2 for in Situ Bioanalysis by Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy
Biosensors 2019, 9(4), 145; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9040145 - 17 Dec 2019
Abstract
Flexible and transparent substrates are emerging as low cost and easy-to-operate support for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). In particular, in situ SERS detection approach for surface characterization in transmission modality can be efficiently employed for non-invasive analysis of non-planar surfaces. Here we propose [...] Read more.
Flexible and transparent substrates are emerging as low cost and easy-to-operate support for surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS). In particular, in situ SERS detection approach for surface characterization in transmission modality can be efficiently employed for non-invasive analysis of non-planar surfaces. Here we propose a new methodology to fabricate a homogenous, transparent, and flexible SERS membrane by the assistance of a thin TiO2 porous layer deposited on the PDMS surface, which supports the uniform loading of gold nanoparticles over large area. The substrate was first characterized for homogeneity, sensitivity and repeatability using a model molecule for SERS, i.e., 7-mercapto-4-methylcoumarin. Satisfactory intra-substrate uniformity and inter-substrates repeatability was achieved, showing an RSD of 10%, and an analytical sensitivity down to 10 nM was determined with an EF of 3.4 × 105 ± 0.4 × 105. Furthermore, SERS detection of pyrimethanil (PMT), a commonly employed pesticide in crops for human consumption, was performed in situ, exploiting the optical transparency of the device, using both model surfaces and non-flat bio-samples. PMT contamination at the phytochemical concentration levels corresponding to commonly used infield doses was successfully detected on the surface of the yellow Ficus benjiamina leaves, supporting the use of this substrate for food safety in-field application. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonic and Photonic Biosensors)
Show Figures

Graphical abstract

Open AccessArticle
Tetrahydrocannabinol Sensing in Complex Biofluid with Portable Raman Spectrometer Using Diatomaceous SERS Substrates
Biosensors 2019, 9(4), 125; https://doi.org/10.3390/bios9040125 - 14 Oct 2019
Abstract
Using thin-layer chromatography in tandem with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TLC-SERS) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) sensing in complex biological fluids is successfully conducted with a portable Raman spectrometer. Both THC and THC metabolites are detected from the biofluid of marijuana-users as biomarkers for identifying cannabis [...] Read more.
Using thin-layer chromatography in tandem with surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (TLC-SERS) and tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) sensing in complex biological fluids is successfully conducted with a portable Raman spectrometer. Both THC and THC metabolites are detected from the biofluid of marijuana-users as biomarkers for identifying cannabis exposure. In this article, ultra-sensitive SERS substrates based on diatomaceous earth integrated with gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) were employed to detect trace levels of cannabis biomarkers in saliva. Strong characteristic THC and THC metabolite SERS peaks at 1601 and 1681 cm−1 were obtained despite the moderate interference of biological molecules native to saliva. Urine samples were also analyzed, but they required TLC separation of THC from the urine sample to eliminate the strong influence of urea and other organic molecules. TLC separation of THC from the urine was performed by porous microfluidic channel devices using diatomaceous earth as the stationary phase. The experimental results showed clear separation between urea and THC, and strong THC SERS characteristic peaks. Principal component analysis (PCA) was used to analyze the SERS spectra collected from various THC samples. The spectra in the principal component space were well clustered for each sample type and share very similar scores in the main principal component (PC1), which can serve as the benchmark for THC sensing from complex SERS spectra. Therefore, we proved that portable Raman spectrometers can enable an on-site sensing capability using diatomaceous SERS substrates to detect THC in real biological solutions. This portable THC sensing technology will play pivotal roles in forensic analysis, medical diagnosis, and public health. Full article
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plasmonic and Photonic Biosensors)
Show Figures

Figure 1

Back to TopTop